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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10522
Suetonius, Tiberius, 59.2


nan Look, son of Rome, upon Sulla, for himself not for you blest and happy, Marius too, if you will, but after capturing Rome; Hands of an Antony see, rousing the strife of the people, Hands stained with blood not once, dripping again and again; Then say: Rome is no more! He ever has reigned with great bloodshed, Whoso made himself king, coming from banishment home." These at first he wished to be taken as the work of those who were impatient of his reforms, voicing not so much their real feelings as their anger and vexation; and he used to say from time to time: "Let them hate me, provided they respect my conduct." Later he himself proved them only too true and unerring.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

6 results
1. Lucan, Pharsalia, 7.778 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 1.12.4, 1.13.5, 2.2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Seneca The Younger, Thyestes, 208-211, 207 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Suetonius, Caligula, 30.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Tacitus, Annals, 14.10.1-14.10.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.10.1.  But only with the completion of the crime was its magnitude realized by the Caesar. For the rest of the night, sometimes dumb and motionless, but not rarely starting in terror to his feet with a sort of delirium, he waited for the daylight which he believed would bring his end. Indeed, his first encouragement to hope came from the adulation of the centurions and tribunes, as, at the suggestion of Burrus, they grasped his hand and wished him joy of escaping his unexpected danger and the criminal enterprise of his mother. His friends in turn visited the temples; and, once the example had been given, the Campanian towns in the neighbourhood attested their joy by victims and deputations. By a contrast in hypocrisy, he himself was mournful, repining apparently at his own preservation and full of tears for the death of a parent. But because the features of a landscape change less obligingly than the looks of men, and because there was always obtruded upon his gaze the grim prospect of that sea and those shores, — and there were some who believed that he could hear a trumpet, calling in the hills that rose around, and lamentations at his mother's grave, — he withdrew to Naples and forwarded to the senate a letter, the sum of which was that an assassin with his weapon upon him had been discovered in Agermus, one of the confidential freedmen of Agrippina, and that his mistress, conscious of her guilt, had paid the penalty of meditated murder.
6. Pseudo-Seneca, Octauia, 457



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actor, acting Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
agrippina the younger, empress Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
allusion Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
annals Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
atreus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
c. iulius caesar Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
c. suetonius tranquillus Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
caligula, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
caligula Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
dialogue Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
dio cassius Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
drama Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
intertexts Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
loyalty Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
lucan Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
m. tullius cicero Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
madness Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
matricide Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
nero, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
nero Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
octavia Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
oratio recta, oratio obliqua Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
pharsalus, battle of, lucan Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
philosophy Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
politics Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
power' Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
seneca the younger Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
speech-acts Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
stoic Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
tacitus, p. cornelius Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
thyestes Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
tiberius, emperor Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206
tiberius (emperor) Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 258
tribunate, tribunes Poulsen, Usages of the Past in Roman Historiography (2021), 206