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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10518
Suetonius, Nero, 31


nanThere was nothing however in which he was more ruinously prodigal than in building. He made a palace extending all the way from the Palatine to the Esquiline, which at first he called the House of Passage, but when it was burned shortly after its completion and rebuilt, the Golden House. Its size and splendour will be sufficiently indicated by the following details. Its vestibule was large enough to contain a colossal statue of the emperor a hundred and twenty feet high; and it was so extensive that it had a triple colonnade a mile long. There was a pond too, like a sea, surrounded with buildings to represent cities, besides tracts of country, varied by tilled fields, vineyards, pastures and woods, with great numbers of wild and domestic animals.,In the rest of the house all parts were overlaid with gold and adorned with gems and mother-of‑pearl. There were dining-rooms with fretted ceils of ivory, whose panels could turn and shower down flowers and were fitted with pipes for sprinkling the guests with perfumes. The main banquet hall was circular and constantly revolved day and night, like the heavens. He had baths supplied with sea water and sulphur water. When the edifice was finished in this style and he dedicated it, he deigned to say nothing more in the way of approval than that he was at last beginning to be housed like a human being.,He also began a pool, extending from Misenum to the lake of Avernus, roofed over and enclosed in colonnades, into which he planned to turn all the hot springs in every part of Baiae; a canal from Avernus all the way to Ostia, to enable the journey to be made by ship yet not by sea; its length was to be a hundred and sixty miles and its breadth sufficient to allows ships with five banks of oars to pass each other. For the execution of these projects he had given orders that the prisoners all over the empire should be transported to Italy, and that those who were convicted even of capital crimes should be punished in no other way than by sentence to this work.,He was led to such mad extravagance, in addition to his confidence in the resources of the empire, by the hope of a vast hidden treasure, suddenly inspired by the assurance of a Roman knight, who declared positively that the enormous wealth which queen Dido had taken with her of old in her flight from Tyre was hidden away in huge caves in Africa and could be recovered with but trifling labour.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

