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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10514
Suetonius, Domitianus, 8


nan He administered justice scrupulously and conscientiously, frequently holding special sittings on the tribunal in the Forum. He rescinded such decisions of the Hundred Judges as were made from interested motives. He often warned the arbiters not to grant claims for freedom made under false pretences. He degraded jurors who accepted bribes, together with all their associates., He also induced the tribunes of the commons to prosecute a corrupt aedile for extortion, and to ask the senate to appoint jurors in the case. He took such care to exercise restraint over the city officials and the governors of the provinces, that at no time were they more honest or just, whereas after his time we have seen many of them charged with all manner of offences., Having undertaken the correction of public morals, he put an end to the licence at the theatres, where the general public occupied the seats reserved for the knights; did away with the prevailing publication of scurrilous lampoons, in which distinguished men and women were attacked, and imposed ignominious penalties on their authors; expelled an ex-quaestor from the senate, because he was given to acting and dancing; deprived notorious women of the use of litters, as well as of the right to receive inheritances and legacies; struck the name of a Roman knight from the list of jurors, because he had taken back his wife after divorcing her and charging her with adultery; condemned several men of both orders, offenders against the Scantinian law; and the incest of Vestal virgins, condoned even by his father and his brother, he punished severely in divers ways, at first by capital punishment, and afterwards in the ancient fashion., For while he allowed the sisters Oculata and also Varronilla free choice of the manner of their death, and banished their paramours, he later ordered that Cornelia, a chief-vestal who had been acquitted once but after a long interval again arraigned and found guilty, be buried alive; and her lovers were beaten to death with rods in the Comitium, with the exception of an ex-praetor, whom he allowed to go into exile, because he admitted his guilt while the case was still unsettled and the examination and torture of the witnesses had led to no result., To protect the gods from being dishonoured with impunity by any sacrilege, he caused a tomb which one of his freedmen had built for his son from stones intended for the temple of Jupiter of the Capitol to be destroyed by the soldiers and the bones and ashes contained in it thrown into the sea.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

13 results
1. Cicero, On Laws, 2.37 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2. Juvenal, Satires, 1.26-1.29 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3. Martial, Epigrams, 8.48 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Martial, Epigrams, 8.48 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

5. Suetonius, Caligula, 33-35, 16 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Suetonius, Claudius, 15 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Suetonius, Domitianus, 7 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Suetonius, Nero, 15 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Suetonius, Vespasianus, 10 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Tacitus, Annals, 14.18, 14.46 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

