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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10524
Suetonius, Vespasianus, 12


nan In other matters he was unassuming and lenient from the very beginning of his reign until its end, never trying to conceal his former lowly condition, but often even parading it. Indeed, when certain men tried to trace the origin of the Flavian family to the founders of Reate and a companion of Hercules whose tomb still stands on the Via Salaria, he laughed at them for their pains. So far was he from a desire for pomp and show, that on the day of his triumph, he did not hesitate to say: "It serves me right for being such a fool as to want a triumph in my old age, as if it were due to my ancestors or had ever been among my own ambitions." He did not even assume the tribunician power at once nor the title of Father of his Country until late. As for the custom of searching those who came to pay their morning calls, he gave that up before the civil war was over.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

24 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 3.146-3.155 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.146. /and with speed they came to the place where were the Scaean gates. 3.147. /and with speed they came to the place where were the Scaean gates. 3.148. /and with speed they came to the place where were the Scaean gates. 3.149. /and with speed they came to the place where were the Scaean gates. And they that were about Priam and Panthous and Thymoetes and Lampus and Clytius and Hicetaon, scion of Ares, and Ucalegon and Antenor, men of prudence both, sat as elders of the people at the Scaean gates. 3.150. /Because of old age had they now ceased from battle, but speakers they were full good, like unto cicalas that in a forest sit upon a tree and pour forth their lily-like voice; even in such wise sat the leaders of the Trojans upon the wall. Now when they saw Helen coming upon the wall 3.151. /Because of old age had they now ceased from battle, but speakers they were full good, like unto cicalas that in a forest sit upon a tree and pour forth their lily-like voice; even in such wise sat the leaders of the Trojans upon the wall. Now when they saw Helen coming upon the wall 3.152. /Because of old age had they now ceased from battle, but speakers they were full good, like unto cicalas that in a forest sit upon a tree and pour forth their lily-like voice; even in such wise sat the leaders of the Trojans upon the wall. Now when they saw Helen coming upon the wall 3.153. /Because of old age had they now ceased from battle, but speakers they were full good, like unto cicalas that in a forest sit upon a tree and pour forth their lily-like voice; even in such wise sat the leaders of the Trojans upon the wall. Now when they saw Helen coming upon the wall 3.154. /Because of old age had they now ceased from battle, but speakers they were full good, like unto cicalas that in a forest sit upon a tree and pour forth their lily-like voice; even in such wise sat the leaders of the Trojans upon the wall. Now when they saw Helen coming upon the wall 3.155. /softly they spake winged words one to another:Small blame that Trojans and well-greaved Achaeans should for such a woman long time suffer woes; wondrously like is she to the immortal goddesses to look upon. But even so, for all that she is such an one, let her depart upon the ships
2. Propertius, Elegies, 2.14.23-2.14.24 (1st cent. BCE

3. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 12.120, 12.125-12.127 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.125. 2. We also know that Marcus Agrippa was of the like disposition towards the Jews: for when the people of Ionia were very angry at them, and besought Agrippa that they, and they only, might have those privileges of citizens which Antiochus, the grandson of Seleucus, (who by the Greeks was called The God,) had bestowed on them, and desired that, if the Jews were to be joint-partakers with them 12.126. they might be obliged to worship the gods they themselves worshipped: but when these matters were brought to the trial, the Jews prevailed, and obtained leave to make use of their own customs, and this under the patronage of Nicolaus of Damascus; for Agrippa gave sentence that he could not innovate. 12.127. And if any one hath a mind to know this matter accurately, let him peruse the hundred and twenty-third and hundred and twenty-fourth books of the history of this Nicolaus. Now as to this determination of Agrippa, it is not so much to be admired, for at that time our nation had not made war against the Romans.
