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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10517
Suetonius, Iulius, 56.7


nan We also have mention of certain writings of his boyhood and early youth, such as the "Praises of Hercules," a tragedy "Oedipus," and a "Collection of Apophthegms"; but Augustus forbade the publication of all these minor works in a very brief and frank letter sent to Pompeius Macer, whom he had selected to set his libraries in order.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Horace, Letters, 1.3.17, 2.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.1. 1. After the death of Isaac, his sons divided their habitations respectively; nor did they retain what they had before; but Esau departed from the city of Hebron, and left it to his brother, and dwelt in Seir, and ruled over Idumea. He called the country by that name from himself, for he was named Adom; which appellation he got on the following occasion:— 2.1. This affection of his father excited the envy and the hatred of his brethren; as did also his dreams which he saw, and related to his father, and to them, which foretold his future happiness, it being usual with mankind to envy their very nearest relations such their prosperity. Now the visions which Joseph saw in his sleep were these:— 2.1. 3. Now these brethren of his were under distraction and terror, and thought that very great danger hung over them; yet not at all reflecting upon their brother Joseph, and standing firm under the accusations laid against them, they made their defense by Reubel, the eldest of them, who now became their spokesman:
2. Ovid, Epistulae Ex Ponto, 3.9.53-3.9.54 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

3. Ovid, Tristia, 3.1.59-3.1.68 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

4. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 35.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Suetonius, Augustus, 29.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Suetonius, De Grammaticis, 20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Suetonius, De Historicis, 20 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Suetonius, Iulius, 44.2, 56.5-56.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Tacitus, Annals, 2.37, 2.83 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.37.  In addition, he gave monetary help to several senators; so that it was the more surprising when he treated the application of the young noble, Marcus Hortalus, with a superciliousness uncalled for in view of his clearly straitened circumstances. He was a grandson of the orator Hortensius; and the late Augustus, by the grant of a million sesterces, had induced him to marry and raise a family, in order to save his famous house from extinction. With his four sons, then, standing before the threshold of the Curia, he awaited his turn to speak; then, directing his gaze now to the portrait of Hortensius among the orators (the senate was meeting in the Palace), now to that of Augustus, he opened in the following manner:— "Conscript Fathers, these children whose number and tender age you see for yourselves, became mine not from any wish of my own, but because the emperor so advised, and because, at the same time, my ancestors had earned the right to a posterity. For to me, who in this changed world had been able to inherit nothing and acquire nothing, — not money, nor popularity, nor eloquence, that general birthright of our house, — to me it seemed enough if my slender means were neither a disgrace to myself nor a burden to my neighbour. At the command of the sovereign, I took a wife; and here you behold the stock of so many consuls, the offspring of so many dictators! I say it, not to awaken odium, but to woo compassion. Some day, Caesar, under your happy sway, they will wear whatever honours you have chosen to bestow: in the meantime, rescue from beggary the great-grandsons of Quintus Hortensius, the fosterlings of the deified Augustus! 2.83.  Affection and ingenuity vied in discovering and decreeing honours to Germanicus: his name was to be chanted in the Saliar Hymn; curule chairs surmounted by oaken crowns were to be set for him wherever the Augustal priests had right of place; his effigy in ivory was to lead the procession at the Circus Games, and no flamen or augur, unless of the Julian house, was to be created in his room. Arches were added, at Rome, on the Rhine bank, and on the Syrian mountain of Amanus, with an inscription recording his achievements and the fact that he had died for his country. There was to be a sepulchre in Antioch, where he had been cremated; a funeral monument in Epidaphne, the suburb in which he had breathed his last. His statues, and the localities in which his cult was to be practised, it would be difficult to enumerate. When it was proposed to give him a gold medallion, as remarkable for the size as for the material, among the portraits of the classic orators, Tiberius declared that he would dedicate one himself "of the customary type, and in keeping with the rest: for eloquence was not measured by fortune, and its distinction enough if he ranked with the old masters." The equestrian order renamed the so‑called "junior section" in their part of the theatre after Germanicus, and ruled that on the fifteenth of July the cavalcade should ride behind his portrait. Many of these compliments remain: others were discontinued immediately, or have lapsed with the years.
10. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 53.1.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

53.1.3.  At this particular time, now, besides attending to his other duties as usual, he completed the taking of the census, in connection with which his title was princeps senatus, as had been the practice when Rome was truly a republic. Moreover, he completed and dedicated the temple of Apollo on the Palatine, the precinct surrounding it, and the libraries.
11. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.1. To Septicius. You have constantly urged me to collect and publish the more highly finished of the letters that I may have written. I have made such a collection, but without preserving the order in which they were composed, as I was not writing a historical narrative. So I have taken them as they happened to come to hand. I can only hope that you will not have cause to regret the advice you gave, and that I shall not repent having followed it; for I shall set to work to recover such letters as have up to now been tossed on one side, and I shall not keep back any that I may write in the future. Farewell..
12. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 1.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.1. To Septicius. You have constantly urged me to collect and publish the more highly finished of the letters that I may have written. I have made such a collection, but without preserving the order in which they were composed, as I was not writing a historical narrative. So I have taken them as they happened to come to hand. I can only hope that you will not have cause to regret the advice you gave, and that I shall not repent having followed it; for I shall set to work to recover such letters as have up to now been tossed on one side, and I shall not keep back any that I may write in the future. Farewell..


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
allusion Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
apollo Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
architecture Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
archive Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
augustan poetry book Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
augustus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
authenticity Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
benefactor Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
bibliotheca palatina Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 156
brutus, marcus iunius Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
caesar, c. iulius Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
cicero, m. tullius Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
cult, imperial ( Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
documents, legal and administrative Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
drusus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
editor Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
ekphrasis Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
enargeia Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
epistolary genre Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
friendship Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
germanicus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
horace, and fake letter in circulation Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 281
horace Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
horatius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
hortensius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
hyginus (librarian) Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 156
julius caesar, c. Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
julius caesar, planned a massive library Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 156
latin Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
libraries, private and public Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 156
library, administration of Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
library, imperial Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
library Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
literary criticism Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
ostia relief Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 281
pliny the younger Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
pollio, asinius Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 156
pompeius macer Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297; Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 156
porticus octaviae Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 156
portrait, clipeus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
portrait, drusus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
portrait, germanicus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
portrait, hortensius Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
privacy Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
rhetoric Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
roman, power Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
rule, rome, city of Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
rule, senate Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
rule, temple of apollo palatinus Borg, Paideia: the World of the Second Sophistic: The World of the Second Sophistic (2008) 297
seneca, l. annaeus Soldo and Jackson, ›Res vera, res ficta‹: Fictionality in Ancient Epistolography (2023) 211
temples and shrines, of apollo palatinus Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 156
temples and shrines, of libertas Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 156
varro of reate, julius caesars choice to run his planned library Hay, Saeculum: Defining Historical Eras in Ancient Roman Thought (2023) 156
vergil, and book fraud' Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 281