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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10588
Tacitus, Annals, 11.15.1


nanHe next consulted the senate on the question of founding a college of diviners, so that "the oldest art of Italy should not become extinct through their indolence. Often, in periods of public adversity, they had called in diviners, on whose advice religious ceremonies had been renewed and, for the future, observed with greater correctness; while the Etruscan nobles, voluntarily or at the instance of the Roman senate, had kept up the art and propagated it in certain families. Now that work was done more negligently through the public indifference to all liberal accomplishments, combined with the progress of alien superstitions. For the moment, indeed, all was flourishing; but they must show their gratitude to the favour of Heaven by making sure that the sacred rituals observed in the time of hazard were not forgotten in the day of prosperity." A senatorial decree was accordingly passed, instructing the pontiffs to consider what points in the discipline of the haruspices needed to be maintained or strengthened.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 1.119 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.119. Quod ne dubitare possimus, maximo est argumento, quod paulo ante interitum Caesaris contigit. Qui cum immolaret illo die, quo primum in sella aurea sedit et cum purpurea veste processit, in extis bovis opimi cor non fuit. Num igitur censes ullum animal, quod sanguinem habeat, sine corde esse posse? †Qua ille rei novitate perculsus, cum Spurinna diceret timendum esse, ne et consilium et vita deficeret; earum enim rerum utramque a corde proficisci. Postero die caput in iecore non fuit. Quae quidem illi portendebantur a dis immortalibus, ut videret interitum, non ut caveret. Cum igitur eae partes in extis non reperiuntur, sine quibus victuma illa vivere nequisset, intellegendum est in ipso immolationis tempore eas partes, quae absint, interisse. 1.119. Conclusive proof of this fact, sufficient to put it beyond the possibility of doubt, is afforded by incidents which happened just before Caesars death. While he was offering sacrifices on the day when he sat for the first time on a golden throne and first appeared in public in a purple robe, no heart was found in the vitals of the votive ox. Now do you think it possible for any animal that has blood to exist without a heart? Caesar was unmoved by this occurrence, even though Spurinna warned him to beware lest thought and life should fail him — both of which, he said, proceeded from the heart. On the following day there was no head to the liver of the sacrifice. These portents were sent by the immortal gods to Caesar that he might foresee his death, not that he might prevent it. Therefore, when those organs, without which the victim could not have lived, are found wanting in the vitals, we should understand that the absent organs disappeared at the very moment of immolation. [53]
2. Cicero, Letters To His Friends, 6.6.8 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Pro Flacco, 69, 67 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