4. Josephus Flavius, Jewish War, 1.1-1.9, 1.387, 7.73, 7.121-7.157 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. 1. Whereas the war which the Jews made with the Romans hath been the greatest of all those, not only that have been in our times, but, in a manner, of those that ever were heard of; both of those wherein cities have fought against cities, or nations against nations; while some men who were not concerned in the affairs themselves have gotten together vain and contradictory stories by hearsay, and have written them down after a sophistical manner; 1.1. For that it was a seditious temper of our own that destroyed it; and that they were the tyrants among the Jews who brought the Roman power upon us, who unwillingly attacked us, and occasioned the burning of our holy temple; Titus Caesar, who destroyed it, is himself a witness, who, during the entire war, pitied the people who were kept under by the seditious, and did often voluntarily delay the taking of the city, and allowed time to the siege, in order to let the authors have opportunity for repentance. 1.1. But still he was not able to exclude Antiochus, for he burnt the towers, and filled up the trenches, and marched on with his army. And as he looked upon taking his revenge on Alexander, for endeavoring to stop him, as a thing of less consequence, he marched directly against the Arabians 1.2. and while those that were there present have given false accounts of things, and this either out of a humor of flattery to the Romans, or of hatred towards the Jews; and while their writings contain sometimes accusations, and sometimes encomiums, but nowhere the accurate truth of the facts 1.2. as also how our people made a sedition upon Herod’s death, while Augustus was the Roman emperor, and Quintilius Varus was in that country; and how the war broke out in the twelfth year of Nero, with what happened to Cestius; and what places the Jews assaulted in a hostile manner in the first sallies of the war. 1.2. These honorary grants Caesar sent orders to have engraved in the Capitol, that they might stand there as indications of his own justice, and of the virtue of Antipater. 1.3. I have proposed to myself, for the sake of such as live under the government of the Romans, to translate those books into the Greek tongue, which I formerly composed in the language of our country, and sent to the Upper Barbarians; I, Joseph, the son of Matthias, by birth a Hebrew, a priest also, and one who at first fought against the Romans myself, and was forced to be present at what was done afterward [am the author of this work]. 1.3. 12. I have comprehended all these things in seven books, and have left no occasion for complaint or accusation to such as have been acquainted with this war; and I have written it down for the sake of those that love truth, but not for those that please themselves [with fictitious relations]. And I will begin my account of these things with what I call my First Chapter. 1.3. When Antigonus heard of this, he sent some of his party with orders to hinder, and lay ambushes for these collectors of corn. This command was obeyed, and a great multitude of armed men were gathered together about Jericho, and lay upon the mountains, to watch those that brought the provisions. 1.4. 2. Now at the time when this great concussion of affairs happened, the affairs of the Romans were themselves in great disorder. Those Jews also, who were for innovations, then arose when the times were disturbed; they were also in a flourishing condition for strength and riches, insomuch that the affairs of the East were then exceeding tumultuous, while some hoped for gain, and others were afraid of loss in such troubles; 1.4. and when the city had already received its sacred constitution again, Antiochus died; whose son Antiochus succeeded him in the kingdom, and in his hatred to the Jews also. 1.4. but when Zenodorus was dead, Caesar bestowed on him all that land which lay between Trachonitis and Galilee. Yet, what was still of more consequence to Herod, he was beloved by Caesar next after Agrippa, and by Agrippa next after Caesar; whence he arrived at a very great degree of felicity. Yet did the greatness of his soul exceed it, and the main part of his magimity was extended to the promotion of piety. 1.5. for the Jews hoped that all of their nation which were beyond Euphrates would have raised an insurrection together with them. The Gauls also, in the neighborhood of the Romans, were in motion, and the Celtae were not quiet; but all was in disorder after the death of Nero. And the opportunity now offered induced many to aim at the royal power; and the soldiery affected change, out of the hopes of getting money. 