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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10591
Tacitus, Histories, 1.15
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Martial, Spectacula, 3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Suetonius, Augustus, 58.1-58.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Tacitus, Annals, 2.49, 3.27, 4.32-4.33 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.49.  Nearly at the same time, he consecrated the temples, ruined by age or fire, the restoration of which had been undertaken by Augustus. They included a temple to Liber, Libera, and Ceres, close to the Circus Maximus, and vowed by Aulus Postumius, the dictator; another, on the same site, to Flora, founded by Lucius and Marcus Publicius in their aedileship, and a shrine of Janus, built in the Herb Market by Gaius Duilius, who first carried the Roman cause to success on sea and earned a naval triumph over the Carthaginians. The temple of Hope, vowed by Aulus Atilius in the same war, was dedicated by Germanicus. 4.32.  I am not unaware that very many of the events I have described, and shall describe, may perhaps seem little things, trifles too slight for record; but no parallel can be drawn between these chronicles of mine and the work of the men who composed the ancient history of the Roman people. Gigantic wars, cities stormed, routed and captive kings, or, when they turned by choice to domestic affairs, the feuds of consul and tribune, land-laws and corn-laws, the duel of nobles and commons — such were the themes on which they dwelt, or digressed, at will. Mine is an inglorious labour in a narrow field: for this was an age of peace unbroken or half-heartedly challenged, of tragedy in the capital, of a prince careless to extend the empire. Yet it may be not unprofitable to look beneath the surface of those incidents, trivial at the first inspection, which so often set in motion the great events of history. 4.33.  For every nation or city is governed by the people, or by the nobility, or by individuals: a constitution selected and blended from these types is easier to commend than to create; or, if created, its tenure of life is brief. Accordingly, as in the period of alternate plebeian domice and patrician ascendancy it was imperative, in one case, to study the character of the masses and the methods of controlling them; while, in the other, those who had acquired the most exact knowledge of the temper of the senate and the aristocracy were accounted shrewd in their generation and wise; so to‑day, when the situation has been transformed and the Roman world is little else than a monarchy, the collection and the chronicling of these details may yet serve an end: for few men distinguish right and wrong, the expedient and the disastrous, by native intelligence; the majority are schooled by the experience of others. But while my themes have their utility, they offer the minimum of pleasure. Descriptions of countries, the vicissitudes of battles, commanders dying on the field of honour, such are the episodes that arrest and renew the interest of the reader: for myself, I present a series of savage mandates, of perpetual accusations, of traitorous friendships, of ruined innocents, of various causes and identical results — everywhere monotony of subject, and satiety. Again, the ancient author has few detractors, and it matters to none whether you praise the Carthaginian or the Roman arms with the livelier enthusiasm. But of many, who underwent either the legal penalty or a form of degradation in the principate of Tiberius, the descendants remain; and, assuming the actual families to be now extinct, you will still find those who, from a likeness of character, read the ill deeds of others as an innuendo against themselves. Even glory and virtue create their enemies — they arraign their opposites by too close a contrast. But I return to my subject.
4. Tacitus, Histories, 1.1.4, 1.2-1.4, 1.11-1.12, 1.14, 1.16-1.19, 1.22, 1.27, 1.29, 1.32, 1.36, 1.40-1.41, 1.43, 1.47, 4.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.1.  The death of Vitellius was rather the end of war than the beginning of peace. The victors ranged through the city in arms, pursuing their defeated foes with implacable hatred: the streets were full of carnage, the fora and temples reeked with blood; they slew right and left everyone whom chance put in their way. Presently, as their licence increased, they began to hunt out and drag into the light those who had concealed themselves; did they espy anyone who was tall and young, they cut him down, regardless whether he was soldier or civilian. Their ferocity, which found satisfaction in bloodshed while their hatred was fresh, turned then afterwards to greed. They let no place remain secret or closed, pretending that Vitellians were in hiding. This led to the forcing of private houses or, if resistance was made, became an excuse for murder. Nor was there any lack of starvelings among the mob or of the vilest slaves ready to betray their rich masters; others were pointed out by their friends. Everywhere were lamentations, cries of anguish, and the misfortunes that befall a captured city; so that the citizens actually longed for the licence of Otho's and Vitellius's soldiers, which earlier they had detested. The generals of the Flavian party, who had been quick to start the conflagration of civil war, were unequal to the task of controlling their victory, for in times of violence and civil strife the worst men have the greatest power; peace and quiet call for honest arts.
5. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, None (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 69.20.1-69.20.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

69.20.2.  "I, my friends, have not been permitted by nature to have a son, but you have made it possible by legal enactment. Now there is this difference between the two methods — that a begotten son turns out to be whatever sort of person Heaven pleases, whereas one that is adopted a man takes to himself as the result of a deliberate selection. 69.20.3.  Thus by the process of nature a maimed and witless child is often given to a parent, but by process of selection one of sound body and sound mind is certain to be chosen. For this reason I formerly selected Lucius before all others — a person such as I could never have expected a child of my own to become.
7. Herodian, History of The Empire After Marcus, 7.6.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

8. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Severus, 21, 20 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adoption, imperial family and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 234, 235
adoption, praise for Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 234, 235
aequitas Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
annals Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
augustus, title Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 146
augustus adoptions by Peppard, The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context (2011) 81
augustus worship of Peppard, The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context (2011) 81
calatinus, atilius Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 26
calpurnius piso frugi licinianus, l. Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 234
cassius dio (l. cl. ? cassius dio), on imperial adoptions Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 234, 235
childlessness, in imperial family Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 235
civil war Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 14
coinage, coins Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
comitia curiata (representative assembly) Peppard, The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context (2011) 81
consensus Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 146
decline, historical, moral decline Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 78
decline, historical Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 78
domitian, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
emperor, princeps Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
emperors, adoption by Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 234, 235
emperors, childlessness of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 235
faith, fides Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 14
family, imperial, adoption and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 234, 235
family, imperial, childlessness within Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 235
fides Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 26; Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
flavian amphitheatre König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 132
flavians Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 78
forum holitorium Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 26
galba, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
galba (ser. galba imperator caesar augustus) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 234, 235
golden age Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 78
hadrian (p. aelius hadrianus), childlessness of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 235
historia augusta Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 234, 235
histories Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
hope, and religion Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 26
hope, personification of Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 26
imperial adoption meritocratic vs. dynastic succession Peppard, The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context (2011) 81
imperial adoption of piso by galba Peppard, The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context (2011) 81
imperial adoption of tiberius gemellus by caligula Peppard, The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context (2011) 81
imperium Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
interdiscursivity König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 132
l. calpurnius piso frugi licinianus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
libertas Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
literary interactions, diachronic König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 132
martial, liber spectaculorum König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 132
martial König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 132
marvels König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 132
mescinius rufus, lucius Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 146
nerva, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
nerva (m. cocceius nerva) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 235
oratory Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
pater patriae, title Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 146
pax, peace Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
people, roman Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 14
piso, adoption by galba Peppard, The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context (2011) 81
pliny (the elder) Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 14
pliny the younger, panegyric Peppard, The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context (2011) 81
pliny the younger (c. plinius caecilius secundus), on imperial adoptions Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 234, 235
prayer Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 14
principate, the roman Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
propaganda Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
rome, as centre of empire König and Whitton, Roman Literature under Nerva, Trajan and Hadrian: Literary Interactions, AD 96–138 (2018) 132
safety, personal, public' Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 14
seneca (minor) Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 14
sons, adoptive Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 234, 235
succession, imperial, adoption and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 234, 235
tacitus, p. cornelius Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
tacitus (historian) Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 14
tacitus (p. ? cornelius tacitus), on imperial adoptions Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 234, 235
tiberius gemellus Peppard, The Son of God in the Roman World: Divine Sonship in its Social and Political Context (2011) 81
trajan, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 79
trajan (m. ulpius traianus, later caesar nerva traianus augustus), adoption by nerva Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 235
trajan (m. ulpius traianus, later caesar nerva traianus augustus), childlessness of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 235
valerius maximus (our author), as a source for roman religion Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 14
valerius maximus (our author), professed purpose Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 14
vespasian Crabb, Luke/Acts and the End of History (2020) 78
vesta Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 14
vitruvius (author and architect) Mueller, Roman Religion in Valerius Maximus (2002) 14