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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10588
Tacitus, Annals, 3.76


Et Iunia sexagesimo quarto post Philippensem aciem anno supremum diem explevit, Catone avunculo genita, C. Cassii uxor, M. Bruti soror. testamentum eius multo apud vulgum rumore fuit, quia in magnis opibus cum ferme cunctos proceres cum honore nominavisset Caesarem omisit. quod civiliter acceptum neque prohibuit quo minus laudatione pro rostris ceterisque sollemnibus funus cohonestaretur. viginti clarissimarum familiarum imagines antelatae sunt, Manlii, Quinctii aliaque eiusdem nobilitatis nomina. sed praefulgebant Cassius atque Brutus eo ipso quod effigies eorum non visebantur. Junia, too, born niece to Cato, wife of Caius Cassius, sister of Marcus Brutus, looked her last on life, sixty-three full years after the field of Philippi. Her will was busily discussed by the crowd; because in disposing of her great wealth she mentioned nearly every patrician of note in complimentary terms, but omitted the Caesar. The slur was taken in good part, and he offered no objection to the celebration of her funeral with a panegyric at the Rostra and the rest of the customary ceremonies. The effigies of twenty great houses preceded her to the tomb — members of the Manlian and Quinctian families, and names of equal splendour. But Brutus and Cassius shone brighter than all by the very fact that their portraits were unseen.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

14 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 12.212 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.158, 2.2.160 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 2.1-2.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Seneca The Elder, Controversies, 8.2 (1st cent. BCE

6. Vergil, Aeneis, 1.202-1.206, 6.847-6.853 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.202. till rocks and blazing torches fill the air 1.203. (rage never lacks for arms)—if haply then 1.204. ome wise man comes, whose reverend looks attest 1.205. a life to duty given, swift silence falls; 1.206. all ears are turned attentive; and he sways 6.847. Lo! on the left and right at feast reclined 6.848. Are other blessed souls, whose chorus sings 6.849. Victorious paeans on the fragrant air 6.850. of laurel groves; and hence to earth outpours 6.851. Eridanus, through forests rolling free. 6.852. Here dwell the brave who for their native land 6.853. Fell wounded on the field; here holy priests
7. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 35.4-35.14, 36.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Plutarch, Cato The Elder, 19.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Suetonius, Otho, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Tacitus, Annals, 2.73.1, 3.5, 4.9.2, 4.34, 16.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.73.1.  His funeral, devoid of ancestral effigies or procession, was distinguished by eulogies and recollections of his virtues. There were those who, considering his personal appearance, his early age, and the circumstances of his death, — to which they added the proximity of the region where he perished, — compared his decease with that of Alexander the Great: — "Each eminently handsome, of famous lineage, and in years not much exceeding thirty, had fallen among alien races by the treason of their countrymen. But the Roman had borne himself as one gentle to his friends, moderate in his pleasures, content with a single wife and the children of lawful wedlock. Nor was he less a man of the sword; though he lacked the other's temerity, and, when his numerous victories had beaten down the Germanies, was prohibited from making fast their bondage. But had he been the sole arbiter of affairs, of kingly authority and title, he would have overtaken the Greek in military fame with an ease proportioned to his superiority in clemency, self-command, and all other good qualities." The body, before cremation, was exposed in the forum of Antioch, the place destined for the final rites. Whether it bore marks of poisoning was disputable: for the indications were variously read, as pity and preconceived suspicion swayed the spectator to the side of Germanicus, or his predilections to that of Piso. 3.5.  There were those who missed the pageantry of a state-funeral and compared the elaborate tributes rendered by Augustus to Germanicus' father, Drusus:— "In the bitterest of the winter, the sovereign had gone in person as far as Ticinum, and, never stirring from the corpse, had entered the capital along with it. The bier had been surrounded with the family effigies of the Claudian and Livian houses; the dead had been mourned in the Forum, eulogized upon the Rostra; every distinction which our ancestors had discovered, or their posterity invented, was showered upon him. But to Germanicus had fallen not even the honours due to every and any noble! Granted that the length of the journey was a reason for cremating his body, no matter how, on foreign soil, it would only have been justice that he should have been accorded all the more distinctions later, because chance had denied them at the outset. His brother had gone no more than one day's journey to meet him; his uncle not even to the gate. Where were those usages of the ancients — the image placed at the head of the couch, the set poems to the memory of departed virtue, the panegyrics, the tears, the imitations (if no more) of sorrow? 4.34.  The consulate of Cornelius Cossus and Asinius Agrippa opened with the prosecution of Cremutius Cordus upon the novel and till then unheard-of charge of publishing a history, eulogizing Brutus, and styling Cassius the last of the Romans. The accusers were Satrius Secundus and Pinarius Natta, clients of Sejanus. That circumstance sealed the defendant's fate — that and the lowering brows of the Caesar, as he bent his attention to the defence; which Cremutius, resolved to take his leave of life, began as follows:— "Conscript Fathers, my words are brought to judgement — so guiltless am I of deeds! Nor are they even words against the sole persons embraced by the law of treason, the sovereign or the parent of the sovereign: I am said to have praised Brutus and Cassius, whose acts so many pens have recorded, whom not one has mentioned save with honour. Livy, with a fame for eloquence and candour second to none, lavished such eulogies on Pompey that Augustus styled him 'the Pompeian': yet it was without prejudice to their friendship. Scipio, Afranius, this very Cassius, this Brutus — not once does he describe them by the now fashionable titles of brigand and parricide, but time and again in such terms as he might apply to any distinguished patriots. The works of Asinius Pollio transmit their character in noble colours; Messalla Corvinus gloried to have served under Cassius: and Pollio and Corvinus lived and died in the fulness of wealth and honour! When Cicero's book praised Cato to the skies, what did it elicit from the dictator Caesar but a written oration as though at the bar of public opinion? The letters of Antony, the speeches of Brutus, contain invectives against Augustus, false undoubtedly yet bitter in the extreme; the poems — still read — of Bibaculus and Catullus are packed with scurrilities upon the Caesars: yet even the deified Julius, the divine Augustus himself, tolerated them and left them in peace; and I hesitate whether to ascribe their action to forbearance or to wisdom. For things contemned are soon things forgotten: anger is read as recognition. 16.7.  To the death of Poppaea, outwardly regretted, but welcome to all who remembered her profligacy and cruelty, Nero added a fresh measure of odium by prohibiting Gaius Cassius from attendance at the funeral. It was the first hint of mischief. Nor was the mischief long delayed. Silanus was associated with him; their only crime being that Cassius was eminent for a great hereditary fortune and an austere character, Silanus for a noble lineage and a temperate youth. Accordingly, the emperor sent a speech to the senate, arguing that both should be removed from public life, and objecting to the former that, among his other ancestral effigies, he had honoured a bust of Gaius Cassius, inscribed:— "To the leader of the cause." The seeds of civil war, and revolt from the house of the Caesars, — such were the objects he had pursued. And, not to rely merely on the memory of a hated name as an incentive to faction, he had taken to himself a partner in Lucius Silanus, a youth of noble family and headstrong temper, who was to be his figure-head for a revolution.
11. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9.27.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9.27.3. Sappho of Lesbos wrote many poems about Love, but they are not consistent. Later on Lysippus made a bronze Love for the Thespians, and previously Praxiteles one of Pentelic marble. The story of Phryne and the trick she played on Praxiteles I have related in another place. See Paus. 1.20.1 . The first to remove the image of Love, it is said, was Gaius the Roman Emperor; Claudius, they say, sent it back to Thespiae, but Nero carried it away a second time.
12. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.17, 3.7.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.17. To Cornelius Titianus. Faith and loyalty are not yet extinct among men 0
13. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.17, 3.7.8 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.17. To Cornelius Titianus. Faith and loyalty are not yet extinct among men 0
14. Pseudo-Seneca, Octauia, 499, 502, 498