23 results
1. Homer, Odyssey, 5.59-5.61 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, On Laws, 2.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 3.11 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.11. quod aliis quoque multis locis reperietur; reperitur G 1 sed id alias, nunc, quod instat. totum igitur id alt. id om. H s quod quaerimus quid et quale sit, sit fit V verbi vis ipsa declarat. eos enim sanos quoniam intellegi necesse est, quorum mens motu quasi morbo perturbata nullo nulla X corr. V 1? sit, qui quia K 1 contra adfecti affecti GR 2 insani G 1 sint, hos insanos appellari necesse est. itaque nihil melius, quam quod est in consuetudine sermonis Latini, cum exisse ex potestate dicimus eos, qui ecfrenati hecfrenati G (h del. 2 ) hęc fr. V effr. R rec V rec feruntur aut libidine aut iracundia— quamquam ipsa iracundia libidinis est pars; sic enim definitur: iracundia ulciscendi libido ulciscendi libido cf. Aug. civ. 14,15 quis V 1 —; qui igitur exisse ex potestate dicimus ... 20 ex potestate om. H dicuntur, idcirco dicuntur, quia non sint in potestate mentis, cui regnum totius animi a natura tributum est. Graeci autem mani/an manian X (man in r. V 1 ) appellant X unde appellent, non facile dixerim; eam tamen ipsam ipsa KGH (ipsāR, sed vix m. 1 ) distinguimus nos melius quam illi. hanc enim insaniam, quae iuncta stultitiae stultitiae K 2 V c BGr.(?) stultitia X patet latius, nos post latius add. V c a furore disiungimus. distinguimus R Graeci volunt illi quidem, sed parum valent verbo: quem nos furorem, melagxoli/an melancholian GV -iam KRH illi vocant; quasi vero atra bili atribili V 1 K (-bi li) atra- bili GR solum mens ac non non add. R c saepe vel iracundia graviore vel timore vel timore add. G 2 vel dolore moveatur; totum . . 322, 3 moveatur H quo genere Athamantem Alcmaeonem alomeonem K 1 alc meonem V (on in r. V c ) Aiacem Orestem furere dicimus. qui ita sit adfectus, eum dominum esse rerum suarum vetant duodecim duodecem R 1 V tab. 5, 7. Ciceronis locus obversatur Horatio s. 2, 3, 217 tabulae; itaque non est scriptum si insanus, sed si furiosus insanus et fur. Non. escit Bouhier esse incipit W esset Non. escit . stultitiam stultiam V ( ss rec ) stultia K (- 2 ) stultitia GR 1 (-ă 2 ) H enim censuerunt constantia, inconstantiam KR ( etiam m a m. 1 ut. v. ) V 1 ( sed in et m exp. 1 ) H inconstantia G insaniam enim censuerunt constantiam, id est sanitatem, tamen posse tueri Non. id est sanitate, vacantem posse tamen tueri mediocritatem officiorum et vitae communem cultum atque usitatum; furorem autem autem om. Non. esse rati sunt mentis ad omnia caecitatem. quod cum maius magis R 1 esse videatur quam insania, tamen eius modi est, ut furor in sapientem cadere possit, non possit insania. itaque stultitia censuerunt ... 13 insania itaque ... 13 cadere possit, insania non Non. 443, 2 sed haec alia quaestio est; nos ad propositum revertamur.
4. Catullus, Poems, 64.87-64.88 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Horace, Sermones, 2.8 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.8. 2. Now, although I cannot but think that I have already demonstrated, and that abundantly, more than was necessary, that our fathers were not originally Egyptians, nor were thence expelled, either on account of bodily diseases, or any other calamities of that sort 2.8. for Apion hath the impudence to pretend, that “the Jews placed an ass’s head in their holy place;” and he affirms that this was discovered when Antiochus Epiphanes spoiled our temple, and found that ass’s head there made of gold, and worth a great deal of money.
6. Lucretius Carus, On The Nature of Things, 4.687, 4.1069 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Vergil, Aeneis, 7.12-7.13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.12. And with far-trembling glory smites the sea. 7.13. Close to the lands of Circe soon they fare
8. Juvenal, Satires, 5 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Martial, Spectacula, 2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 26 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 1.12.4, 2.2.2 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Seneca The Younger, On Anger, 1.20.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 95.19, 95.21, 95.37 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Suetonius, Augustus, 76 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

16. Suetonius, Caligula, 18.3, 30.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

17. Suetonius, De Grammaticis, 17.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

18. Tacitus, Annals, 15.42 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

15.42.  However, Nero turned to account the ruins of his fatherland by building a palace, the marvels of which were to consist not so much in gems and gold, materials long familiar and vulgarized by luxury, as in fields and lakes and the air of solitude given by wooded ground alternating with clear tracts and open landscapes. The architects and engineers were Severus and Celer, who had the ingenuity and the courage to try the force of art even against the veto of nature and to fritter away the resources of a Caesar. They had undertaken to sink a navigable canal running from Lake Avernus to the mouths of the Tiber along a desolate shore or through intervening hills; for the one district along the route moist enough to yield a supply of water is the Pomptine Marsh; the rest being cliff and sand, which could be cut through, if at all, only by intolerable exertions for which no sufficient motive existed. None the less, Nero, with his passion for the incredible, made an effort to tunnel the height nearest the Avernus, and some evidences of that futile ambition survive.
19. Tacitus, Histories, 1.27 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

20. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.23 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

21. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 53.27 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

