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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10518
Suetonius, Nero, 49


nanAt last, while his companions one and all urged him to save himself as soon as possible from the indignities that threatened him, he bade them dig a grave in his presence, proportioned to the size of his own person, and at the same time bring water and wood for presently disposing of his body. As each of these things was done, he wept and said again and again: "What an artist the world is losing!",While he hesitated, a letter was brought to Phaon by one of his couriers. Nero snatching it from his hand read that he had been pronounced a public enemy by the senate, and that they were seeking him to punish in the ancient fashion; and he asked what manner of punishment that was. When he learned that the criminal was stripped, fastened by the neck in a fork and then beaten to death with rods, in mortal terror he seized two daggers which he had brought with him, and then, after trying the point of each, put them up again, pleading that the fatal hour had not yet come.,Now he would beg Sporus to begin to lament and wail, and now entreat someone to help him take his life by setting him the example; anon he reproached himself for his cowardice in such words as these: "To live is a scandal and a shame — this does not become Nero, does not become him — one should be resolute at such times — come, rouse thyself!" And now the horsemen were at hand who had orders to take him off alive. When he heard them, he quavered: "Hark, now strikes on my ear the trampling of swift-footed coursers!" and drove a dagger into his throat, aided by Epaphroditus, his private secretary.,He was all but dead when a centurion rushed in, and as he placed a cloak to the wound, pretending that he had come to aid him, Nero merely gasped: "Too late!" and "This is fidelity!" With these words he was gone, with eyes so set and starting from their sockets that all who saw him shuddered with horror. First and beyond all else he had forced from his companions a promise to let no one have his head, but to contrive in some way that he be buried unmutilated. And this was granted by Icelus, Galba's freedman, who had shortly before been released from the bondage to which he was consigned at the beginning of the revolt.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 1.8, 4.197 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.8. However, some persons there were who desired to know our history, and so exhorted me to go on with it; and, above all the rest, Epaphroditus, a man who is a lover of all kind of learning, but is principally delighted with the knowledge of history, and this on account of his having been himself concerned in great affairs, and many turns of fortune, and having shown a wonderful vigor of an excellent nature, and an immovable virtuous resolution in them all. 1.8. 3. This calamity happened in the six hundredth year of Noah’s government, [age,] in the second month, called by the Macedonians Dius, but by the Hebrews Marchesuan: for so did they order their year in Egypt. 4.197. only we shall so far innovate, as to digest the several kinds of laws into a regular system; for they were by him left in writing as they were accidentally scattered in their delivery, and as he upon inquiry had learned them of God. On which account I have thought it necessary to premise this observation beforehand, lest any of my own countrymen should blame me, as having been guilty of an offense herein.
2. Suetonius, Augustus, 99 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Suetonius, Caligula, 60 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Suetonius, Claudius, 44 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Suetonius, Domitianus, 2.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Suetonius, Tiberius, 73 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Suetonius, Vitellius, 11 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Tacitus, Annals, 6.5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6.5.  Next Cotta Messalinus, father of every barbarous proposal and therefore the object of inveterate dislike, found himself, on the first available occasion, indicted for hinting repeatedly that the sex of Gaius Caesar was an open question; for dining with the priests on Augusta's birthday and describing the function as a wake; for adding, when he was complaining of the influence of Manius Lepidus and Lucius Arruntius, his opponents in a money dispute:— "The senate will side with them, but my pretty little Tiberius with me." The whole of the charges were proved against him by men of the highest position; and, as they pressed their case, he appealed to the emperor. Before long came a letter; in which Tiberius, by way of defence, harked back to the origin of the friendship between himself and Cotta, commemorated his many services, and desired that mischievously perverted phrases and the frankness of table-talk should not be turned into evidence of guilt.
9. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 67.9 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
augustus, emperor, 163, 164 Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 164
claudius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 192
closure Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
death Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
domitian, death of Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
domitian Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 192; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132; Westwood, Moses among the Greek Lawgivers: Reading Josephus’ Antiquities through Plutarch’s Lives (2023) 13
epaphroditus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 192; Westwood, Moses among the Greek Lawgivers: Reading Josephus’ Antiquities through Plutarch’s Lives (2023) 13
exile Westwood, Moses among the Greek Lawgivers: Reading Josephus’ Antiquities through Plutarch’s Lives (2023) 13
flavian, epic Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
flavian Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
funeral, mock Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
funeral Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
hannibal Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
homer, iliad Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 121
la harpe, jean-françois de, aux mânes de lucain Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 120, 121
lucan, biofictional reception in peri-revolutionary france Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 120, 121
lucan, republicanised in la harpes translation Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 120, 121
macro, q. sartorius Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 164
metus hannibalis Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 192
nero, as character in la harpes aux mânes de lucain Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 120, 121
nero, emperor Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 164
nero Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 192; Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
phyllis (domitians nurse) Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
priest Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
religion Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
ritual, mocked Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
ritual Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
sacrilege Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
scipio (africanus) Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
shakespeare, william, as you like it Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 164
suetonius, life of nero Goldschmidt, Biofiction and the Reception of Latin Poetry (2019) 120, 121
suetonius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 192
suetonius tranquillus, c. Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 164
tiberius, emperor, accession Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 164
tiberius, emperor, death' Galinsky, Memory in Ancient Rome and Early Christianity (2016) 164
tiberius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 192
titus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 192
triumph Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132
vespasian Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 192
vitellius Roumpou, Ritual and the Poetics of Closure in Flavian Literature (2023) 132