1.5. 2. However, Simeon managed the public affairs after a courageous manner, and took Gazara, and Joppa, and Jamnia, which were cities in the neighborhood. He also got the garrison under, and demolished the citadel. He was afterward an auxiliary to Antiochus, against Trypho, whom he besieged in Dora, before he went on his expedition against the Medes; 1.5. for when he was come to him, he cried out, “Where in the world is this wretched son-in-law of mine? Where shall I see the head of him which contrived to murder his father, which I will tear to pieces with my own hands? I will do the same also to my daughter, who hath such a fine husband; for although she be not a partner in the plot, yet, by being the wife of such a creature, she is polluted. 1.6. I thought it therefore an absurd thing to see the truth falsified in affairs of such great consequence, and to take no notice of it; but to suffer those Greeks and Romans that were not in the wars to be ignorant of these things, and to read either flatteries or fictions, while the Parthians, and the Babylonians, and the remotest Arabians, and those of our nation beyond Euphrates, with the Adiabeni, by my means, knew accurately both whence the war begun, what miseries it brought upon us, and after what manner it ended. 1.6. And as the siege was delayed by this means, the year of rest came on, upon which the Jews rest every seventh year as they do on every seventh day. On this year, therefore, Ptolemy was freed from being besieged, and slew the brethren of John, with their mother, and fled to Zeno, who was also called Cotylas, who was the tyrant of Philadelphia. 1.6. Whereupon the king avenged this insolent attempt of the mother upon her son, and blotted Herod, whom he had by her, out of his testament, who had been before named therein as successor to Antipater. 1.7. 3. It is true, these writers have the confidence to call their accounts histories; wherein yet they seem to me to fail of their own purpose, as well as to relate nothing that is sound. For they have a mind to demonstrate the greatness of the Romans, while they still diminish and lessen the actions of the Jews 1.7. 1. For after the death of their father, the elder of them, Aristobulus, changed the government into a kingdom, and was the first that put a diadem upon his head, four hundred seventy and one years and three months after our people came down into this country, when they were set free from the Babylonian slavery. 1.8. as not discerning how it cannot be that those must appear to be great who have only conquered those that were little. Nor are they ashamed to overlook the length of the war, the multitude of the Roman forces who so greatly suffered in it, or the might of the commanders, whose great labors about Jerusalem will be deemed inglorious, if what they achieved be reckoned but a small matter. 1.8. And when the old man had said this, he was dejected in his mind, and so continued. But, in a little time, news came that Antigonus was slain in a subterraneous place, which was itself also called Strato’s Tower, by the same name with that Caesarea which lay by the seaside; and this ambiguity it was which caused the prophet’s disorder. 1.9. 4. However, I will not go to the other extreme, out of opposition to those men who extol the Romans, nor will I determine to raise the actions of my countrymen too high; but I will prosecute the actions of both parties with accuracy. Yet shall I suit my language to the passions I am under, as to the affairs I describe, and must be allowed to indulge some lamentations upon the miseries undergone by my own country. 1.9. 4. However, when he fought with Obodas, king of the Arabians, who had laid an ambush for him near Golan, and a plot against him, he lost his entire army, which was crowded together in a deep valley, and broken to pieces by the multitude of camels. And when he had made his escape to Jerusalem, he provoked the multitude, which hated him before, to make an insurrection against him, and this on account of the greatness of the calamity that he was under. 