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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10588
Tacitus, Annals, 15.23


Memmio Regulo et Verginio Rufo consulibus natam sibi ex Poppaea filiam Nero ultra mortale gaudium accepit appellavitque Augustam dato et Poppaeae eodem cognomento. locus puerperio colonia Antium fuit, ubi ipse generatus erat. iam senatus uterum Poppaeae commendaverat dis votaque publice susceperat, quae multiplicata exolutaque. et additae supplicationes templumque fecunditatis et certamen ad exemplar Actiacae religionis decretum, utque Fortunarum effigies aureae in solio Capitolini Iovis locarentur, ludicrum circense, ut Iuliae genti apud Bovillas, ita Claudiae Domitiaeque apud Antium ederetur. quae fluxa fuere, quartum intra mensem defuncta infante. rursusque exortae adulationes censentium honorem divae et pulvinar aedemque et sacerdotem. atque ipse ut laetitiae, ita maeroris immodicus egit. adnotatum est, omni senatu Antium sub recentem partum effuso, Thraseam prohibitum immoto animo praenuntiam imminentis caedis contumeliam excepisse. secutam dehinc vocem Caesaris ferunt qua reconciliatum se Thraseae apud Senecam iactaverit ac Senecam Caesari gratulatum: unde gloria egregiis viris et pericula gliscebant. In the consulate of Memmius Regulus and Verginius Rufus, Nero greeted a daughter, presented to him by Poppaea, with more than human joy, named the child Augusta, and bestowed the same title on Poppaea. The scene of her delivery was the colony of Antium, where the sovereign himself had seen the light. The senate had already commended the travail of Poppaea to the care of Heaven and formulated vows in the name of the state: they were now multiplied and paid. Public thanksgivings were added, and a Temple of Fertility was decreed, together with a contest on the model of the Actian festival; while golden effigies of the Two Fortunes were to be placed on the throne of Capitoline Jove, and, as the Julian race had its Circus Games at Bovillae, so at Antium should the Claudian and Domitian houses. But all was transitory, as the infant died in less than four months. Then fresh forms of adulation made their appearance, and she was voted the honour of deification, a place in the pulvinar, a temple, and a priest. The emperor, too, showed himself as incontinent in sorrow as in joy. It was noted that when the entire senate streamed towards Antium shortly after the birth, Thrasea, who was forbidden to attend, received the affront, prophetic of his impending slaughter, without emotion. Shortly afterwards, they say, came a remark of the Caesar, in which he boasted to Seneca that he was reconciled to Thrasea; and Seneca congratulated the Caesar: an incident which increased the fame, and the dangers, of those eminent men. <


Memmio Regulo et Verginio Rufo consulibus natam sibi ex Poppaea filiam Nero ultra mortale gaudium accepit appellavitque Augustam dato et Poppaeae eodem cognomento. locus puerperio colonia Antium fuit, ubi ipse generatus erat. iam senatus uterum Poppaeae commendaverat dis votaque publice susceperat, quae multiplicata exolutaque. et additae supplicationes templumque fecunditatis et certamen ad exemplar Actiacae religionis decretum, utque Fortunarum effigies aureae in solio Capitolini Iovis locarentur, ludicrum circense, ut Iuliae genti apud Bovillas, ita Claudiae Domitiaeque apud Antium ederetur. quae fluxa fuere, quartum intra mensem defuncta infante. rursusque exortae adulationes censentium honorem divae et pulvinar aedemque et sacerdotem. atque ipse ut laetitiae, ita maeroris immodicus egit. adnotatum est, omni senatu Antium sub recentem partum effuso, Thraseam prohibitum immoto animo praenuntiam imminentis caedis contumeliam excepisse. secutam dehinc vocem Caesaris ferunt qua reconciliatum se Thraseae apud Senecam iactaverit ac Senecam Caesari gratulatum: unde gloria egregiis viris et pericula gliscebant. In the consulate of Memmius Regulus and Verginius Rufus, Nero greeted a daughter, presented to him by Poppaea, with more than human joy, named the child Augusta, and bestowed the same title on Poppaea. The scene of her delivery was the colony of Antium, where the sovereign himself had seen the light. The senate had already commended the travail of Poppaea to the care of Heaven and formulated vows in the name of the state: they were now multiplied and paid. Public thanksgivings were added, and a Temple of Fertility was decreed, together with a contest on the model of the Actian festival; while golden effigies of the Two Fortunes were to be placed on the throne of Capitoline Jove, and, as the Julian race had its Circus Games at Bovillae, so at Antium should the Claudian and Domitian houses. But all was transitory, as the infant died in less than four months. Then fresh forms of adulation made their appearance, and she was voted the honour of deification, a place in the pulvinar, a temple, and a priest. The emperor, too, showed himself as incontinent in sorrow as in joy. It was noted that when the entire senate streamed towards Antium shortly after the birth, Thrasea, who was forbidden to attend, received the affront, prophetic of his impending slaughter, without emotion. Shortly afterwards, they say, came a remark of the Caesar, in which he boasted to Seneca that he was reconciled to Thrasea; and Seneca congratulated the Caesar: an incident which increased the fame, and the dangers, of those eminent men.