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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10588
Tacitus, Annals, 2.41.1


nan The close of the year saw dedicated an arch near the temple of Saturn commemorating the recovery, "under the leader­ship of Germanicus and the auspices of Tiberius," of the eagles lost with Varus; a temple to Fors Fortuna on the Tiber bank, in the gardens which the dictator Caesar had bequeathed to the nation; a sanctuary to the Julian race, and an effigy to the deity of Augustus, at Bovillae. In the consulate of Gaius Caelius and Lucius Pomponius, Germanicus Caesar, on the twenty-sixth day of May, celebrated his triumph over the Cherusci, the Chatti, the Angrivarii, and the other tribes lying west of the Elbe. There was a procession of spoils and captives, of mimic mountains, rivers, and battles; and the war, since he had been forbidden to complete it, was assumed to be complete. To the spectators the effect was heightened by the noble figure of the commander himself, and by the five children who loaded his chariot. Yet beneath lay an unspoken fear, as men reflected that to his father Drusus the favour of the multitude had not brought happiness — that Marcellus, his uncle, had been snatched in youth from the ardent affections of the populace — that the loves of the Roman nation were fleeting and unblest!


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 3 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Livy, History, 34.10.5, 40.52.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 5.1.6-5.1.10 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Tacitus, Annals, 1.11.1, 2.22.1, 2.26.2, 2.26.4, 2.41.2, 2.83.1, 3.6.2, 3.24.3, 3.54.2, 3.58-3.59, 3.58.1, 3.64.3, 3.66.1, 3.71.2, 4.8.5, 4.15.3, 4.16.4, 4.36.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.11.1.  Then all prayers were directed towards Tiberius; who delivered a variety of reflections on the greatness of the empire and his own diffidence:— "Only the mind of the deified Augustus was equal to such a burden: he himself had found, when called by the sovereign to share his anxieties, how arduous, how dependent upon fortune, was the task of ruling a world! He thought, then, that, in a state which had the support of so many eminent men, they ought not to devolve the entire duties on any one person; the business of government would be more easily carried out by the joint efforts of a number." A speech in this tenor was more dignified than convincing. Besides, the diction of Tiberius, by habit or by nature, was always indirect and obscure, even when he had no wish to conceal his thought; and now, in the effort to bury every trace of his sentiments, it became more intricate, uncertain, and equivocal than ever. But the Fathers, whose one dread was that they might seem to comprehend him, melted in plaints, tears, and prayers. They were stretching their hands to heaven, to the effigy of Augustus, to his own knees, when he gave orders for a document to be produced and read. It contained a statement of the national resources — the strength of the burghers and allies under arms; the number of the fleets, protectorates, and provinces; the taxes direct and indirect; the needful disbursements and customary bounties catalogued by Augustus in his own hand, with a final clause (due to fear or jealousy?) advising the restriction of the empire within its present frontiers. 2.22.1.  First eulogizing the victors in an address, the Caesar raised a pile of weapons, with a legend boasting that "the army of Tiberius Caesar, after subduing the nations between the Rhine and the Elbe, had consecrated that memorial to Mars, to Jupiter, and to Augustus." Concerning himself he added nothing, either apprehending jealousy or holding the consciousness of the exploit to be enough. Shortly afterwards he commissioned Stertinius to open hostilities against the Angrivarii, unless they forestalled him by surrender. And they did, in fact, come to their knees, refusing nothing, and were forgiven all. 2.83.1.  Affection and ingenuity vied in discovering and decreeing honours to Germanicus: his name was to be chanted in the Saliar Hymn; curule chairs surmounted by oaken crowns were to be set for him wherever the Augustal priests had right of place; his effigy in ivory was to lead the procession at the Circus Games, and no flamen or augur, unless of the Julian house, was to be created in his room. Arches were added, at Rome, on the Rhine bank, and on the Syrian mountain of Amanus, with an inscription recording his achievements and the fact that he had died for his country. There was to be a sepulchre in Antioch, where he had been cremated; a funeral monument in Epidaphne, the suburb in which he had breathed his last. His statues, and the localities in which his cult was to be practised, it would be difficult to enumerate. When it was proposed to give him a gold medallion, as remarkable for the size as for the material, among the portraits of the classic orators, Tiberius declared that he would dedicate one himself "of the customary type, and in keeping with the rest: for eloquence was not measured by fortune, and its distinction enough if he ranked with the old masters." The equestrian order renamed the so‑called "junior section" in their part of the theatre after Germanicus, and ruled that on the fifteenth of July the cavalcade should ride behind his portrait. Many of these compliments remain: others were discontinued immediately, or have lapsed with the years. 