53.27. 1.  Meanwhile Agrippa beautified the city at his own expense. First, in honour of the naval victories he completed the building called the Basilica of Neptune and lent it added brilliance by the painting representing the Argonauts. Next he constructed the Laconian sudatorium. He gave the name "Laconian" to the gymnasium because the Lacedaemonians had a greater reputation at that time than anybody else for stripping and exercising after anointing themselves with oil.,2.  Also he completed the building called the (Opens in another window)')" onMouseOut="nd();" Pantheon. It has this name, perhaps because it received among the images which decorated it the statues of many gods, including Mars and Venus; but my own opinion of the name is that, because of its vaulted roof, it resembles the heavens.,3.  Agrippa, for his part, wished to place a statue of Augustus there also and to bestow upon him the honour of having the structure named after him; but when the emperor wouldn't accept either honour, he placed in the temple itself a statue of the former Caesar and in the ante-room statues of Augustus and himself.,4.  This was done, not out of any rivalry or ambition on Agrippa's part to make himself equal to Augustus, but from his hearty loyalty to him and his constant zeal for the public good; hence Augustus, so far from censuring him for it, honoured them the more.,5.  For example, when he himself was prevented by illness from being in Rome at that time and celebrating there the marriage of his daughter Julia and his nephew Marcellus, he commissioned Agrippa to hold the festival in his absence; and when the house on the Palatine Mount which had formerly belonged to Antony but had later been given to Agrippa and Messalla was burned down, he presented money to Messalla, but made Agrippa share his own house.,6.  Agrippa not unnaturally took great pride in these honours. And one Gaius Toranius also acquired a good reputation because while tribune he brought his father, although a freedman of somebody or other, into the theatre and made him sit beside him upon the tribunes' bench. Publius Servilius, too, made a name for himself because while praetor he caused to be slain at a festival three hundred bears and other African wild beasts equal in number.
22. Scriptores Historiae Augustae, Hadrian, 19.12 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

23. Velleius Paterculus, Roman History, 2.81.3



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
accius atreus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
animals Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 205
apollonius rhodius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
argos Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
ariadne Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 41
assimilated in rome Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 42
atreus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
augustus, house of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 340
bodies fluid Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 205
calypso Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 41
castration Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 205
ceilings Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 340
christ, christian, christianity Faßbeck and Killebrew, Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili (2016) 440
cicero, and seneca Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
cicero, tyranny Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
circe Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 41
death Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 205
decay Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 205
deformity Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 205
domus aurea, egyptian motifs in Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 42
emperors and egypt, nero Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 42
emperors and egypt, octavian-augustus Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 42
excrement Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 205
fear, and hatred Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
fear, as principle of government or ruling device Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
fear, lexicon of Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
flesh Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 205
foul Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 205
golden house of nero Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 41, 340
greece, greek Faßbeck and Killebrew, Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili (2016) 440
homers influence on virgil Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 41
hope, and madness Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 17
house of augustus Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 340
jerusalem Faßbeck and Killebrew, Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili (2016) 440
kosmos, and arrangement Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 242
latium Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 41
light, in enclosed spaces Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 41
microcosm Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 242
nero, emperor, interested in aegyptiaca Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 42
nero Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50; Faßbeck and Killebrew, Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili (2016) 440; Horkey, Cosmos in the Ancient World (2019) 242; Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 17
nilus, architectural feature Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 42
other Faßbeck and Killebrew, Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili (2016) 440
pelias, and/as atreus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
pelias Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
petronius Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 205
phantasia Kazantzidis and Spatharas, Hope in Ancient Literature, History, and Art (2018) 17
rome, roman Faßbeck and Killebrew, Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili (2016) 440
seneca, thy. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
smells of the city Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 41
sol (helios), solar worship Faßbeck and Killebrew, Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili (2016) 440
statue' Faßbeck and Killebrew, Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili (2016) 440
suetonius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
tacitus, works annales (annals) Fertik, The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome (2019) 183
thyestes Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 50
tiberius, gaius caligula Fertik, The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome (2019) 183
tiberius, nero Fertik, The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome (2019) 183
tiberius, works de grammaticis Fertik, The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome (2019) 183
velleius paterculus, roman history Fertik, The Ruler's House: Contesting Power and Privacy in Julio-Claudian Rome (2019) 183
vespasian Faßbeck and Killebrew, Viewing Ancient Jewish Art and Archaeology: VeHinnei Rachel - Essays in honor of Rachel Hachlili (2016) 440
wall-paintings Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 340
women, elderly Lateiner and Spatharas, The Ancient Emotion of Disgust (2016) 205
women, scents of Jenkyns, God, Space, and City in the Roman Imagination (2013) 41