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Tacitus, Annals, 4.74, 12.27.1, 13.4.1, 14.10.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.74.  Thus the Frisian name won celebrity in Germany; while Tiberius, rather than entrust anyone with the conduct of the war, suppressed our losses. The senate, too, had other anxieties than a question of national dishonour on the confines of the empire: an internal panic had preoccupied all minds, and the antidote was being sought in sycophancy. Thus, although their opinion was being taken on totally unrelated subjects, they voted an altar of Mercy and an altar of Friendship with statues of the Caesar and Sejanus on either hand, and with reiterated petitions conjured the pair to vouchsafe themselves to sight. Neither of them, however, came down so far as Rome or the neighbourhood of Rome: it was deemed enough to emerge from their isle and present themselves to view on the nearest shore of Campania. To Campania went senators and knights, with a large part of the populace, their anxieties centred round Sejanus; access to whom had grown harder, and had therefore to be procured by interest and by a partnership in his designs. It was evident enough that his arrogance was increased by the sight of this repulsive servility so openly exhibited. At Rome, movement is the rule, and the extent of the city leaves it uncertain upon what errand the passer-by is bent: there, littering without distinction the plain or the beach, they suffered day and night alike the patronage or the insolence of his janitors, until that privilege, too, was vetoed, and they retraced their steps to the capital â€” those whom he had honoured neither by word nor by look, in fear and trembling; a few, over whom hung the fatal issue of that infelicitous friendship, with misplaced cheerfulness of heart. 12.27.1.  Agrippina, on the other hand, in order to advertise her strength to the provinces also, arranged for the plantation of a colony of veterans in the Ubian town where she was born. The settlement received its title from her name; and, as chance would have it, it had been her grandfather Agrippa who extended Roman protection to the tribe on its migration across the Rhine. At the same period, a panic was caused in Upper Germany by an incursion of Chattan marauders. Thereupon, the legate Publius Pomponius sent the auxiliary Vangiones and Nemetes, supported by allied cavalry, with instructions to head off the raiders, or, if they scattered, to envelop and surprise them. The general's plan was seconded by the activity of the troops. They separated into two columns; one of which, marching to the left, entrapped a newly-returned detachment of pillagers, who, after employing their booty in a debauch, were sleeping off the effects. The exultation of the men was heightened by the fact that, after forty years, they had redeemed from slavery a few survivors of the Varian disaster. 13.4.1.  However, when the mockeries of sorrow had been carried to their close, he entered the curia; and, after an opening reference to the authority of the Fathers and the uimity of the army, stated that "he had before him advice and examples pointing him to an admirable system of government. Nor had his youth been poisoned by civil war or family strife: he brought to his task no hatreds, no wrongs, no desire for vengeance. He then outlined the character of the coming principate, the points which had provoked recent and intense dissatisfaction being specially discounteced:— "He would not constitute himself a judge of all cases, secluding accusers and defendants within the same four walls and allowing the influence of a few individuals to run riot. Under his roof would be no venality, no loophole for intrigue: the palace and the state would be things separate. Let the senate retain its old prerogatives! Let Italy and the public provinces take their stand before the judgement-seats of the consuls, and let the consuls grant them access to the Fathers: for the armies delegated to his charge he would himself be responsible.