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
amnesia Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236
antonius, m. (mark antony) Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386
antony, mark Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
athens Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386
audience Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236
augustus/octavian, as author and builder Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
augustus/octavian, power of Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
authentic versus copy, and pleasure Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
battle, of philippi Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236, 386
cassius longinus, c., image venerated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
cassius longinus, c. Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236, 386; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94, 108
civil wars Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
coins Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
cornelius scipio africanus, p., image in temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
dedication (temple, epigraphic) Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386
defeat (military) Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386
ethics Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386
exemplum Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236, 386
family Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386
funeral speech Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 154; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 154
funerary (art, rituals, monuments, processions) Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236, 386
hannibal Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
hercules Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
his villa Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
house, atrium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
house, imagines in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
house, tablinum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
imagines, displayed in atria Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
imitatio Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
impietas against, veneration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
impietas against, viewer response to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
indeterminacy, historical narratives Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
intertextuality Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
julius caesar, c., image in jupiter capitolinus temple Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
julius caesar, c. Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236, 386
julius caesar octavian, c./augustus. Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386
junia tertulla Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94, 108
junius brutus, m., image venerated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
junius brutus, m. Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236
lararium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
leontini Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
mars Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
memory suppression Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236
monuments Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
names and naming Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
nile Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
omission Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
palestrina Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
paradigm Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236
parthian standards Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
phidias, and olympian zeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
pietas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
plutarch, on divine nature of statuary Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
polyclitus, the doryphorus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
polyclitus, the polyclitan canon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
pompey Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
portrait (imago) Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386
power, of the princeps Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
praxiteles, aphrodite of cnidos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
realism Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
remembering, remembrance Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236
renarrativization Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236
res gestae Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
romanitas Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, scipios statue in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
rome Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 154; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 154
self-representation Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386
senate Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386
silius italicus, venerates vergils image Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
site, of exemplarity Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386
site, of memory Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386
statuary, miraculous properties of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
statuary, sacred nature of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
style Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
syracuse Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
tacitus Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
tauromenium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
temple, of mars ultor Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 386; Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
theater Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
titinius capito, cn., venerates brutus and cassius images Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94, 108
tullius cicero, m., on sacred nature of statuary Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
tullius cicero, m., public versus private view of art Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
tyndaris Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
vengeance' Pandey, The Poetics of Power in Augustan Rome (2018) 165
venus, of cnidos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 94
vergil, image venerated Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., and the verralia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., cicero prosecutes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., public statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
verres, c., statues overturned Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
viewers, shared values of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108
war, civil war Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236
war, second triumvirate (43-36 bc) Dinter and Guérin, Cultural Memory in Republican and Augustan Rome (2023) 236
zeus, olympian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 108