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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10522
Suetonius, Tiberius, 20


nan After two years he returned to the city from Germany and celebrated the triumph which he had postponed, accompanied also by his generals, for whom he had obtained the triumphal regalia. And before turning to enter the Capitol, he dismounted from his chariot and fell at the knees of his father, who was presiding over the ceremonies. He sent Bato, the leader of the Pannonians, to Ravenna, after presenting him with rich gifts; thus showing his gratitude to him for allowing him to escape when he was trapped with his army in a dangerous place. Then he gave a banquet to the people at a thousand tables, and a largess of three hundred sesterces to every man. With the proceeds of his spoils he restored and dedicated the temple of Concord, as well as that of Pollux and Castor, in his own name and that of his brother.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.2.167 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 20-21, 19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Horace, Letters, 1.6.17 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Livy, History, 2.8.7-2.8.8, 2.27.5, 4.29.7, 9.46.6-9.46.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Ovid, Fasti, 1.640-1.648, 6.637-6.638 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

1.640. Camillus, conqueror of the Etruscan people 1.641. Vowed your ancient temple and kept his vow. 1.642. His reason was that the commoners had armed themselves 1.643. Seceding from the nobles, and Rome feared their power. 1.644. This latest reason was a better one: revered Leader, Germany 1.645. offered up her dishevelled tresses, at your command: 1.646. From that, you dedicated the spoils of a defeated race 1.647. And built a shrine to the goddess that you yourself worship. 1.648. A goddess your mother honoured by her life, and by an altar 6.637. His father showed his paternity by touching the child’ 6.638. Head with fire, and a cap of flames glowed on his hair.
6. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 6.5.1-6.5.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 29 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 29 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

9. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 2.93-2.94, 35.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Plutarch, Moralia, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Suetonius, Augustus, 29.4, 31.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12. Suetonius, Tiberius, 42.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

13. Tacitus, Annals, 1.4, 2.43, 2.49, 3.72 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.4.  It was thus an altered world, and of the old, unspoilt Roman character not a trace lingered. Equality was an outworn creed, and all eyes looked to the mandate of the sovereign — with no immediate misgivings, so long as Augustus in the full vigour of his prime upheld himself, his house, and peace. But when the wearing effects of bodily sickness added themselves to advancing years, and the end was coming and new hopes dawning, a few voices began idly to discuss the blessings of freedom; more were apprehensive of war; others desired it; the great majority merely exchanged gossip derogatory to their future masters:— "Agrippa, fierce-tempered, and hot from his humiliation, was unfitted by age and experience for so heavy a burden. Tiberius Nero was mature in years and tried in war, but had the old, inbred arrogance of the Claudian family, and hints of cruelty, strive as he would to repress them, kept breaking out. He had been reared from the cradle in a regt house; consulates and triumphs had been heaped on his youthful head: even during the years when he lived at Rhodes in ostensible retirement and actual exile, he had studied nothing save anger, hypocrisy, and secret lasciviousness. Add to the tale his mother with her feminine caprice: they must be slaves, it appeared, to the distaff, and to a pair of striplings as well, who in the interval would oppress the state and in the upshot rend it asunder! 2.43.  These circumstances, then, and the events in Armenia, which I mentioned above, were discussed by Tiberius before the senate. "The commotion in the East," he added, "could only be settled by the wisdom of Germanicus: for his own years were trending to their autumn, and those of Drusus were as yet scarcely mature." There followed a decree of the Fathers, delegating to Germanicus the provinces beyond the sea, with powers overriding, in all regions he might visit, those of the local governors holding office by allotment or imperial nomination. Tiberius, however, had removed Creticus Silanus from Syria — he was a marriage connection of Germanicus, whose eldest son, Nero, was plighted to his daughter — and had given the appointment to Gnaeus Piso, a man of ungoverned passions and constitutional insubordinacy. For there was a strain of wild arrogance in the blood — a strain derived from his father Piso; who in the Civil War lent strenuous aid against Caesar to the republican party during its resurrection in Africa, then followed the fortunes of Brutus and Cassius, and, on the annulment of his exile, refused to become a suitor for office, until approached with a special request