2. Pseudo-Seneca, Octauia, 534-537, 533



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
(mithraic) Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 233
actor, acting Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
adultery Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
agricola Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
agrippina the younger, empress Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
altars, clementia and amicitia Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267
amicitia Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267
annals Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171
antoninus pius (t. aelius hadrianus antoninus) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222, 223
autocracy, autocrat, tyranny, tyrant Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
bruttia crispina Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
caesaris, temple of, under tiberius Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267
caesaris, temple of Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267
caligula (c. caesar augustus germanicus), divorce of lollia paulina Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
campania Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
caracalla (m. aurellius antoninus) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
childlessness, in imperial family Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207, 222, 223
children, as social capital Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 223
children, on coinage Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222, 223
claudia Brooten, Women Leaders in the Ancient Synagogue (1982) 224
claudius, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
cn. iulius agricola Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171, 243
coinage, diana lucifera motifs Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
coinage, fecunditas motifs Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222, 223
coinage, imperial women on Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222, 223
coinage, juno lucina motifs Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222, 223
commodus (l. aelius aurelius commodus), coinage of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
cornelia salonina (publica licinia iulia cornelia salonina) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
diana lucifera Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
dio cassius Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
divorce, criticisms of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
divorce, infertility and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
domitian, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171, 243
emotion Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
emperor, princeps Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171, 243
emperors, tyrannical stereotypes and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
family, imperial, childlessness within Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207, 222, 223
faustina the elder (annia galeria faustina) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222, 223
faustina the younger (annia galeria faustina), association with juno lucina and diana lucifera Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 223
faustina the younger (annia galeria faustina), on coins of marcus aurelius Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 223
fecunditas, as social capital Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 223
fecunditas Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267
fecunditas (goddess) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222, 223
funeral Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171, 243
gallienus (p. licinius egnatius gallienus) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
germanicus iulius caesar Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
grief, mourning Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
hadrian (p. aelius hadrianus), childlessness of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 223
imitation, emulation, exemplarity, exemplum Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
infertility, divorce and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
infertility, tyranny and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
intratextuality Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171
julia domna (iulia domna) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
juno lucina Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222, 223
legitimacy, legitimation Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171
lollia paulina Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
lucilla (annia aurelia galeria lucilla) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
lucius verus (l. aurelius verus) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
marcia otacilia severa Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
marcus aurelius (m. aurelius antoninus), coinage of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222, 223
matricide Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
mourning, grief Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
nero, emperor Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267; Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171, 243
nero (l. domitius ahenobarbus), and dynastic succession Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
nero (l. domitius ahenobarbus), divorce of octavia Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
nero (l. domitius ahenobarbus), fecunditas, temple to Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
nero (l. domitius ahenobarbus), in the octavia Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
nonius datus Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267
octavia Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
octavia (claudia octavia, wife of nero), alleged infertility of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
octavia (claudia octavia, wife of nero), dynastic succession and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
octavia (claudia octavia, wife of nero), in the octavia Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
oratory Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171, 243
p. clodius thrasea paetus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171
patientia Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267
pax, peace Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171
philippus arabs (m. iulius philippus) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
pignora/pignora pacis Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
plautilla (publia fulvia plautilla) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
poppaea sabina Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207, 222, 223
praise (laus) and blame (uituperatio), moralising Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171
princeps Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171
principate, the roman Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171, 243
principate Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267
propaganda Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267
remarriage, infertility and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
res publica Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171
sacrifice Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 233
sejanus Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267
senate, senators Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171
septimius severus, l. Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222
social capital Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 223
spes, dedications to Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267
succession, imperial, divorce and remarriage Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
succession, imperial, women and maternal line, importance of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
suetonius (c. suetonius tranquillus) Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
t. clodius eprius marcellus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171
tacitus, p. cornelius Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 171, 243
tacitus (p. ? cornelius tacitus), on neros divorce of octavia Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
taurobolium Alvar Ezquerra, Romanising Oriental Gods: Myth, Salvation, and Ethics in the Cults of Cybele, Isis, and Mithras (2008) 233
tears Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
theatre Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
tiberius, emperor Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267; Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
titus, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 243
trajan (m. ulpius traianus, later caesar nerva traianus augustus), childlessness of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 223
tyrants Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
virtus' Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (2007) 267
wives, infertility and divorce Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
women, imperial, as exempla Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
women, imperial, dynastic succession and Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
women, imperial, julio-claudian Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207
women, imperial, on coinage Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 222, 223
women, infertility of Hug, Fertility, Ideology, and the Cultural Politics of Reproduction at Rome (2023) 207