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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10517
Suetonius, Iulius, 80


nan It was this that led the conspirators to hasten in carrying out their designs, in order to avoid giving their assent to this proposal. Therefore the plots which had previously been formed separately, often by groups of two or three, were united in a general conspiracy, since even the populace no longer were pleased with present conditions, but both secretly and openly rebelled at his tyranny and cried out for defenders of their liberty., On the admission of foreigners to the Senate, a placard was posted: "God bless the Commonwealth! let no one consent to point out the House to a newly made senator." The following verses too were sung everywhere:— "Caesar led the Gauls in triumph, led them to the senate house; Then the Gauls put off their breeches, and put on the laticlave.", When Quintus Maximus, whom he had appointed consul in his place for three months, was entering the theatre, and his lictor called attention to his arrival in the usual manner, a general shout was raised: "He's no consul!" At the first election after the deposing of Caesetius and Marullus, the tribunes, several votes were found for their appointment as consuls. Some wrote on the base of Lucius Brutus' statue: "Oh, that you were still alive"; and on that of Caesar himself: "First of all was Brutus consul, since he drove the kings from Rome; Since this man drove out the consuls, he at last is made our king.", More than sixty joined the conspiracy against him, led by Gaius Cassius and Marcus and Decimus Brutus. At first they hesitated whether to form two divisions at the elections in the Campus Martius, so that while some hurled him from the bridge as he summoned the tribes to vote, the rest might wait below and slay him; or to set upon him in the Sacred Way or at the entrance to the theatre. When, however, a meeting of the Senate was called for the Ides of March in the Hall of Pompey, they readily gave that time and place the preference.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Cicero, In Verrem, 2.5.77 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Vitruvius Pollio, On Architecture, 1.1.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Appian, Civil Wars, 2.108 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Lucan, Pharsalia, 10.63, 10.66, 10.68, 10.70 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, Mark Antony, 12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Statius, Siluae, 3.2.101-3.2.126 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Suetonius, Iulius, 80.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Tacitus, Annals, 12.7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

12.7.  Members were not lacking to rush from the curia, with emulous protestations that, if the emperor hesitated, they would proceed by force. A motley crowd flocked together, and clamoured that such also was the prayer of the Roman people. Waiting no longer, Claudius met them in the Forum, and offered himself to their felicitations, then entered the senate, and requested a decree legitimizing for the future also the union of uncles with their brothers' daughters. None the less, only a single enthusiast for that form of matrimony was discovered — the Roman knight Alledius Severus, whose motive was generally said to have been desire for the favour of Agrippina. — From this moment it was a changed state, and all things moved at the fiat of a woman — but not a woman who, as Messalina, treated in wantonness the Roman Empire as a toy. It was a tight-drawn, almost masculine tyranny: in public, there was austerity and not infrequently arrogance; at home, no trace of unchastity, unless it might contribute to power. A limitless passion for gold had the excuse of being designed to create a bulwark of despotism.
9. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 2.8.6-2.8.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 8.14.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 8.14.5 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actium, in statius propempticon Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 191
alexandria, statius celer in Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 191
ampudius, m. Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
augustus (previously octavian), builds temple of mars, relationship Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
caesar Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 123
cassius chaerea Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
celer, maecius, protégé of isis Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 191
cleopatra vii, as new isis Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 191
comitia Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 123
consul Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 123
cosmopolitanism, flavian Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 191
curia julia, decoration Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
curia julia Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
dio cassius as consul, as senator Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
egypt, tourist destination Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 191
elagabalus, decorates curia Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
elections Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 123
emperors and egypt, titus Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 191
gaius (caligula), elevated Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
geography Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 191
hortalus, m. Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
humour Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 123
imperial patron Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 191
insider and outsider, reveals knowledge' Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 191
isaeum campense, temple of isis, and sistrum Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 191
late-republican political system Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 123
mob, influence of Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
palatine Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
programmata Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 123
senate, in latin and greek, confidentiality Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
senate, in latin and greek, public interest Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
senators absences, children Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
statues Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 123
tabellae Tacoma, Cicero and Roman Education: The Reception of the Speeches and Ancient Scholarship (2020) 123
triumph Manolaraki, Noscendi Nilum Cupido: Imagining Egypt from Lucan to Philostratus (2012) 191
victory, statue of Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196
vitellius, l. Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 196