to accept a consulate proffered by Augustus. But, apart from the paternal temper, Piso's brain was fired by the lineage and wealth of his wife Plancina: to Tiberius he accorded a grudging precedence; upon his children he looked down as far beneath him. Nor did he entertain a doubt that he had been selected for the governorship of Syria in order to repress the ambitions of Germanicus. The belief has been held that he did in fact receive private instructions from Tiberius; and Plancina, beyond question, had advice from the ex-empress, bent with feminine jealousy upon persecuting Agrippina. For the court was split and torn by unspoken preferences for Germanicus or for Drusus. Tiberius leaned to the latter as his own issue and blood of his blood. Germanicus, owing to the estrangement of his uncle, had risen in the esteem of the world; and he had a further advantage in the distinction of his mother's family, among whom he could point to Mark Antony for a grandfather and to Augustus for a great-uncle. On the other hand, the plain Roman knight, Pomponius Atticus, who was great-grandfather to Drusus, seemed to reflect no credit upon the ancestral effigies of the Claudian house; while both in fecundity and in fair fame Agrippina, the consort of Germanicus, ranked higher than Drusus' helpmeet, Livia. The brothers, however, maintained a singular uimity, unshaken by the contentions of their kith and kin. 2.49.  Nearly at the same time, he consecrated the temples, ruined by age or fire, the restoration of which had been undertaken by Augustus. They included a temple to Liber, Libera, and Ceres, close to the Circus Maximus, and vowed by Aulus Postumius, the dictator; another, on the same site, to Flora, founded by Lucius and Marcus Publicius in their aedileship, and a shrine of Janus, built in the Herb Market by Gaius Duilius, who first carried the Roman cause to success on sea and earned a naval triumph over the Carthaginians. The temple of Hope, vowed by Aulus Atilius in the same war, was dedicated by Germanicus. 3.72.  Nearly at the same time, Marcus Lepidus asked permission from the senate to strengthen and decorate the Basilica of Paulus, a monument of the Aemilian house, at his own expense. Public munificence was a custom still; nor had Augustus debarred a Taurus, a Philippus, or a Balbus from devoting the trophies of his arms or the overflow of his wealth to the greater splendour of the capital and the glory of posterity: and now Lepidus, a man of but moderate fortune, followed in their steps by renovating the famous edifice of his fathers. On the other hand, the rebuilding of the Theatre of Pompey, destroyed by a casual fire, was undertaken by Caesar, on the ground that no member of the family was equal to the task of restoration: the name of Pompey was, however, to remain. At the same time, he gave high praise to Sejanus, "through whose energy and watchfulness so grave an outbreak had stopped at one catastrophe." The Fathers voted a statue to Sejanus, to be placed in the Theatre of Pompey. Again, a short time afterwards, when he was honouring Junius Blaesus, proconsul of Africa, with the triumphal insignia, he explained that he did so as a compliment to Sejanus, of whom Blaesus was uncle. — None the less the exploits of Blaesus deserved such a distinction.
14. Tacitus, Histories, 3.72 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.72.  This was the saddest and most shameful crime that the Roman state had ever suffered since its foundation. Rome had no foreign foe; the gods were ready to be propitious if our characters had allowed; and yet the home of Jupiter Optimus Maximus, founded after due auspices by our ancestors as a pledge of empire, which neither Porsenna, when the city gave itself up to him, nor the Gauls when they captured it, could violate — this was the shrine that the mad fury of emperors destroyed! The Capitol had indeed been burned before in civil war, but the crime was that of private individuals. Now it was openly besieged, openly burned — and what were the causes that led to arms? What was the price paid for this great disaster? This temple stood intact so long as we fought for our country. King Tarquinius Priscus had vowed it in the war with the Sabines and had laid its foundations rather to match his hope of future greatness than in accordance with what the fortunes of the Roman people, still moderate, could supply. Later the building was begun by Servius Tullius with the enthusiastic help of Rome's allies, and afterwards carried on by Tarquinius Superbus with the spoils taken from the enemy at the capture of Suessa Pometia. But the glory of completing the work was reserved for liberty: after the expulsion of the kings, Horatius Pulvillus in his second consulship dedicated it; and its magnificence was such that the enormous wealth of the Roman people acquired thereafter adorned rather than increased its splendour. The temple was built again on the same spot when after an interval of four hundred and fifteen years it had been burned in the consulship of Lucius Scipio and Gaius Norbanus. The victorious Sulla undertook the work, but still he did not dedicate it; that was the only thing that his good fortune was refused. Amid all the great works built by the Caesars the name of Lutatius Catulus kept its place down to Vitellius's day. This was the temple that then was burned.
15. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 55.8.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

55.8.2.  After assigning to himself the duty of repairing the temple of Concord, in order that he might inscribe upon it his own name and that of Drusus, he celebrated his triumph, and in company with his mother dedicated the precinct called the precinct of Livia. He gave a banquet to the senate on the Capitol, and she gave one on her own account to the women somewhere or other.
16. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 7.29, 8.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.29. To Montanus. You will first laugh, then feel annoyed, and then laugh again, if ever you read something which you will think almost incredible, unless you see it with your own eyes. I noticed the other day, just before you come to the first milestone on the Tiburtine Road, a monument to Pallas * bearing this inscription 8.6. To Montanus. You must by this time be aware from my last letter that I just lately noticed the monument erected to Pallas, which bore the following inscription Well, then, am I to consider that those who decreed these extravagant praises were merely gratifying his vanity or were acting like abject slaves ? I should say the former if such a spirit were becoming to a senate, and the latter but that no one is such an abject slave as to stoop to such servilities. Are we to ascribe it then to a desire to curry favour with Pallas, or to an insane passion to get on in the world? But who is so utterly mad as to wish to get on in the world at the price of his own shame and the disgrace of his country, especially when l
17. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 7.29, 8.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.29. To Montanus. You will first laugh, then feel annoyed, and then laugh again, if ever you read something which you will think almost incredible, unless you see it with your own eyes. I noticed the other day, just before you come to the first milestone on the Tiburtine Road, a monument to Pallas * bearing this inscription 8.6. To Montanus. You must by this time be aware from my last letter that I just lately noticed the monument erected to Pallas, which bore the following inscription Well, then, am I to consider that those who decreed these extravagant praises were merely gratifying his vanity or were acting like abject slaves ? I should say the former if such a spirit were becoming to a senate, and the latter but that no one is such an abject slave as to stoop to such servilities. Are we to ascribe it then to a desire to curry favour with Pallas, or to an insane passion to get on in the world? But who is so utterly mad as to wish to get on in the world at the price of his own shame and the disgrace of his country, especially when l
18. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 16.10.13-16.10.15 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

16.10.13. So then he entered Rome, the home of empire and of every virtue, and when he had come to the Rostra, the most renowned forum of ancient dominion, he stood amazed; and on every side on which his eyes rested he was dazzled by the array of marvellous sights. He addressed the nobles in the senate-house and the populace from the tribunal, and being welcomed to the palace with manifold attentions, he enjoyed a longed-for pleasure; and on several occasions, when holding equestrian games, he took delight in the sallies of the commons, who were neither presumptuous nor regardless of their old-time freedom, while he himself also respectfully observed the due mean. 16.10.14. For he did not (as in the case of other cities) permit the contests to be terminated at his own discretion, but left them (as the custom is) to various chances. Then, as he surveyed the sections of the city and its suburbs, lying within the summits of the seven hills, along their slopes, or on level ground, he thought that whatever first met his gaze towered above all the rest: the sanctuaries of Tarpeian Jove so far surpassing as things divine excel those of earth; the baths built up to the measure of provinces; the huge bulk of the amphitheatre, strengthened by its framework of Tiburtine stone, Travertine. to whose top human eyesight barely ascends; the Pantheon like a rounded city-district, Regio here refers to one of the regions, or districts, into which the city was divided. vaulted over in lofty beauty; and the exalted heights which rise with platforms to which one may mount, and bear the likenesses of former emperors; The columns of Trajan, Antoninus Pius, and Marcus Aurelius. The platform at the top was reached by a stairway within the column. the Temple of the City, The double temple of Venus and Roma, built by Hadriian and dedicated in A.D. 135 the Forum of Peace, The Forum Pacis, or Vespasiani, was begun by Vespasian in A.D. 71, after the taking of Jerusalem, and dedicated in 75. It lay behind the basilica Aemilia. the Theatre of Pompey, Built in 55 B.C. in the Campus Martius. the Oleum, A building for musical performances, erected by Domitian, probably near his Stadium. the Stadium, The Stadium of Domitian in the Campus Martius, the shape and size of which is almost exactly preserved by the modern Piazza Navona. and amongst these the other adornments of the Eternal City. 16.10.15. But when he came to the Forum of Trajan, a construction unique under the heavens, as we believe, and admirable even in the uimous opinion of the gods, he stood fast in amazement, turning his attention to the gigantic complex about him, beggaring description and never again to be imitated by mortal men. Therefore abandoning all hope of attempting anything like it, he said that he would and could copy Trajan’s steed alone, which stands in the centre of the vestibule, carrying the emperor himself.
19. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 8.681 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agrippa Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
agrippina the younger Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
antioch Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
apollo, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
ardaeans Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
augustus, and apollo Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
augustus, building works Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
augustus, mausoleum of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
authentic versus copy, and pleasure Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
authentic versus copy, ignorance of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
baton, brothers so named Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
catulus, quintus lutatius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
cerauni Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
ceres, and temple of concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
charisma, transmission of Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 288
christodorus of thebes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
claudius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
concord, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
constantinople, the zeuxippus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
constantius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
dalmatia (delmatia) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
daorizians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
daversi Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
desitiates Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
dindari Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
ditiones Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
dius fidius, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
drusus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
encolpius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
epetium Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
flavius, gnaeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
fulvius flaccus, ser. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
galinsky, k. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
germanicus caesar Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
getae Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
gladiators, depicted in paintings Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
glinditiones Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
greece, culture appropriated by romans Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
his villa, dedications to zeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
homer, the iliad Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
homer, the odyssey Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
horatius, marcus pulvillus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
illyricum (illyria) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
impietas against, viewer response to Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
inscriptions, in political process Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
inscriptions Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
issa Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
iulius, gnaeus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
julius caesar, monumental architecture Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, beginnings Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
jupiter best and greatest, temple of, restorations Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
kellum, b. Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
liber, plebeian associations of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
macedonia, macedonians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
maezei Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
marsyas, plebeian associations of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
mausoleum of augustus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
melcumani Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
mercury, temple of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
naresi Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
naro river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
narona Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
nicias, augustus favours Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
nicias, his liber pater Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
objects, and inscriptions Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
objects, and power Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
objects, viewer understanding of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
octavia, portico of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
pallas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
pantheon Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
periplous, periploi Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
petronius, on trimalchios house Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
piracy Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
pliny the elder, on ignorance of art Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
pliny the younger, against pallas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
pompey, theatre of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
portico of octavia Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
postumius, spurius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
praecepta ad filium, on statuary and imagines Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
quinctius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
rome, forum romanum, pictures displayed in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
rome, temple of castor and pollux, tiberius restoration of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116, 267, 270
rome, temple of ceres, associated with the plebs Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
rome, temple of concordia, its restoration Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
rome, temple of concordia, and augustus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
rome, temple of concordia, and thrasyllus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
rome, temple of concordia, and tiberius Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267, 270
rome, temple of concordia, cosmic significance of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
rome, temple of concordia, its collection Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
rome, temple of concordia, rededicated concordia augusta Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
rome, temple of concordia Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267, 270
rome, temple of concordia in Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
salona Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
sardeates Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
scardona Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
scirtari Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
senate, and people of rome Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
senate, bestows honours Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
separi Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
sicily Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
simulacra gentium Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 288
solentia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
statuary, equestrian Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
tariotae Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
tarquin Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, apollo Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, concord Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of, dius fidius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temple of mercury Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
temples, as display expenditure Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
theatre of pompey Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
tiberius, campaigns in germany and illyria Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
tiberius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
tiberius, heavy drinker Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
tiberius, his building programme meagre Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
tiberius, his self-imposed exile on rhodes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
tiberius, lacks civilitas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
tiberius, republican sentiments of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
trajan, his column Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
trimalchio, his house Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
triumphs under augustus' Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 288
trojans, as romes ancestors Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
umbilicus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270
valerius Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
vardaeans Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
varro, m. terentius Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 179
verginius rufus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
verres, c., cicero prosecutes Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
verres, c., forces sicilians to erect dedications Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
vesta, parian statue of Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 267
victory, theology of Ando, Imperial Ideology and Provincial Loyalty in the Roman Empire (2013) 288
viewers, and literacy Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
viewers, elite versus non-elite Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 104
vitellius, emperor Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 48
zeus Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 116
zeuxis, his marsyas Rutledge, Ancient Rome as a Museum: Power, Identity, and the Culture of Collecting (2012) 270