1.387. However, the king resolved to expose himself to dangers: accordingly he sailed to Rhodes, where Caesar then abode, and came to him without his diadem, and in the habit and appearance of a private person, but in his behavior as a king. So he concealed nothing of the truth, but spoke thus before his face:— 7.73. The multitude did also betake themselves to feasting; which feasts and drink-offerings they celebrated by their tribes, and their families, and their neighborhoods, and still prayed God to grant that Vespasian, his sons, and all their posterity, might continue in the Roman government for a very long time, and that his dominion might be preserved from all opposition. 7.121. nor were many days overpast when they determined to have but one triumph, that should be common to both of them, on account of the glorious exploits they had performed, although the senate had decreed each of them a separate triumph by himself. 7.122. So when notice had been given beforehand of the day appointed for this pompous solemnity to be made, on account of their victories, not one of the immense multitude was left in the city, but everybody went out so far as to gain only a station where they might stand, and left only such a passage as was necessary for those that were to be seen to go along it. 7.123. 4. Now all the soldiery marched out beforehand by companies, and in their several ranks, under their several commanders, in the nighttime, and were about the gates, not of the upper palaces, but those near the temple of Isis; for there it was that the emperors had rested the foregoing night. 7.124. And as soon as ever it was day, Vespasian and Titus came out crowned with laurel, and clothed in those ancient purple habits which were proper to their family, and then went as far as Octavian’s Walks; 7.125. for there it was that the senate, and the principal rulers, and those that had been recorded as of the equestrian order, waited for them. 7.126. Now a tribunal had been erected before the cloisters, and ivory chairs had been set upon it, when they came and sat down upon them. Whereupon the soldiery made an acclamation of joy to them immediately, and all gave them attestations of their valor; while they were themselves without their arms, and only in their silken garments, and crowned with laurel: 7.127. then Vespasian accepted of these shouts of theirs; but while they were still disposed to go on in such acclamations, he gave them a signal of silence. 7.128. And when everybody entirely held their peace, he stood up, and covering the greatest part of his head with his cloak, he put up the accustomed solemn prayers; the like prayers did Titus put up also; 7.129. after which prayers Vespasian made a short speech to all the people, and then sent away the soldiers to a dinner prepared for them by the emperors. 7.131. there it was that they tasted some food, and when they had put on their triumphal garments, and had offered sacrifices to the gods that were placed at the gate, they sent the triumph forward, and marched through the theatres, that they might be the more easily seen by the multitudes. 7.132. 5. Now it is impossible to describe the multitude of the shows as they deserve, and the magnificence of them all; such indeed as a man could not easily think of as performed, either by the labor of workmen, or the variety of riches, or the rarities of nature; 7.133. for almost all such curiosities as the most happy men ever get by piecemeal were here one heaped on another, and those both admirable and costly in their nature; and all brought together on that day demonstrated the vastness of the dominions of the Romans; 7.134. for there was here to be seen a mighty quantity of silver, and gold, and ivory, contrived into all sorts of things, and did not appear as carried along in pompous show only, but, as a man may say, running along like a river. Some parts were composed of the rarest purple hangings, and so carried along; and others accurately represented to the life what was embroidered by the arts of the Babylonians. 7.135. There were also precious stones that were transparent, some set in crowns of gold, and some in other ouches, as the workmen pleased; and of these such a vast number were brought, that we could not but thence learn how vainly we imagined any of them to be rarities. 7.136. The images of the gods were also carried, being as well wonderful for their largeness, as made very artificially, and with great skill of the workmen; nor were any of these images of any other than very costly materials; and many species of animals were brought, every one in their own natural ornaments. 7.137. The men also who brought every one of these shows were great multitudes, and adorned with purple garments, all over interwoven with gold; those that were chosen for carrying these pompous shows having also about them such magnificent ornaments as were both extraordinary and surprising. 