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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10524
Suetonius, Vespasianus, 18


nan He was the first to establish a regular salary of a hundred thousand sesterces for Latin and Greek teachers of rhetoric, paid from the privy purse. He also presented eminent poets with princely largess and great rewards, and artists, too, such as the restorer of the Venus of Cos and of the Colossus. To a mechanical engineer, who promised to transport some heavy columns to the Capitol at small expense, he gave no mean reward for his invention, but refused to make use of it, saying: "You must let me feed my poor commons.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

28 results
1. Ennius, Annales, 363 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.1.55, 2.4.79, 2.4.120-2.4.121 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Dionysius of Halycarnassus, Roman Antiquities, 4.40.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.40.7.  And it was made clear by another prodigy that this man was dear to the gods; in consequence of which that fabulous and incredible opinion I have already mentioned concerning his birth also came to be regarded by many as true. For in the temple of Fortune which he himself had built there stood a gilded wooden statue of Tullius, and when a conflagration occurred and everything else was destroyed, this statue alone remained uninjured by the flames. And even to this day, although the temple itself and all the objects in it, which were restored to their formed condition after the fire, are obviously the products of modern art, the statue, as aforetime, is of ancient workmanship; for it still remains an object of veneration by the Romans. Concerning Tullius these are all the facts that have been handed down to us.
4. Livy, History, 23.30.13, 23.31.9, 24.47.15, 33.27.4, 38.9, 38.43.5, 42.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Ovid, Fasti, 6.569-6.572, 6.613-6.625 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6.569. Day, doubled the enemy’s strength. 6.570. Fortuna, the same day is yours, your temple 6.571. Founded by the same king, in the same place. 6.572. And whose is that statue hidden under draped robes? 6.613. Yet she still dared to visit her father’s temple 6.614. His monument: what I tell is strange but true. 6.615. There was a statue enthroned, an image of Servius: 6.616. They say it put a hand to its eyes 6.617. And a voice was heard: ‘Hide my face 6.618. Lest it view my own wicked daughter.’ 6.619. It was veiled by cloth, Fortune refused to let the robe 6.620. Be removed, and she herself spoke from her temple: 6.621. ‘The day when Servius’ face is next revealed 6.622. Will be a day when shame is cast aside.’ 6.623. Women, beware of touching the forbidden cloth 6.624. (It’s sufficient to utter prayers in solemn tones) 6.625. And let him who was the City’s seventh king
6. Strabo, Geography, 7.6.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.6.1. Pontic seaboard The remainder of the country between the Ister and the mountains on either side of Paeonia consists of that part of the Pontic seaboard which extends from the Sacred Mouth of the Ister as far as the mountainous country in the neighborhood of the Haemus and as far as the mouth at Byzantium. And just as, in traversing the Illyrian seaboard, I proceeded as far as the Ceraunian Mountains, because, although they fall outside the mountainous country of Illyria, they afford an appropriate limit, and just as I determined the positions of the tribes of the interior by these mountains, because I thought that marks of this kind would be more significant as regards both the description at hand and what was to follow, so also in this case the seaboard, even though it falls beyond the mountain-line, will nevertheless end at an appropriate limit — the mouth of the Pontus — as regards both the description at hand and that which comes next in order. So, then, if one begins at the Sacred Mouth of the Ister and keeps the continuous seaboard on the right, one comes, at a distance of five hundred stadia, to a small town, Ister, founded by the Milesians; then, at a distance of two hundred and fifty stadia, to a second small town, Tomis; then, at two hundred and eighty stadia, to a city Callatis, a colony of the Heracleotae; then, at one thousand three hundred stadia, to Apollonia, a colony of the Milesians. The greater part of Apollonia was founded on a certain isle, where there is a sanctuary of Apollo, from which Marcus Lucullus carried off the colossal statue of Apollo, a work of Calamis, which he set up in the Capitolium. In the interval between Callatis and Apollonia come also Bizone, of which a considerable part was engulfed by earthquakes, Cruni, Odessus, a colony of the Milesians, and Naulochus, a small town of the Mesembriani. Then comes the Haemus Mountain, which reaches the sea here; then Mesembria, a colony of the Megarians, formerly called Menebria (that is, city of Menas, because the name of its founder was Menas, while bria is the word for city in the Thracian language. In this way, also, the city of Selys is called Selybria and Aenus was once called Poltyobria). Then come Anchiale, a small town belonging to the Apolloniatae, and Apollonia itself. On this coast-line is Cape Tirizis, a stronghold, which Lysimachus once used as a treasury. Again, from Apollonia to the Cyaneae the distance is about one thousand five hundred stadia; and in the interval are Thynias, a territory belonging to the Apolloniatae (Anchiale, which also belongs to the Apolloniatae), and also Phinopolis and Andriake, which border on Salmydessus. Salmydessus is a desert and stony beach, harborless and wide open to the north winds, and in length extends as far as the Cyaneae, a distance of about seven hundred stadia; and all who are cast ashore on this beach are plundered by the Astae, a Thracian tribe who are situated above it. The Cyaneae are two islets near the mouth of the Pontus, one close to Europe and the other to Asia; they are separated by a channel of about twenty stadia and are twenty stadia distant both from the sanctuary of the Byzantines and from the sanctuary of the Chalcedonians. And this is the narrowest part of the mouth of the Euxine, for when one proceeds only ten stadia farther one comes to a headland which makes the strait only five stadia in width, and then the strait opens to a greater width and begins to form the Propontis.
7. Vergil, Aeneis, 5.704 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.704. of game and contest, summoned to his side
8. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 20.219-20.222 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

