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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10588
Tacitus, Annals, 2.27.1


nan Nearly at the same time, a charge of revolutionary activities was laid against Libo Drusus, a member of the Scribonian family. I shall describe in some detail the origin, the progress, and the end of this affair, as it marked the discovery of the system destined for so many years to prey upon the vitals of the commonwealth. Firmius Catus, a senator, and one of Libo's closest friends, had urged that short-sighted youth, who had a foible for absurdities, to resort to the forecasts of astrologers, the ritual of magicians, and the society of interpreters of dreams; pointing to his great-grandfather Pompey, to his great-aunt Scribonia (at one time the consort of Augustus), to his cousin­ship with the Caesars, and to his mansion crowded with ancestral portraits; encouraging him in his luxuries and loans; and, to bind him in a yet stronger chain of evidence, sharing his debaucheries and his embarrassments.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.48.3 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.48.3. All speculation as to its origin and its causes, if causes can be found adequate to produce so great a disturbance, I leave to other writers, whether lay or professional; for myself, I shall simply set down its nature, and explain the symptoms by which perhaps it may be recognized by the student, if it should ever break out again. This I can the better do, as I had the disease myself, and watched its operation in the case of others.
2. Sallust, Iugurtha, 6.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Suetonius, Tiberius, 49, 25 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Tacitus, Annals, 1.73, 1.73.1, 1.76, 1.78.1, 2.27.2, 2.32.2-2.32.3, 2.44.1, 4.16.4, 15.37.1-15.37.4, 15.49.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.73.  It will not be unremunerative to recall the first, tentative charges brought in the case of Falanius and Rubrius, two Roman knights of modest position; if only to show from what beginnings, thanks to the art of Tiberius, the accursed thing crept in, and, after a temporary check, at last broke out, an all-devouring conflagration. Against Falanius the accuser alleged that he had admitted a certain Cassius, mime and catamite, among the "votaries of Augustus," who were maintained, after the fashion of fraternities, in all the great houses: also, that when selling his gardens, he had parted with a statue of Augustus as well. To Rubrius the crime imputed was violation of the deity of Augustus by perjury. When the facts came to the knowledge of Tiberius, he wrote to the consuls that place in heaven had not been decreed to his father in order that the honour might be turned to the destruction of his countrymen. Cassius, the actor, with others of his trade, had regularly taken part in the games which his own mother had consecrated to the memory of Augustus; nor was it an act of sacrilege, if the effigies of that sovereign, like other images of other gods, went with the property, whenever a house or garden was sold. As to the perjury, it was on the same footing as if the defendant had taken the name of Jupiter in vain: the gods must look to their own wrongs. 1.73.1.  It will not be unremunerative to recall the first, tentative charges brought in the case of Falanius and Rubrius, two Roman knights of modest position; if only to show from what beginnings, thanks to the art of Tiberius, the accursed thing crept in, and, after a temporary check, at last broke out, an all-devouring conflagration. Against Falanius the accuser alleged that he had admitted a certain Cassius, mime and catamite, among the "votaries of Augustus," who were maintained, after the fashion of fraternities, in all the great houses: also, that when selling his gardens, he had parted with a statue of Augustus as well. To Rubrius the crime imputed was violation of the deity of Augustus by perjury. When the facts came to the knowledge of Tiberius, he wrote to the consuls that place in heaven had not been decreed to his father in order that the honour might be turned to the destruction of his countrymen. Cassius, the actor, with others of his trade, had regularly taken part in the games which his own mother had consecrated to the memory of Augustus; nor was it an act of sacrilege, if the effigies of that sovereign, like other images of other gods, went with the property, whenever a house or garden was sold. As to the perjury, it was on the same footing as if the defendant had taken the name of Jupiter in vain: the gods must look to their own wrongs. 1.76.  In the same year, the Tiber, rising under the incessant rains, had flooded the lower levels of the city, and its subsidence was attended by much destruction of buildings and life. Accordingly, Asinius Gallus moved for a reference to the Sibylline Books. Tiberius objected, preferring secrecy as in earth so in heaven: still, the task of coercing the stream was entrusted to Ateius Capito and Lucius Arruntius. Since Achaia and Macedonia protested against the heavy taxation, it was decided to relieve them of their proconsular government for the time being and transfer them to the emperor. A show of gladiators, given in the name of his brother Germanicus, was presided over by Drusus, who took an extravagant pleasure in the shedding of blood however vile — a trait so alarming to the populace that it was said to have been censured by his father. Tiberius' own absence from the exhibition was variously explained. Some ascribed it to his impatience of a crowd; others, to his native morosity and his dread of comparisons; for Augustus had been a good-humoured spectator. I should be slow to believe that he deliberately furnished his son with an occasion for exposing his brutality and arousing the disgust of the nation; yet even this was suggested. 1.78.1.  Permission to build a temple of Augustus in the colony of Tarraco was granted to the Spaniards, and a precedent set for all the provinces. A popular protest against the one per cent duty on auctioned goods (which had been imposed after the Civil Wars) brought from Tiberius a declaration that "the military exchequer was dependent on that resource; moreover, the commonwealth was not equal to the burden, unless the veterans were discharged only at the end of twenty years' service." Thus the misconceived reforms of the late mutiny, in virtue of which the legionaries had extorted a maximum term of sixteen years, were cancelled for the future. 2.44.1.  Shortly afterwards, Drusus was despatched to Illyricum, in order to serve his apprentice­ship to war and acquire the favour of the army. At the same time, Tiberius believed that the young prince, who was running riot among the extravagances of the capital, was better in camp, and that he himself would be all the safer with both his sons at the head of legions. The pretext, however, was a Suebian request for help against the Cherusci: for, now that the Romans had withdrawn and the foreign menace was removed, the tribes — obedient to the national custom, and embittered in this case by their rivalry in prestige — had turned their weapons against each other. The power of the clans and the prowess of their leaders were upon a level; but while his kingly title rendered Maroboduus unpopular with his countrymen, Arminius aroused enthusiasm as the champion of liberty.
5. Tacitus, Histories, 2.78.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 57.15.4-57.15.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