3.58.  Meanwhile, after the governorship of Junius Blaesus in Africa had been extended, the Flamen Dialis, Servius Maluginensis, demanded the allotment of Asia to himself. "It was a common fallacy," he insisted, "that the flamens of Jove were not allowed to leave Italy; nor was his own legal status different from that of the flamens of Mars and Quirinus. If, then, they had had provinces allotted them, why was the right withheld from the priests of Jove? There was no national decree to be found on the point — nothing in the Books of Ceremonies. The pontiffs had often performed the rites of Jove, if the flamen was prevented by sickness or public business. For seventy-five years after the self-murder of Cornelius Merula no one had been appointed in his room, yet the rites had not been interrupted. But if so many years could elapse without a new creation, and without detriment to the cult, how much more easily could he absent himself for twelve months of proconsular authority? Personal rivalries had no doubt in former times led the pontiffs to prohibit his order from visiting the provinces: to‑day, by the grace of Heaven, the chief pontiff was also the chief of men, beyond the reach of jealousy, rancour, or private inclinations. 3.58.1.  Meanwhile, after the governor­ship of Junius Blaesus in Africa had been extended, the Flamen Dialis, Servius Maluginensis, demanded the allotment of Asia to himself. "It was a common fallacy," he insisted, "that the flamens of Jove were not allowed to leave Italy; nor was his own legal status different from that of the flamens of Mars and Quirinus. If, then, they had had provinces allotted them, why was the right withheld from the priests of Jove? There was no national decree to be found on the point — nothing in the Books of Ceremonies. The pontiffs had often performed the rites of Jove, if the flamen was prevented by sickness or public business. For seventy-five years after the self-murder of Cornelius Merula no one had been appointed in his room, yet the rites had not been interrupted. But if so many years could elapse without a new creation, and without detriment to the cult, how much more easily could he absent himself for twelve months of proconsular authority? Personal rivalries had no doubt in former times led the pontiffs to prohibit his order from visiting the provinces: to‑day, by the grace of Heaven, the chief pontiff was also the chief of men, beyond the reach of jealousy, rancour, or private inclinations. 3.59.  Since various objections to the argument were raised by the augur Lentulus and others, it was determined, in the upshot, to wait for the verdict of the supreme pontiff himself. Tiberius postponed his inquiry into the legal standing of the flamen, but modified the ceremonies with which it had been resolved to celebrate the tribunician power of Drusus; criticizing specifically the unprecedented motion of Haterius and the gold lettering so repugt to Roman custom. A letter, too, from Drusus was read, which, though tuned to a modest key, left an impression of extreme arrogance. "So the world," men said, "had come to this, that even a mere boy, invested with such an honour, would not approach the divinities of Rome, set foot within the senate, or, at the least, take the auspices on his native soil. War, they must assume, or some remote quarter of the world detained him; though at that instant he was perambulating the lakes and beaches of Campania! Such was the initiation of the governor of the human race, these the first lessons derived from the paternal instruction! A grey-haired emperor might, if he pleased, recoil from the view of his fellow-citizens, and plead the fatigue of age and the labours he had accomplished: but, in the case of Drusus, what impediment could there be save pride? 3.66.1.  Then, step by step, they passed from the degrading to the brutal. Gaius Silanus, the proconsul of Asia, accused of extortion by the provincials, was attacked simultaneously by the ex-consul Mamercus Scaurus, the praetor Junius Otho, and the aedile Bruttedius Niger, who flung at him the charge of violating the godhead of Augustus and spurning the majesty of Tiberius, while Mamercus made play with the precedents of antiquity — the indictment of Lucius Cotta by Scipio Africanus, of Servius Galba by Cato the Censor, of Publius Rutilius by Marcus Scaurus. Such, as all men know, were the crimes avenged by Scipio and Cato or the famous Scaurus, the great-grandsire of Mamercus, whom that reproach to his ancestors dishonoured by his infamous activity! Junius Otho's old profession had been to keep a school; afterwards, created a senator by the influence of Sejanus, by his effrontery and audacity he brought further ignominy, if possible, upon the meanness of his beginnings. Bruttedius, amply provided with liberal accomplishments, and bound, if he kept the straight road, to attain all distinctions, was goaded by a spirit of haste, which impelled him to outpace first his equals, then his superiors, and finally his own ambitions: an infirmity fatal to many, even of the good, who, disdaining the sure and slow, force a premature success, though destruction may accompany the prize.
5. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 51.19.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