20.219. 7. And now it was that the temple was finished. So when the people saw that the workmen were unemployed, who were above eighteen thousand and that they, receiving no wages, were in want because they had earned their bread by their labors about the temple; 20.221. These cloisters belonged to the outer court, and were situated in a deep valley, and had walls that reached four hundred cubits [in length], and were built of square and very white stones, the length of each of which stones was twenty cubits, and their height six cubits. This was the work of king Solomon, who first of all built the entire temple. 20.222. But king Agrippa, who had the care of the temple committed to him by Claudius Caesar, considering that it is easy to demolish any building, but hard to build it up again, and that it was particularly hard to do it to these cloisters, which would require a considerable time, and great sums of money, he denied the petitioners their request about that matter; but he did not obstruct them when they desired the city might be paved with white stone.
9. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 2.576-2.583, 3.1-3.5, 3.34, 3.59, 3.62, 3.68, 3.79-3.83, 3.85, 3.93, 3.104 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2.576. He also got together an army out of Galilee, of more than a hundred thousand young men, all of which he armed with the old weapons which he had collected together and prepared for them. 2.577. 7. And when he had considered that the Roman power became invincible, chiefly by their readiness in obeying orders, and the constant exercise of their arms, he despaired of teaching these his men the use of their arms, which was to be obtained by experience; but observing that their readiness in obeying orders was owing to the multitude of their officers, he made his partitions in his army more after the Roman manner, and appointed a great many subalterns. 2.578. He also distributed the soldiers into various classes, whom he put under captains of tens, and captains of hundreds, and then under captains of thousands; and besides these, he had commanders of larger bodies of men. 2.579. He also taught them to give the signals one to another, and to call and recall the soldiers by the trumpets, how to expand the wings of an army, and make them wheel about; and when one wing hath had success, to turn again and assist those that were hard set, and to join in the defense of what had most suffered. 2.581. He told them that he should make trial of the good order they would observe in war, even before it came to any battle, in case they would abstain from the crimes they used to indulge themselves in, such as theft, and robbery, and rapine, and from defrauding their own countrymen, and never to esteem the harm done to those that were so near of kin to them to be any advantage to themselves; 2.582. for that wars are then managed the best when the warriors preserve a good conscience; but that such as are ill men in private life will not only have those for enemies which attack them, but God himself also for their antagonist. 2.583. 8. And thus did he continue to admonish them. Now he chose for the war such an army as was sufficient, i.e. sixty thousand footmen, and two hundred and fifty horsemen; and besides these, on which he put the greatest trust, there were about four thousand five hundred mercenaries; he had also six hundred men as guards of his body. 3.1. 1. When Nero was informed of the Romans’ ill success in Judea, a concealed consternation and terror, as is usual in such cases, fell upon him; although he openly looked very big, and was very angry 3.1. They also esteem any errors they commit upon taking counsel beforehand to be better than such rash success as is owing to fortune only; because such a fortuitous advantage tempts them to be inconsiderate, while consultation, though it may sometimes fail of success, hath this good in it, that it makes men more careful hereafter; 3.1. This is an ancient city that is distant from Jerusalem five hundred and twenty furlongs, and was always an enemy to the Jews; on which account they determined to make their first effort against it, and to make their approaches to it as near as possible. 3.2. and said that what had happened was rather owing to the negligence of the commander, than to any valor of the enemy: and as he thought it fit for him, who bare the burden of the whole empire, to despise such misfortunes, he now pretended so to do, and to have a soul superior to all such sad accidents whatsoever. Yet did the disturbance that was in his soul plainly appear by the solicitude he was in [how to recover his affairs again]. 3.2. That he did not see what advantage he could bring to them now, by staying among them, but only provoke the Romans to besiege them more closely, as esteeming it a most valuable thing to take him; but that if they were once informed that he was fled out of the city, they would greatly remit of their eagerness against it. 3.2. and the greater part of the remainder were wounded, with Niger, their remaining general, who fled away together to a small city of Idumea, called Sallis. 3.3. 2. And as he was deliberating to whom he should commit the care of the East, now it was in so great a commotion, and who might be best able to punish the Jews for their rebellion, and might prevent the same distemper from seizing upon the neighboring nations also,— 3.3. So he came quickly to the city, and put his army in order, and set Trajan over the left wing, while he had the right himself, and led them to the siege: 3.3. At this city also the inhabitants of Sepphoris of Galilee met him, who were for peace with the Romans. 3.4. he found no one but Vespasian equal to the task, and able to undergo the great burden of so mighty a war, seeing he was growing an old man already in the camp, and from his youth had been exercised in warlike exploits: he was also a man that had long ago pacified the west, and made it subject to the Romans, when it had been put into disorder by the Germans; he had also recovered to them Britain by his arms 3.4. “Thou, O Vespasian, thinkest no more than that thou hast taken Josephus himself captive; but I come to thee as a messenger of greater tidings; for had not I been sent by God to thee, I knew what was the law of the Jews in this case? and how it becomes generals to die. 3.4. its length is also from Meloth to Thella, a village near to Jordan. 3.5. which had been little known before whereby he procured to his father Claudius to have a triumph bestowed on him without any sweat or labor of his own. 3.5. and for those rivers which they have, all their waters are exceedingly sweet: by reason also of the excellent grass they have, their cattle yield more milk than do those in other places; and, what is the greatest sign of excellency and of abundance, they each of them are very full of people. 3.5. There was also a great slaughter made in the city, while those foreigners that had not fled away already made opposition; but the natural inhabitants were killed without fighting: for in hopes of Titus’s giving them his right hand for their security, and out of a consciousness that they had not given any consent to the war, they avoided fighting 3.34. 1. And now the Romans searched for Josephus, both out of the hatred they bore him, and because their general was very desirous to have him taken; for he reckoned that if he were once taken, the greatest part of the war would be over. They then searched among the dead, and looked into the most concealed recesses of the city; 3.34. And indeed the danger of losing Sepphoris would be no small one, in this war that was now beginning, seeing it was the largest city of Galilee, and built in a place by nature very strong, and might be a security of the whole nation’s [fidelity to the Romans]. 3.59. 