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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10589
Tacitus, Dialogus De Oratoribus, 28.5-28.6
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Cicero, Brutus, 211 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Brutus, 211 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 7.23 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Cicero, Philippicae, 9.14 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Varro, On Agriculture, 1.59.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Livy, History, 29.14.5-29.14.14 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Ovid, Fasti, 4.225-4.344 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4.225. She desired him to serve her, and protect her temple 4.226. And said: “Wish, you might be a boy for ever.” 4.227. He promised to be true, and said: “If I’m lying 4.228. May the love I fail in be my last love.” 4.229. He did fail, and in meeting the nymph Sagaritis 4.230. Abandoned what he was: the goddess, angered, avenged it. 4.231. She destroyed the Naiad, by wounding a tree 4.232. Since the tree contained the Naiad’s fate. 4.233. Attis was maddened, and thinking his chamber’s roof 4.234. Was falling, fled for the summit of Mount Dindymus. 4.235. Now he cried: “Remove the torches”, now he cried: 4.236. “Take the whips away”: often swearing he saw the Furies. 4.237. He tore at his body too with a sharp stone 4.238. And dragged his long hair in the filthy dust 4.239. Shouting: “I deserved this! I pay the due penalty 4.240. In blood! Ah! Let the parts that harmed me, perish! 4.241. Let them perish!” cutting away the burden of his groin 4.242. And suddenly bereft of every mark of manhood. 4.243. His madness set a precedent, and his unmanly servant 4.244. Toss their hair, and cut off their members as if worthless.’ 4.245. So the Aonian Muse, eloquently answering the question 4.246. I’d asked her, regarding the causes of their madness. 4.247. ‘Guide of my work, I beg you, teach me also, where She 4.248. Was brought from. Was she always resident in our City? 4.249. ‘The Mother Goddess always loved Dindymus, Cybele 4.250. And Ida, with its pleasant streams, and the Trojan realm: 4.251. And when Aeneas brought Troy to Italian fields, the godde 4.252. Almost followed those ships that carried the sacred relics. 4.253. But she felt that fate didn’t require her powers in Latium 4.254. So she stayed behind in her long-accustomed place. 4.255. Later, when Rome was more than five centuries old 4.256. And had lifted its head above the conquered world 4.257. The priest consulted the fateful words of Euboean prophecy: 4.258. They say that what he found there was as follows: 4.259. ‘The Mother’s absent: Roman, I command you: seek the Mother. 4.260. When she arrives, she must be received in chaste hands.’ 4.261. The dark oracle’s ambiguity set the senators puzzling 4.262. As to who that parent might be, and where to seek her. 4.263. Apollo was consulted, and replied: ‘Fetch the Mother 4.264. of all the Gods, who you’ll find there on Mount Ida.’ 4.265. Noblemen were sent. Attalus at that time held 4.266. The Phrygian sceptre: he refused the Italian lords. 4.267. Marvellous to tell, the earth shook with long murmurs 4.268. And the goddess, from her shrine, spoke as follows: 4.269. ‘I myself wished them to seek me: don’t delay: send me 4.270. Willingly. Rome is a worthy place for all divinities.’ 4.271. Quaking with fear at her words, Attalus, said: ‘Go 4.272. You’ll still be ours: Rome claims Phrygian ancestry.’ 4.273. Immediately countless axes felled the pine-tree 4.274. Those trees pious Aeneas employed for his flight: 4.275. A thousand hands work, and the heavenly Mother 4.276. Soon has a hollow ship, painted in fiery colours. 4.277. She’s carried in perfect safety over her son’s waves 4.278. And reaches the long strait named for Phrixus’ sister 4.279. Passes fierce Rhoetum and the Sigean shore 4.280. And Tenedos and Eetion’s ancient kingdom. 4.281. Leaving Lesbos behind she then steered for the Cyclades 4.282. And the waves that break on Euboea’s Carystian shoals. 4.283. She passed the Icarian Sea, as well, where Icarus shed 4.284. His melting wings, giving his name to a vast tract of water. 4.285. Then leaving Crete to larboard, and the Pelopian wave 4.286. To starboard, she headed for Cythera, sacred to Venus. 4.287. From there to the Sicilian Sea, where Brontes, Sterope 4.288. And Aemonides forge their red-hot iron 4.289. Then, skirting African waters, she saw the Sardinian 4.290. Realm behind to larboard, and reached our Italy. 4.291. She’d arrived at the mouth (ostia) where the Tiber divide 4.292. To meet the deep, and flows with a wider sweep: 4.293. All the Knights, grave Senators, and commoners 4.294. Came to meet her at the mouth of the Tuscan river. 4.295. With them walked mothers, daughters, and brides 4.296. And all those virgins who tend the sacred fires. 4.297. The men wearied their arms hauling hard on the ropes: 4.298. The foreign vessel barely made way against the stream. 4.299. For a long time there’d been a drought: the grass was dry 4.300. And scorched: the boat stuck fast in the muddy shallows. 4.301. Every man, hauling, laboured beyond his strength 4.302. And encouraged their toiling hands with his cries. 4.303. Yet the ship lodged there, like an island fixed in mid-ocean: 4.304. And astonished at the portent, men stood and quaked. 4.305. Claudia Quinta traced her descent from noble Clausus 4.306. And her beauty was in no way unequal to her nobility: 4.307. She was chaste, but not believed so: hostile rumour 4.308. Had wounded her, false charges were levelled at her: 4.309. Her elegance, promenading around in various hairstyles 4.310. And her ready tongue, with stiff old men, counted against her. 4.311. Conscious of virtue, she laughed at the rumoured lies 4.312. But we’re always ready to credit others with faults. 4.313. Now, when she’d stepped from the line of chaste women 4.314. Taking pure river water in her hands, she wetted her head 4.315. Three times, three times lifted her palms to the sky 4.316. (Everyone watching her thought she’d lost her mind) 4.317. Then, kneeling, fixed her eyes on the goddess’s statue 4.318. And, with loosened hair, uttered these words: 4.319. “ Kind and fruitful Mother of the Gods, accept 4.320. A suppliant’s prayers, on this one condition: 4.321. They deny I’m chaste: let me be guilty if you condemn me: 4.322. Convicted by a goddess I’ll pay for it with my life. 4.323. But if I’m free of guilt, grant a pledge of my innocence 4.324. By your action: and, chaste, give way to my chaste hands.” 