57.15.4.  This was one instance of inconsistency on his part; another was seen in his treatment of Lucius Scribonius Libo, a young noble suspected of revolutionary designs. So long as this man was well, he did not bring him to trial, but when he became sick unto death, he caused him to be brought into the senate in a covered litter, such as the wives of the senators use; 57.15.5.  then, when there was a slight delay and Libo committed suicide before his trial could come off, he passed judgment upon him after his death, gave his money to his accusers, and caused sacrifices to be offered to commemorate the man's death, not only on his own account, but also on that of Augustus and of the latter's father Julius, as had been decreed in past times.
7. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.129.2



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexandria Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 51
ambition Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
anger Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
appuleia varilla Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50
astrologers, as criminal charge Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 51
ateius capito, as praiseworthy Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 186
athens Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50
augurs Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 186
augustus, c. iulius caesar octavianus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
augustus, divus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50, 51, 55, 56
augustus, temples of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50
banquets Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
capitoline hill, role in triumphal procession Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 56
clodius quirinalis, p. palpellius Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
cotta, m. aurelius Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
cotta, m. aurelius maximus messalinus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
cruelty Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
cultic commemoration Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50
decline, of religion Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 186
delatores Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 55
dissimulation Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 55
drusus, iulius caesar Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
emperor cult Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 56
faianius Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50, 51, 56
family, imperial Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 56
firmius catus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 51
flamen of augustus, dialis Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 186
floods Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50
germanicus, triumph of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 56
haterius antoninus, quintus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
idleness Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
jupiter optimus maximus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 56
lascivia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
lex oppia Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
libo drusus Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50, 51, 55, 56
lust vii Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
maecenas, c. clinius Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
magic and magi Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 51
maiestas Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50, 51, 55, 56
mausoleum of augustus, medicine, language of Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 55
memory, cultic, maiestas and Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50, 51, 55, 56
nero caesar Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 186
nero claudius caesar augustus germanicus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
papinius, sextus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
perversion Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
pleasure Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
pompey Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 51
pontifices, appointed Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 186
priests, (mis-)appointments Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 186
prodigality Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
rubrius Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50, 51, 56
sacrifice Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 56
scaevinus, flavius Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
senate, failure of expertise Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 186
senate, flattery of emperor by Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50
senate, responsible for cultus deorum Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 186
sulla, l. cornelius Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
sumptuary laws Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
superstitio Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 51
sycophancy, of senate Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 186
tiber Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 50
tiberius, iulius caesar augustus Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
tigellinus, ofonius Romana Berno, Roman Luxuria: A Literary and Cultural History (2023) 215
triumphs' Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 56
vespasian Shannon-Henderson, Power Play in Latin Love Elegy and its Multiple Forms of Continuity in Ovid’s (2019) 51