7.138. Besides these, one might see that even the great number of the captives was not unadorned, while the variety that was in their garments, and their fine texture, concealed from the sight the deformity of their bodies. 7.139. But what afforded the greatest surprise of all was the structure of the pageants that were borne along; for indeed he that met them could not but be afraid that the bearers would not be able firmly enough to support them, such was their magnitude; 7.141. for upon many of them were laid carpets of gold. There was also wrought gold and ivory fastened about them all; 7.142. and many resemblances of the war, and those in several ways, and variety of contrivances, affording a most lively portraiture of itself. 7.143. For there was to be seen a happy country laid waste, and entire squadrons of enemies slain; while some of them ran away, and some were carried into captivity; with walls of great altitude and magnitude overthrown and ruined by machines; with the strongest fortifications taken, and the walls of most populous cities upon the tops of hills seized on 7.144. and an army pouring itself within the walls; as also every place full of slaughter, and supplications of the enemies, when they were no longer able to lift up their hands in way of opposition. Fire also sent upon temples was here represented, and houses overthrown, and falling upon their owners: 7.145. rivers also, after they came out of a large and melancholy desert, ran down, not into a land cultivated, nor as drink for men, or for cattle, but through a land still on fire upon every side; for the Jews related that such a thing they had undergone during this war. 7.146. Now the workmanship of these representations was so magnificent and lively in the construction of the things, that it exhibited what had been done to such as did not see it, as if they had been there really present. 7.147. On the top of every one of these pageants was placed the commander of the city that was taken, and the manner wherein he was taken. Moreover, there followed those pageants a great number of ships; 7.148. and for the other spoils, they were carried in great plenty. But for those that were taken in the temple of Jerusalem, they made the greatest figure of them all; that is, the golden table, of the weight of many talents; the candlestick also, that was made of gold, though its construction were now changed from that which we made use of; 7.149. for its middle shaft was fixed upon a basis, and the small branches were produced out of it to a great length, having the likeness of a trident in their position, and had every one a socket made of brass for a lamp at the tops of them. These lamps were in number seven, and represented the dignity of the number seven among the Jews; 7.151. After these spoils passed by a great many men, carrying the images of Victory, whose structure was entirely either of ivory or of gold. 7.152. After which Vespasian marched in the first place, and Titus followed him; Domitian also rode along with them, and made a glorious appearance, and rode on a horse that was worthy of admiration. 7.153. 6. Now the last part of this pompous show was at the temple of Jupiter Capitolinus, whither when they were come, they stood still; for it was the Romans’ ancient custom to stay till somebody brought the news that the general of the enemy was slain. 7.154. This general was Simon, the son of Gioras, who had then been led in this triumph among the captives; a rope had also been put upon his head, and he had been drawn into a proper place in the forum, and had withal been tormented by those that drew him along; and the law of the Romans required that malefactors condemned to die should be slain there. 7.155. Accordingly, when it was related that there was an end of him, and all the people had sent up a shout for joy, they then began to offer those sacrifices which they had consecrated, in the prayers used in such solemnities; which when they had finished, they went away to the palace. 7.156. And as for some of the spectators, the emperors entertained them at their own feast; and for all the rest there were noble preparations made for their feasting at home; 7.157. for this was a festival day to the city of Rome, as celebrated for the victory obtained by their army over their enemies, for the end that was now put to their civil miseries, and for the commencement of their hopes of future prosperity and happiness.