51.19.3.  But it would be quite superfluous to go on and mention the prayers, the images, the privilege of the front seat, and all the other honours of the sort. At the beginning, then, they not only voted him these honours but also either took down or effaced the memorials of Antony, declared the day on which he had been born accursed, and forbade the use of the surname Marcus by any of his kind.
6. Gellius, Attic Nights, 10.15.14, 10.15.16 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Epigraphy, Cil, 12.4333

8. Fontes Iuris Romani Anteiustiniani (Fira), Fontes Iuris Romani Anteiustiniani (Fira), 3.73



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
anchises Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 292
arches, commemorative Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61, 62, 63
arches Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
as judge Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
asia Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 142, 177
augustus, divus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61
augustus, emperor Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
augustus, statues of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61, 63
augustus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 177
augustus (octavian), criticised Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 179
augustus (octavian), cult honours Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 179
augustus (octavian), imperial cult Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 179
augustus (octavian) Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 179
augustus octavian Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 292
auspices Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61, 63
authority, of ammianus, of tacitus Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 179
bovillae Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61, 63
burial plots, violations of Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
burials, legal aspects Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
caermioniae Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 177
capital punishment Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
civil wars Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61
confarreatio Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 177
consolatory literature Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 292
consuls Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 142
cuicul, numidia Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
deification, of augustus Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 179
deification Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 179
divus as title Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61
donatus Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 292
ductus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 62
edicts, of emperors Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
effigies Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61
emperor cult Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 63, 177
emperors, roman Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
ephesus, asia Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
family, imperial Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 62
flamen dialis Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 142, 177
flaminica Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 177
fortuna, fors fortuna, temple of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61, 62, 63
fortuna Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 177
fortunae of antium, providential aspect of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 63
germanicus, adopted son of tiberius Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
germanicus, campaigns of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 63
germanicus, relationship with tiberius Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61
germanicus, triumph of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61, 62, 63, 177
governors Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 142
imperial cult Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 179
imperium, conferral of Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
imperium Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 62
infaustus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 177
julian gens Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61, 63
julius caesar, c. Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61, 62
jupiter optimus maximus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61
lilybaeum, sicily Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
livia, temples dedicated to Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 177
livia Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 292
lucus feroniae, etruria Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
manubiae and spoils Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 62
marcellus, death of Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 292
marcellus Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 292
mark antony Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 292
mars Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 179
memory, cultic Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 177
monuments Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 62
munatius plancus, l. (dedicator of temple of saturn) Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 62
narbo, narbonne, gallia narbonensis Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
nazareth, judaea Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
nero (son of germanicus) Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 177
nida, germania superior Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
octavia Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 292
octavian Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
ostia portus Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
parade of heroes Sharrock and Keith, Maternal Conceptions in Classical Literature and Philosophy (2020) 292
pax deorum Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 142
pedestals, inscribed Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
pontifex maximus, emperor as Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 142
praetors Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 62
prayer Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61
priests and priesthoods Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 142
proconsuls Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 142
religio, religio, ritual, of Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 179
rhodes, as vehicle of cultural memory Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 142
rhodes, conservatism of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61, 177
rhodes, innovation in Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 142
rome, arch of tiberius, lost, in forum romanum Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
sacrifices Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
saturnalia, temple of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61, 63
sc de cn. pisone patre Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
sejanus, fortuna and Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 177
senate, and emperor Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 179
senate, failure of expertise Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 179
senate Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 177
servius maluginensis Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 142, 177
spoletium, umbria Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
tiber Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61
tiberius, emperor Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
tiberius, letters of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61
tiberius, military campaigns of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61
triumphal arches, inscribed Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
triumphal arches Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
triumphs' Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 63
triumphs Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61, 62, 177
vaga, africa Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197
varus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 61, 63
velleia, aemilia Bruun and Edmondson, The Oxford Handbook of Roman Epigraphy (2015) 197