1. Now the auxiliaries which were sent to assist the people of Sepphoris, being a thousand horsemen, and six thousand footmen, under Placidus the tribune, pitched their camp in two bodies in the great plain. The footmen were put into the city to be a guard to it, but the horsemen lodged abroad in the camp. 3.62. By this means he provoked the Romans to treat the country according to the law of war; nor did the Romans, out of the anger they bore at this attempt, leave off, either by night or by day, burning the places in the plain, and stealing away the cattle that were in the country, and killing whatsoever appeared capable of fighting perpetually, and leading the weaker people as slaves into captivity; 3.68. There were also a considerable number of auxiliaries got together, that came from the kings Antiochus, and Agrippa, and Sohemus, each of them contributing one thousand footmen that were archers, and a thousand horsemen. Malchus also, the king of Arabia, sent a thousand horsemen, besides five thousand footmen, the greatest part of which were archers; 3.79. 2. As for what is within the camp, it is set apart for tents, but the outward circumference hath the resemblance to a wall, and is adorned with towers at equal distances 3.81. They also erect four gates, one at every side of the circumference, and those large enough for the entrance of the beasts, and wide enough for making excursions, if occasion should require. 3.82. They divide the camp within into streets, very conveniently, and place the tents of the commanders in the middle; but in the very midst of all is the general’s own tent, in the nature of a temple 3.83. insomuch, that it appears to be a city built on the sudden, with its marketplace, and place for handicraft trades, and with seats for the officers superior and inferior, where, if any differences arise, their causes are heard and determined. 3.85. 3. When they have thus secured themselves, they live together by companies, with quietness and decency, as are all their other affairs managed with good order and security. Each company hath also their wood, and their corn, and their water brought them, when they stand in need of them; 3.93. 5. When, after this, they are gone out of their camp, they all march without noise, and in a decent manner, and every one keeps his own rank, as if they were going to war. The footmen are armed with breastplates and headpieces, and have swords on each side; 3.104. and the readiness of obeying their commanders is so great, that it is very ornamental in peace; but when they come to a battle, the whole army is but one body
10. Josephus Flavius, Against Apion, 1.50 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Josephus Flavius, Life, 363 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 33.112, 34.30, 35.66 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Plutarch, Pericles, 12.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12.5. And it was true that his military expeditions supplied those who were in the full vigor of manhood with abundant resources from the common funds, and in his desire that the unwarlike throng of common laborers should neither have no share at all in the public receipts, nor yet get fees for laziness and idleness, he boldly suggested to the people projects for great constructions, and designs for works which would call many arts into play and involve long periods of time, in order that the stay-at-homes, no whit less than the sailors and sentinels and soldiers, might have a pretext for getting a beneficial share of the public wealth.
14. Quintilian, Institutes of Oratory, 12.10.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.10.9.  On the other hand, Phidias is regarded as more gifted in his representation of gods station of men, and indeed for chryselephantine statues he is without a peer, as he would in truth be, even if he had produced nothing in this material beyond his Minerva at Athens and his Jupiter at Olympia in Elis, whose beauty is such that it is said to have added something even to the awe with which the god was already regarded: so perfectly did the majesty of the work give the impression of godhead. Lysippus and Praxiteles are asserted to be supreme as regards faithfulness to nature. For Demetrius is blamed for carrying realism too far, and is less concerned about the beauty than the truth of his work.
15. Quintilian, Institutio Oratoria, 12.10.9 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.10.9.  On the other hand, Phidias is regarded as more gifted in his representation of gods station of men, and indeed for chryselephantine statues he is without a peer, as he would in truth be, even if he had produced nothing in this material beyond his Minerva at Athens and his Jupiter at Olympia in Elis, whose beauty is such that it is said to have added something even to the awe with which the god was already regarded: so perfectly did the majesty of the work give the impression of godhead. Lysippus and Praxiteles are asserted to be supreme as regards faithfulness to nature. For Demetrius is blamed for carrying realism too far, and is less concerned about the beauty than the truth of his work.
16. Suetonius, Iulius, 42 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Suetonius, Vespasianus, 21-23, 17 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Tacitus, Annals, 16.21 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16.21.  After the slaughter of so many of the noble, Nero in the end conceived the ambition to extirpate virtue herself by killing Thrasea Paetus and Barea Soranus. To both he was hostile from of old, and against Thrasea there were additional motives; for he had walked out of the senate, as I have mentioned, during the discussion on Agrippina, and at the festival of the Juvenalia his services had not been conspicuous — a grievance which went the deeper that in Patavium, his native place, the same Thrasea had sung in tragic costume at the . . . Games instituted by the Trojan Antenor. Again, on the day when sentence of death was all but passed on the praetor Antistius for his lampoons on Nero, he proposed, and carried, a milder penalty; and, after deliberately absenting himself from the vote of divine honours to Poppaea, he had not assisted at her funeral. These memories were kept from fading by Cossutianus Capito. For, apart from his character with its sharp trend to crime, he was embittered against Thrasea, whose influence, exerted in support of the Cilician envoys prosecuting Capito for extortion, had cost him the verdict.
19. Tacitus, Histories, 2.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.5.  Vespasian was energetic in war. He used to march at the head of his troops, select a place for camp, oppose the enemy night and day with wise strategy and, if occasion demanded, with his own hands. His food was whatever chance offered; in his dress and bearing he hardly differed from the common soldier. He would have been quite equal to the generals of old if he had not been avaricious. Mucianus, on the other hand, was eminent for his magnificence and wealth and by the complete superiority of his scale of life to that of a private citizen. He was the readier speaker, experienced in civil administration and in statesmanship. It would have been a rare combination for an emperor if the faults of the two could have been done away with and their virtues only combined in one man. But Mucianus was governor of Syria, Vespasian of Judea. They had quarrelled through jealousy because they governed neighbouring provinces. Finally at Nero's death they had laid aside their hostilities and consulted together, at first through friends as go-betweens; and then Titus, the chief bond of their concord, had ended their dangerous feud by pointing out their common interests; both by his nature and skill he was well calculated to win over even a person of the character of Mucianus. Tribunes, centurions, and the common soldiers were secured for the cause by industry or by licence, by virtues or by pleasures, according to the individual's character.
20. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 1.8.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

21. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 66.15.1, 75.4.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

22. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 4.16 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.16. To Valerius Paulinus. Rejoice, rejoice, rejoice, on my account, on your own, and on that of the public. The profession of oratory is still held in honour. Just recently, when I had to speak in the court of the centumviri, I could find no way in except by crossing the tribunal and passing through the judges, all the other places were so crowded and thronged. Moreover, a certain young man of fashion who had his tunic torn to pieces - as often happens in a crowd - kept his ground for seven long hours with only his toga thrown round him. For my speech lasted all that time; and though it cost me a great effort, the results were more than worth it. Let us therefore prosecute our studies, and not allow the idleness of other people to be an excuse for laziness on our part. We can still find an audience and readers, provided only that our compositions are worth hearing, and worth the paper they are written on. Farewell.
23. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 4.16 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.16. To Valerius Paulinus. Rejoice, rejoice, rejoice, on my account, on your own, and on that of the public. The profession of oratory is still held in honour. Just recently, when I had to speak in the court of the centumviri, I could find no way in except by crossing the tribunal and passing through the judges, all the other places were so crowded and thronged. Moreover, a certain young man of fashion who had his tunic torn to pieces - as often happens in a crowd - kept his ground for seven long hours with only his toga thrown round him. For my speech lasted all that time; and though it cost me a great effort, the results were more than worth it. Let us therefore prosecute our studies, and not allow the idleness of other people to be an excuse for laziness on our part. We can still find an audience and readers, provided only that our compositions are worth hearing, and worth the paper they are written on. Farewell.
24. Tatian, Oration To The Greeks, 25.1, 25.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

25. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.12.16 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

26. Macrobius, Saturnalia, 1.12.16 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

27. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Hadrian, 19.12-19.13 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

28. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 8.721 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actors Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 41
aediles Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
aemilius paullus, m., triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
aeneas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
apollo, colossus of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
apollonia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
apprenticeships Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 185
athena Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
augustus, augustan Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
augustus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
boeotia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
building industry Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 185
caesar Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
care of sacred objects, appoint tresviri Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
care of sacred objects Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
censors, role in construction Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
citizenship, political rights Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
corbulo Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 50
domitian Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
domitian\n, in josephus Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 50, 63
domus Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 185
duumviri aedi dedicandae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
educated, erudite Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
ennius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
ephesus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
eretria Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
ethics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
fabius maximus, q. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40, 299
fulvius nobilior, m., adorns the temple of hercules musarum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
fulvius nobilior, m., conquers ambracia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
fulvius nobilior, m., his triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
galilee Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 50, 63
gladiators Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 41
greece Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
greeks Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 41
hadrian Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
helvidius priscus Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
humiliores Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
insulae Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 185
intellectuals, migration of Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 41
iulium sidus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
josephus fides in Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 50, 63
jupiter, capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
justin Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
labour market Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 185, 188
libraries Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
licinius lucullus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
lucretius gallus, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
marcus aurelius Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
mysians Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
nautii Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
nero, colossus of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
nero Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 50
nerva Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
objects, restoration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
objects, their public versus private context Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
otacilius crassus, t. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
paetus thrasea Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
patronage Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 41
performers Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 41
persecution, martyrs Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
perseus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
pertinax Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
polygnotus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
pompey the great Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
possessions, wealth Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
praxiteles, and the venus of cos Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
private versus public Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
privileges Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
propaedeutic Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
provincials, immigrants Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
pyrrhus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
quinctius flamininus, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
quintilian Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
rhetoric (study) Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
rome, temple of divus augustus, victoria in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
rome, temple of hercules musarum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus, cult statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
rome, temple of mens Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
rome, temple of venus eryx Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
schools Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
seasonal migration Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 41
senator, senatorial Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
septimius severus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
simulacrum versus signum, of wood Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
skilled labour Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 185, 188
slave gangs Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 188
social advancement Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
socially elevated Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
statuary, colossal Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
statuary, restoration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299
stertinius, l. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
stoicism, stoics Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
syria Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 50
taxes Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
teachers Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
temporary labour migration Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 41
terentius varro lucullus, m. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
titus and fides, in josephus Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 50, 63
transport sector Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 188
unskilled labour Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 185, 188
verres, c. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 40
vespasian' Lampe, Christians at Rome in the First Two Centuries: From Paul to Valentinus (2003) 281
vespasian, in josephus Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 50, 63
vespasian, patronizes artists Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 299