5. Lucan, Pharsalia, 8.553, 9.599-9.600 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Martial, Epigrams, 2.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Martial, Epigrams, 2.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 34.26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Plutarch, Lucullus, 37.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Plutarch, Pompey, 45 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Seneca The Younger, Troades, 1069-1087, 1068 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Silius Italicus, Punica, 3.607 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Suetonius, Augustus, 54-56, 53 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14. Suetonius, Domitianus, 6.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15. Suetonius, Iulius, 37.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Suetonius, Nero, 57 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Suetonius, Tiberius, 27, 26 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Suetonius, Vespasianus, 7.2, 25.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

19. Tacitus, Agricola, 39 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Tacitus, Germania (De Origine Et Situ Germanorum), 37 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Tacitus, Histories, 1.2, 2.8, 2.76, 2.101, 4.8, 4.52, 4.81 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.8.  About this time Achaia and Asia were terrified by a false rumour of Nero's arrival. The reports with regard to his death had been varied, and therefore many people imagined and believed that he was alive. The forces and attempts of other pretenders we shall tell as we proceed; but at this time, a slave from Pontus or, as others have reported, a freedman from Italy, who was skilled in playing on the cithara and in singing, gained the readier belief in his deceit through these accomplishments and his resemblance to Nero. He recruited some deserters, poor tramps whom he had bribed by great promises, and put to sea. A violent storm drove him to the island of Cythnus, where he called to his standard some soldiers who were returning from the East on leave, or ordered them to be killed if they refused. Then he robbed the merchants, and armed all the ablest-bodied of their slaves. A centurion, Sisenna, who was carrying clasped right hands, the symbol of friendship, to the praetorians in the name of the army in Syria, the pretender approached with various artifices, until Sisenna in alarm and fearing violence secretly left the island and made his escape. Then the alarm spread far and wide. Many came eagerly forward at the famous name, prompted by their desire for a change and their hatred of the present situation. The fame of the pretender was increasing from day to day when a chance shattered it. 2.76.  While he was hesitating, moved by such fears as these, his mind was confirmed by his officers and friends and especially by Mucianus, who first had long private conversations with him and then spoke openly before the rest: "All who are debating high emprises ought to consider whether their purpose is useful to the state, glorious for themselves, easy of accomplishment, or at least not difficult. At the same time they must take into account the character of their adviser. Is he ready to share the risks involved as well as to give advice? If Fortune favours the undertaking, who is the man for whom the highest honour is sought? I call you, Vespasian, to the throne. How advantageous to the state, how glorious for you this may prove, are questions which depend, after the gods, on your own acts. Have no fear that I may appear to flatter you. It is rather a disgrace than a glory to be chosen emperor after Vitellius. It is not against the keen mind of the deified Augustus, nor the cautious nature of the aged Tiberius, nor against the long-established imperial house of even a Gaius or a Claudius, or, if you like, of a Nero, that we are rising. You respected the ancestry even of Galba. But to remain longer inactive and to leave the state to corruption and ruin would appear nothing but sloth and cowardice on your part, even if subservience should prove as safe for you as it certainly would be disgraceful. The time is already past and gone when you could seem to have no desires for supreme power. Your only refuge is the throne. Have you forgotten the murder of Corbulo? He was of more splendid family than I am, I grant you, but Nero also was superior to Vitellius in point of noble birth. Anyone who is feared is noble enough in the eyes of the man who fears him. Moreover you have proof in the case of Vitellius himself that an army can make an emperor, for Vitellius owes his elevation to no campaigns or reputation as a soldier, but solely to men's hatred of Galba. Even Otho, who owed his defeat, not to his rival's skill as general or to the force of the opposing army, but to his own hasty despair, Vitellius has already made seem a great emperor whom men regret; and in the meantime he is scattering his legions, disarming his cohorts, and every day sowing new seeds of war. All the enthusiasm and courage that his soldiers ever had is being dissipated in taverns, in debauches, and in imitation of their emperor. You have in Syria, Judea, and Egypt nine legions at their full strength, not worn out by fighting, not infected by mutiny, but troops who have gained strength by experience and proved themselves victorious over a foreign foe. You have strong fleets, cavalry, and cohorts, princes wholly loyal to you, and an experience greater than all others. 4.8.  