67. Italia et ex omnibus nostris provinciis Hierosolymam exportari soleret, Flaccus sanxit edicto ne ex Asia exportari liceret. quis est, iudices, qui hoc non vere laudare possit? exportari aurum non oportere cum saepe antea senatus tum me consule gravissime iudicavit. huic autem barbarae superstitioni resistere severitatis, multitudinem Iudaeorum flagrantem non numquam in contionibus pro re publica contemnere gravitatis summae fuit. at Cn. Pompeius captis Hierosolymis victor ex illo fano nihil attigit.
4. New Testament, Acts, 18.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18.2. He found a certain Jew named Aquila, a man of Pontus by race, who had recently come from Italy, with his wife Priscilla, because Claudius had commanded all the Jews to depart from Rome. He came to them
5. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 108.22 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Suetonius, Claudius, 25.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Tacitus, Annals, 1.7, 2.32.1, 3.19, 5.8, 6.7.3, 12.8.2, 13.24.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.7.  At Rome, however, consuls, senators, and knights were rushing into slavery. The more exalted the personage, the grosser his hypocrisy and his haste, — his lineaments adjusted so as to betray neither cheerfulness at the exit nor undue depression at the entry of a prince; his tears blent with joy, his regrets with adulation. The consuls, Sextus Pompeius and Sextus Appuleius, first took the oath of allegiance to Tiberius Caesar. It was taken in their presence by Seius Strabo and Caius Turranius, chiefs respectively of the praetorian cohorts and the corn department. The senators, the soldiers, and the populace followed. For in every action of Tiberius the first step had to be taken by the consuls, as though the old republic were in being, and himself undecided whether to reign or no. Even his edict, convening the Fathers to the senate-house was issued simply beneath the tribunician title which he had received under Augustus. It was a laconic document of very modest purport:— "He intended to provide for the last honours to his father, whose body he could not leave — it was the one function of the state which he made bold to exercise." Yet, on the passing of Augustus he had given the watchword to the praetorian cohorts as Imperator; he had the sentries, the men-at‑arms, and the other appurteces of a court; soldiers conducted him to the forum, soldiers to the curia; he dispatched letters to the armies as if the principate was already in his grasp; and nowhere manifested the least hesitation, except when speaking in the senate. The chief reason was his fear that Germanicus — backed by so many legions, the vast reserves of the provinces, and a wonderful popularity with the nation — might prefer the ownership to the reversion of a throne. He paid public opinion, too, the compliment of wishing to be regarded as the called and chosen of the state, rather than as the interloper who had wormed his way into power with the help of connubial intrigues and a senile act of adoption. It was realized later that his coyness had been assumed with the further object of gaining an insight into the feelings of the aristocracy: for all the while he was distorting words and looks into crimes and storing them in his memory. 2.32.1.  His estate was parcelled out among the accusers, and extraordinary praetor­ships were conferred on those of senatorial status. Cotta Messalinus then moved that the effigy of Libo should not accompany the funeral processions of his descendants; Gnaeus Lentulus, that no member of the Scribonian house should adopt the surname of Drusus. Days of public thanksgiving were fixed at the instance of Pomponius Flaccus. Lucius Piso, Asinius Gallus, Papius Mutilus, and Lucius Apronius procured a decree that votive offerings should be made to Jupiter, Mars, and Concord; and that the thirteenth of September, the anniversary of Libo's suicide, should rank as a festival. This union of sounding names and sycophancy I have recorded as showing how long that evil has been rooted in the State. â€” Other resolutions of the senate ordered the expulsion of the astrologers and magic-mongers from Italy. One of their number, Lucius Pituanius, was flung from the Rock; another — Publius Marcius — was executed by the consuls outside the Esquiline Gate according to ancient usage and at sound of trumpet. 3.19.  A few days later, the Caesar recommended the senate to confer priesthoods on Vitellius, Veranius, and Servaeus. To Fulcinius he promised his support, should he become a candidate for preferment, but warned him not to let impetuosity become the downfall of eloquence. This closed the punitive measures demanded by Germanicus' death: an affair which, not only to the generation which witnessed it, but in the succeeding years, was a battle-ground of opposing rumours. So true it is that the great event is an obscure event: one school admits all hearsay evidence, whatever its character, as indisputable; another perverts the truth into its contrary; and, in each case, posterity magnifies the error. Drusus, who had left the capital, in order to regularize his command, entered it shortly afterwards with an ovation. A few days later, his mother Vipsania died — the only one of all Agrippa's children whose end was peace. The rest perished, part, it is known, by the sword, part, it was believed, by poison or starvation.
8. Tacitus, Histories, 1.18.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 60.6.6 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

60.6.6.  As for the Jews, who had again increased so greatly that by reason of their multitude it would have been hard without raising a tumult to bar them from the city, he did not drive them out, but ordered them, while continuing their traditional mode of life, not to hold meetings. He also disbanded the clubs, which had been reintroduced by Gaius.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
britons,offered human sacrifice Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 467
caecina,a. Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 108
chrestus Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 458
claudius,his treatment of the jews in rome Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 458
decline,of religion Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 187
etruria Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 108
expiation Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 187
germans,religion of Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 467
haruspices Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 187
haruspicy,decline Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 187
incest Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 187
jewish religion,antiquity of Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 467
jewish religion,barbara superstitio Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 467
jews,expelled from rome Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 458
julius caesar,c.,and haruspicy Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 108
julius caesar,c. Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 108
lightning,as prodigy Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 187
omens Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 187
pontifices,give remedies Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 187
priests,(mis-)appointments' Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 187
primitive peoples\r\n,human sacrifice offered by Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 458
prodigy,caesar and Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 108
quintus (character of div.) Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 108
religion,and the roman state Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 458
senate Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 108
seneca,on environmental determinism,on jews Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 458
signs Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 108
superstition Isaac (2004), The invention of racism in classical antiquity, 467
tarquinia Santangelo (2013), Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond, 108
tiberius,emperor,and informers Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 187
tiberius,emperor,undermines religion Davies (2004), Rome's Religious History: Livy, Tacitus and Ammianus on their Gods, 187