4.325. She spoke: then gave a slight pull at the rope 4.326. (A wonder, but the sacred drama attests what I say): 4.327. The goddess stirred, followed, and, following, approved her: 4.328. Witness the sound of jubilation carried to the stars. 4.329. They came to a bend in the river (called of old 4.330. The Halls of Tiber): there the stream turns left, ascending. 4.331. Night fell: they tied the rope to an oak stump 4.332. And, having eaten, settled to a tranquil sleep. 4.333. Dawn rose: they loosed the rope from the oak stump 4.334. After first laying a fire and offering incense 4.335. And crowned the stern, and sacrificed a heifer 4.336. Free of blemish, that had never known yoke or bull. 4.337. There’s a place where smooth-flowing Almo joins the Tiber 4.338. And the lesser flow loses its name in the greater: 4.339. There, a white-headed priest in purple robe 4.340. Washed the Lady, and sacred relics, in Almo’s water. 4.341. The attendants howled, and the mad flutes blew 4.342. And soft hands beat at the bull’s-hide drums. 4.343. Claudia walked in front with a joyful face 4.344. Her chastity proven by the goddess’s testimony:
8. Ovid, Tristia, 3.1.31-3.1.32, 3.1.34 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 6.5.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 31 (1st cent. CE

11. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 7.120, 34.31, 35.4-35.5, 35.26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Plutarch, Lucullus, 39 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Plutarch, Tiberius And Gaius Gracchus, 13.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 1.1.6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1.6.  As regards parents, I should like to see them as highly educated as possible, and I do not restrict this remark to fathers alone. We are told that the eloquence of the Gracchi owed much to their mother Cornelia, whose letters even to‑day testify to the cultivation of her style. Laelia, the daughter of Gaius Laelius, is said to have reproduced the elegance of her father's language in her own speech, while the oration delivered before the triumvirs by Hortensia, the daughter of Quintus Hortensius, is still read and not merely as a compliment to her sex.
17. Tacitus, Dialogus De Oratoribus, 28.4, 28.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
arcesilaus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
asia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
atia (mother of augustus), as imitator of cornelia Roller, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 203
aurelia (mother of iulius caesar), as imitator of cornelia Roller, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 203
avianius evander, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
caecilia, gaia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
claudia quinta Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
corinthian bronze Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
cornelia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
cubiculum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
damasippus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
dresden Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
edwards, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
eloquence/eloquentia, of women Roller, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 203
exemplum, illustrative vs. injunctive Roller, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 203
herculaneum, female statue type from Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
herculaneum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
licinius lucullus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
magna mater Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
museum, the capitoline museum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
norms Roller, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 203
palladium, as talisman Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
pietas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
pinacothecae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
pompeii, house of the vettii Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
rome, forum of julius caesar Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
rome, palatine hill Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58, 176
rome, portico of metellus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
rome, roma quadrata Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
rome, temple of apollo palatinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
rome, temple of divus augustus, victoria in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
rome, temple of venus genetrix Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
rome, via victoria Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
sempronius gracchus, ti. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58, 176
semproniusgracchus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58, 176
simulacrum versus signum, of women Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
statuary, miraculous properties of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
sthenius of thermae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
thompson, m. l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
trimble, j. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
valerius publicola, p., as collector Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
values, education Roller, Disclosure and Discretion in Roman Astrology: Manilius and his Augustan Contemporaries (2018) 203
verres, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
vipsanius agrippa, m., on public art Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
vitruvius, on houses Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
vitruvius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 58
women, idealized values and' Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176
women Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 176