Marcellus replied that it was not his proposal, but that of the consul designate that was attacked; and it was a proposal that conformed to the ancient precedents, which prescribed that delegates should be chosen by lot, that there might be no room for self-seeking or for hate. Nothing had occurred to give reason for abandoning long-established customs or for turning the honour due an emperor into an insult to any man: they could all pay homage. What they must try to avoid was allowing the wilfulness of certain individuals to irritate the mind of the emperor, who was as yet unbiassed, being newly come to power and watchful of every look and every word. For his own part he remembered the time in which he was born, the form of government that their fathers and grandfathers had established; he admired the earlier period, but adapted himself to the present; he prayed for good emperors, but endured any sort. It was not by his speech any more than by the judgment of the senate that Thrasea had been brought to ruin; Nero's cruel nature found its delight in such shows of justice, and such a friendship caused him no less anxiety than exile in others. In short, let them set Helvidius on an equality with Cato and Brutus in firmness and courage: for himself, he was only one of a senate which accepted a common servitude. He would also advise Priscus not to exalt himself above an emperor, not to try to check by his precepts a man of ripe age as Vespasian was, a man who had gained the insignia of a triumph, and who had sons grown to man's estate. Just as the worst emperors wish for absolute tyrannical power, even the best desire some limit to the freedom of their subjects. These arguments, which were hurled back and forth with great vehemence, were received with different feelings. The party prevailed that favoured the selection of the envoys by lot, for even the ordinary senators were eager to preserve precedent, and all the most prominent also inclined to the same course, fearing to excite envy if they should be selected themselves. 4.52.  It is said that Titus, before leaving, in a long interview with his father begged him not to be easily excited by the reports of those who calumniated Domitian, and urged him to show himself impartial and forgiving toward his son. "Neither armies nor fleets," he argued, "are so strong a defence of the imperial power as a number of children; for friends are chilled, changed, and lost by time, fortune, and sometimes by inordinate desires or by mistakes: the ties of blood cannot be severed by any man, least of all by princes, whose success others also enjoy, but whose misfortunes touch only their nearest kin. Not even brothers will always agree unless the father sets the example." Not so much reconciled toward Domitian as delighted with Titus's show of brotherly affection, Vespasian bade him be of good cheer and to magnify the state by war and arms; he would himself care for peace and his house. Then he had some of the swiftest ships laden with grain and entrusted to the sea, although it was still dangerous: for, in fact, Rome was in such a critical condition that she did not have more than ten days' supplies in her granaries when the supplies from Vespasian came to her relief. 4.81.  During the months while Vespasian was waiting at Alexandria for the regular season of the summer winds and a settled sea, many marvels continued to mark the favour of heaven and a certain partiality of the gods toward him. One of the common people of Alexandria, well known for his loss of sight, threw himself before Vespasian's knees, praying him with groans to cure his blindness, being so directed by the god Serapis, whom this most superstitious of nations worships before all others; and he besought the emperor to deign to moisten his cheeks and eyes with his spittle. Another, whose hand was useless, prompted by the same god, begged Caesar to step and trample on it. Vespasian at first ridiculed these appeals and treated them with scorn; then, when the men persisted, he began at one moment to fear the discredit of failure, at another to be inspired with hopes of success by the appeals of the suppliants and the flattery of his courtiers: finally, he directed the physicians to give their opinion as to whether such blindness and infirmity could be overcome by human aid. Their reply treated the two cases differently: they said that in the first the power of sight had not been completely eaten away and it would return if the obstacles were removed; in the other, the joints had slipped and become displaced, but they could be restored if a healing pressure were applied to them. Such perhaps was the wish of the gods, and it might be that the emperor had been chosen for this divine service; in any case, if a cure were obtained, the glory would be Caesar's, but in the event of failure, ridicule would fall only on the poor suppliants. So Vespasian, believing that his good fortune was capable of anything and that nothing was any longer incredible, with a smiling countece, and amid intense excitement on the part of the bystanders, did as he was asked to do. The hand was instantly restored to use, and the day again shone for the blind man. Both facts are told by eye-witnesses even now when falsehood brings no reward.
22. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 43.19, 71.35.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

43.19. 1.  After this he conducted the whole festival in a brilliant manner, as was fitting in honour of victories so many and so decisive. He celebrated triumphs for the Gauls, for Egypt, for Pharnaces, and for Juba, in four sections, on four separate days.,2.  Most of it, of course, delighted the spectators, but the sight of Arsinoë of Egypt, whom he led among the captives, and the host of lictors and the symbols of triumph taken from the citizens who had fallen in Africa displeased them exceedingly.,3.  The lictors, on account of their numbers, appeared to them a most offensive multitude, since never before had they beheld so many at one time; and the sight of Arsinoë, a woman and one considered a queen, in chains, — a spectacle which had never yet been seen, at least in Rome, — aroused very great pity,,4.  and with this as an excuse they lamented their private misfortunes. She, to be sure, was released out of consideration for her brothers; but others, including Vercingetorix, were put to death.
