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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10517
Suetonius, Iulius, 55.3


nan He left several speeches, including some which are attributed to him on insufficient evidence. Augustus had good reason to think that the speech "For Quintus Metellus" was rather taken down by shorthand writers who could not keep pace with his delivery, than published by Caesar himself; for in some copies I find that even the title is not "For Metellus," but, "Which he wrote for Metellus," although the discourse purports to be from Caesar's lips, defending Metellus and himself against the charges of their common detractors.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 1.1 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.1. Vetus opinio est iam usque ab heroicis ducta temporibus, eaque et populi Romani et omnium gentium firmata consensu, versari quandam inter homines divinationem, quam Graeci mantikh/n appellant, id est praesensionem et scientiam rerum futurarum. Magnifica quaedam res et salutaris, si modo est ulla, quaque proxime ad deorum vim natura mortalis possit accedere. Itaque ut alia nos melius multa quam Graeci, sic huic praestantissimae rei nomen nostri a divis, Graeci, ut Plato interpretatur, a furore duxerunt. 1.1. Book I[1] There is an ancient belief, handed down to us even from mythical times and firmly established by the general agreement of the Roman people and of all nations, that divination of some kind exists among men; this the Greeks call μαντική — that is, the foresight and knowledge of future events. A really splendid and helpful thing it is — if only such a faculty exists — since by its means men may approach very near to the power of gods. And, just as we Romans have done many other things better than the Greeks, so have we excelled them in giving to this most extraordinary gift a name, which we have derived from divi, a word meaning gods, whereas, according to Platos interpretation, they have derived it from furor, a word meaning frenzy. 1.1. Why, my dear Quintus, said I, you are defending the very citadel of the Stoics in asserting the interdependence of these two propositions: if there is divination there are gods, and, if there are gods there is divination. But neither is granted as readily as you think. For it is possible that nature gives signs of future events without the intervention of a god, and it may be that there are gods without their having conferred any power of divination upon men.To this he replied, I, at any rate, find sufficient proof to satisfy me of the existence of the gods and of their concern in human affairs in my conviction that there are some kinds of divination which are clear and manifest. With your permission I will set forth my views on this subject, provided you are at leisure and have nothing else which you think should be preferred to such a discussion. 1.1. And what do you say of the following story which we find in our annals? During the Veientian War, when Lake Albanus had overflowed its banks, a certain nobleman of Veii deserted to us and said that, according to the prophecies of the Veientian books, their city could not be taken while the lake was at flood, and that if its waters were permitted to overflow and take their own course to the sea the result would be disastrous to the Roman people; on the other hand, if the waters were drained off in such a way that they did not reach the sea the result would be to our advantage. In consequence of this announcement our forefathers dug that marvellous canal to drain off the waters from the Alban lake. Later when the Veientians had grown weary of war and had sent ambassadors to the Senate to treat for peace, one of them is reported to have said that the deserter had not dared to tell the whole of the prophecy contained in the Veientian books, for those books, he said, also foretold the early capture of Rome by the Gauls. And this, as we know, did occur six years after the fall of Veii. [45]
2. Cicero, On Invention, 2.153 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.153. contra ratiocinationem huiusmodi: coniecturam divinationem esse et stulti scriptoris esse non posse om- nibus de rebus cavere, quibus velit. Definitio est, cum in scripto verbum aliquod est positum, cuius de vi quaeritur, hoc modo: lex: qui in adversa tempestate navem reliquerint, omnia amittunto; eorum navis et onera sunto, qui in nave remanserint . Duo quidam, cum iam in alto navigarent, et cum eorum alterius navis, alterius onus esset, naufragum quendam natantem et manus ad se tendentem animum adverterunt; misericordia commoti navem ad eum adplicarunt, hominem ad se sustulerunt.
3. Cicero, De Oratore, 1.199-1.200 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.199. Senectuti vero celebrandae et ordae quod honestius potest esse perfugium quam iuris interpretatio? Equidem mihi hoc subsidium iam inde ab adulescentia comparavi, non solum ad causarum usum forensem, sed etiam ad decus atque ornamentum senectutis, ut, cum me vires, quod fere iam tempus adventat, deficere coepissent, ista ab solitudine domum meam vindicarem. Quid est enim praeclarius quam honoribus et rei publicae muneribus perfunctum senem posse suo iure dicere idem, quod apud Ennium dicat ille Pythius Apollo, se esse eum, unde sibi, si non populi et reges, at omnes sui cives consilium expetant, summarum rerum incerti: quos ego ope mea †ex incertis certos compotesque consili dimitto, ut ne res temere tractent turbidas: 1.200. est enim sine dubio domus iuris consulti totius oraculum civitatis; testis est huiusce Q. Muci ianua et vestibulum, quod in eius infirmissima valetudine adfectaque iam aetate maxima cotidie frequentia civium ac summorum hominum splendore celebratur.
4. Cicero, Pro Sulla, 42-44, 41 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

41. vidi ego hoc, iudices iudices vidi Ta : om. e , nisi recenti memoria senatus auctoritatem huius indici monumentis publicis testatus essem, fore ut aliquando non Torquatus neque Torquati quispiam similis—nam id me multum fefellit—sed ut aliquis patrimoni patrimonii Te, Schol. : patrimonio cett. naufragus, inimicus oti, bonorum hostis, aliter indicata indic. Ta : iudic. cett. haec esse diceret, quo facilius vento aliquo in optimum quemque excitato posset in malis rei publicae portum aliquem aliquem hoc loco hab. Tec, post malorum cett. suorum malorum invenire. itaque introductis in senatum indicibus constitui institui Schol. senatores qui omnia indicum dicta, interrogata, responsa perscriberent.
5. Ovid, Tristia, 3.14.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Martial, Epigrams, 1.2, 1.113, 1.117, 13.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Martial, Epigrams, 1.2, 1.113, 1.117, 13.3 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
apollo Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 55
atrectus Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
bookseller, and publishing Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
bookseller, work Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
carmen Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 55
cicero, circulation of works without approval of Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
commentaries, unauthorized address of circulated Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
diuinare/divinare Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 55
diuinatio/divinatio Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 55
epistles (horace) Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
extispicy Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 55
gavius bassus Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 55
horace, epistles Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
horace, on publication Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
julius caesar, c. Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 55
librarius, use of to record speeches Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
martial, and booksellers Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
mucius scaevola, q. (cos. Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 55
ovid, and bookseller Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
publication, and booksellers Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
publication, horace on Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
quintilian, unauthorized works of Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
scientia Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 55
secundus Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
signs' Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 55
sosius brothers, and horace Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
suetonius Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
trypho Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
tullius cicero, m. Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 55
valerianus, pollius Johnson and Parker, ?Ancient Literacies: The Culture of Reading in Greece and Rome (2009) 279
verres Santangelo, Roman Frugality: Modes of Moderation from the Archaic Age to the Early Empire and Beyond (2013) 55