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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10588
Tacitus, Annals, 15.44.6
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Suetonius, Nero, 16.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Tacitus, Annals, 6.28, 11.14, 15.44.3-15.44.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6.28.  In the consulate of Paulus Fabius and Lucius Vitellius, after a long period of ages, the bird known as the phoenix visited Egypt, and supplied the learned of that country and of Greece with the material for long disquisitions on the miracle. I propose to state the points on which they coincide, together with the larger number that are dubious, yet not too absurd for notice. That the creature is sacred to the sun and distinguished from other birds by its head and the variegation of its plumage, is agreed by those who have depicted its form: as to its term of years, the tradition varies. The generally received number is five hundred; but there are some who assert that its visits fall at intervals of 1461 years, and that it was in the reigns, first of Sesosis, then of Amasis, and finally of Ptolemy (third of the Macedonian dynasty), that the three earlier phoenixes flew to the city called Heliopolis with a great escort of common birds amazed at the novelty of their appearance. But while antiquity is obscure, between Ptolemy and Tiberius there were less than two hundred and fifty years: whence the belief has been held that this was a spurious phoenix, not originating on the soil of Arabia, and following none of the practices affirmed by ancient tradition. For — so the tale is told — when its sum of years is complete and death is drawing on, it builds a nest in its own country and sheds on it a procreative influence, from which springs a young one, whose first care on reaching maturity is to bury his sire. Nor is that task performed at random, but, after raising a weight of myrrh and proving it by a far flight, so soon as he is a match for his burden and the course before him, he lifts up his father's corpse, conveys him to the Altar of the Sun, and consigns him to the flames. — The details are uncertain and heightened by fable; but that the bird occasionally appears in Egypt is unquestioned.
3. Tacitus, Histories, 1.86.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96-10.97 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 10.96-10.97 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abominations, crimes, flagitia de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 109, 148
dream, credibility Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
foreign, rites Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
foreigners, and religion Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
fors, and the gods Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
fors, as detail Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
fors, fors as category Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
fors, forte Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
fors, in tacitus Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
gods, benevolence Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
gods, intervention Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
government de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 109
hostility to christians de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 108
hostility towards de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 108, 109
james the just de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 108
last, hugh de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 148
name de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 148
nature, and chance Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
nature, and prodigies Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
nero, emperor de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 108, 109
pliny the younger de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 108, 148
poppaea sabina de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 109
provoke jews de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 108
rome de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 108, 148
sherwin-white, a.n. de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 148
stephen, protomartyr de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 108
suetonius de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 108, 148
superstitio' Davies, Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods (2004) 170
superstitio, superstition de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 148
tacitus de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 108, 148
trajan de Ste. Croix et al., Christian Persecution, Martyrdom, and Orthodoxy (2006) 148