23. Marcus Aurelius Emperor of Rome, Meditations, 1.7, 4.3-4.4, 9.29, 9.36-9.37 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

24. Pliny The Younger, Panegyric, 65.1-65.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
aemilius paullus, m., triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
alcibiades, statue in comitium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
alexandria Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 64; Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 191
ambracia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
antioch Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 64
apollo, pythian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
art, sculpture Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
asia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
asphaltitis Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 64
astyanax Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
capitol, processions Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
cato the younger Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
chatti Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
citizenship Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
clothing Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
dacians Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
domitian, (false) triumph of Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
domitian Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
domitian\n, in josephus Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 64
domitilla, wife of domitian Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 64
economics, poverty Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
egypt Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 191
equality Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
fear Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
flavian, triumph Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
friendship, friend Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
fulvius nobilior, m., his triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
gandhi Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
gaul Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
grace Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
grant, ulysses s. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
greek Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
hercules Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 191
hope diamond Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
humility Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
identity, american Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
josephus fides in Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 64
juba, king Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
judaea Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
julius caesar, c., his triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
julius caesar, triumphs of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
jupiter Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
king, emperor, augustus Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
king, emperor, marcus aurelius Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
king, emperor, tiberius Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
king, emperor, trajan Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
king, emperor, vespasian Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
king jr., martin luther Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
law, roman Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
lewis and clark expedition Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
lincoln, abraham, his death mask Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
lunar module Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
manet Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
metals, silver Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
mos maiorum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
museum, the holocaust museum Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
museum, the national portrait gallery Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
nero, false neros Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
nero Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 191; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
normandy Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
numa popilius, and pythagoras Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
pharnaces, king of pontus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
philosophy Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
polyxena Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
pompey (the great), triumphs and honours Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
pompey the great, his triumph over mithridates Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
praecepta ad filium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
praise Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
pydna Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
pythagoras, statue in the comitium Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
reate Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 191
rhetoric, dialogue Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
rhetoric, satire Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
ritual, false Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
ritual Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
rome, campus martius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, circus flaminius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, curia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, empire Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
rome, forum of augustus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, pantheon Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, temple of apollo sosianus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, temple of castor and pollux Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, temple of ceres Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, temple of diana on the aventine Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, temple of divus augustus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, temple of divus julius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, temple of fides Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, temple of jupiter capitolinus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
rome, temple of venus genetrix Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
scipio (africanus) Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
slavery (servant) Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
spectacle in public life Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
suetonius tranquillus, c. Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 191
titus Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
titus and fides, in josephus Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 64
triumph, as temporary displays Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
triumph, domitians triumph Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
triumph, of scipio Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
triumph, triumphal procession/parade Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
triumph Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131; Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
triumphs Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
triumphs spurned' Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
troy Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
valerius publicola, p., his antiquitates Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
valerius publicola, p., his disciplina Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
velabrum Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
vermeer, johannes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
vespasian, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 6
vespasian, his triumph Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 221
vespasian, in josephus Augoustakis et al., Fides in Flavian Literature (2021) 64
vespasian Price, Finkelberg and Shahar, Rome: An Empire of Many Nations: New Perspectives on Ethnic Diversity and Cultural Identity (2021) 191; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 131
virtue Rothschold, Blanton and Calhoun, The History of Religions School Today: Essays on the New Testament and Related Ancient Mediterranean Texts (2014) 271
washington, george Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
washington dc, blair house Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
washington dc, capitol dome Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
washington dc, fords theatre Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
washington dc, lincoln memorial Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
washington dc Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
washington monument Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
washington national cathedral, vietnam war memorial Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
washington national cathedral Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2
watergate hotel Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 2