14.18.  Pedius Blaesus also was removed from the senate: he was charged by the Cyrenaeans with profaning the treasury of Aesculapius and falsifying the military levy by venality and favouritism. An indictment was brought, again by Cyrene, against Acilius Strabo, who had held praetorian office and been sent by Claudius to adjudicate on the estates, once the patrimony of King Apion, which he had bequeathed along with his kingdom to the Roman nation. They had been annexed by the neighbouring proprietors, who relied on their long-licensed usurpation as a legal and fair title. Hence, when the adjudication went against them, there was an outbreak of ill-will against the adjudicator; and the senate could only answer that it was ignorant of Claudius' instructions and the emperor would have to be consulted. Nero, while upholding Strabo's verdict, wrote that none the less he supported the provincials and made over to them the property occupied. 14.46.  Under the same consulate, Tarquitius Priscus was found guilty of extortion, at the suit of the Bithynians, much to the joy of the senate, which remembered his accusation of Statilius Taurus, his own proconsul. In the Gallic provinces, an assessment was held by Quintus Volusius, Sextius Africanus, and Trebellius Maximus. Between Volusius and Africanus there subsisted a rivalry due to their rank: for Trebellius they entertained a common contempt, which enabled him to surpass them both.
11. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 7.33 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.33. To Tacitus. I venture to prophesy - and I know my prognostics are right - that your histories will be immortal, and that, I frankly confess, makes me the more anxious to figure in them. For if it is quite an ordinary thing for us to take care to secure the best painter to paint our portrait, ought we not also to be desirous of getting an author and historian of your calibre to describe our deeds ? That is why though it could hardly escape your careful eye, as it is to be found in the public records - I bring the following incident before your notice, and I do so in order to assure you how pleased I shall be, if you will lend your powers of description and the weight of your testimony to setting forth the way I behaved on an occasion when I reaped credit, owing to the dangers to which I exposed myself. The senate had appointed me to act with Herennius Senecio on behalf of the province of Baetica in the prosecution of Baebius Massa, * and, when Massa had been sentenced, it decreed that his property should be placed under public custody. Senecio came to me, after finding out that the consuls would be at liberty to hear petitions, and said My conduct on this occasion, whatever its worth may have been, will be made even more famous, more distinguished, and more noble if you describe it, although I do not ask of you to go beyond the strict letter of what actually occurred. For history ought never to transgress against truth, and an honourable action wants nothing more than to be faithfully recorded. Farewell. %%%
12. Pliny The Younger, Letters, 7.33 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.33. To Tacitus. I venture to prophesy - and I know my prognostics are right - that your histories will be immortal, and that, I frankly confess, makes me the more anxious to figure in them. For if it is quite an ordinary thing for us to take care to secure the best painter to paint our portrait, ought we not also to be desirous of getting an author and historian of your calibre to describe our deeds ? That is why though it could hardly escape your careful eye, as it is to be found in the public records - I bring the following incident before your notice, and I do so in order to assure you how pleased I shall be, if you will lend your powers of description and the weight of your testimony to setting forth the way I behaved on an occasion when I reaped credit, owing to the dangers to which I exposed myself. The senate had appointed me to act with Herennius Senecio on behalf of the province of Baetica in the prosecution of Baebius Massa, * and, when Massa had been sentenced, it decreed that his property should be placed under public custody. Senecio came to me, after finding out that the consuls would be at liberty to hear petitions, and said My conduct on this occasion, whatever its worth may have been, will be made even more famous, more distinguished, and more noble if you describe it, although I do not ask of you to go beyond the strict letter of what actually occurred. For history ought never to transgress against truth, and an honourable action wants nothing more than to be faithfully recorded. Farewell. %%%
13. Pliny The Younger, Panegyric, 46.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acilius strabo, l. Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
adjudication, adjudicating Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
administration, administrator Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
africa, repetundae trials Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
anger, conditions for dramatized Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 49
antonius flamma, m. Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
appeal Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
augustus, and actors Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
augustus, and theatre Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
augustus Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
baebius massa Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
baetica, repetundae trials Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
bithynia/pontus, repetundae trials Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
caligula Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
case Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149, 227
censor Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 49
claudius Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
consilium Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
court Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
cyrene (province), repetundae trials Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
dancers Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
di manes Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
domitian Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 49; Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149, 227
domitian (emperor) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
execution Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
father Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
gallus Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
good judge Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
hatred, and cannibalism, and historiography Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 49
impiety Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
impius Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
indignatio, in satiric plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 49
insane, insanity Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
iulius bassus, c, trials of under vespasian Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
ius Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
judge Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149, 227
julius caesar Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107; Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
jurisdiction Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149, 227
justice Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
law Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149, 227
legal system Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
leges sacratae Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
lex coloniae genetiuae luliae ursonensis Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
libertas, exercised by juvenal Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 49
luxury Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 49
magistrate Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
masculinity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 49
mime Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
mommsen, th., religious Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
narrative Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
nero Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
nero (emperor), as citharoedus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
nero (emperor) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
oath Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
pantomimes, and augustus Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
pantomimes, banishment of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
paquius scaevinus Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
patria potestas Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
pedius blaesus Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
perjury Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
piaculum Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
pliny the younger Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
pompeius silvanus staberius flavinus, m. Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
potestas Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
power Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
priests, pontifex maximus Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
principate Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
pylades (pantomime artist) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
religiosus, locus Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
repetundae (misgovernment), trials for, table Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
sacrifice Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
sacrilegium Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
scaevola, quintus mucius Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
senate Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
sin Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
stephanion (pantomime artist) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
suetonius Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149, 227
tacitus Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
tacitus (historian) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
tarquitius priscus, m. Talbert, The Senate of Imperial Rome (1984) 509
temple, capitoline Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
terror Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
tiberius Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26; Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
tiberius (emperor) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
tomb regulations Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
tradition, roman religious Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26
trajan Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 49
trajan (emperor) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 107
vespasian Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 149
virtue' Tuori, The Emperor of Law: The Emergence of Roman Imperial Adjudication< (2016) 227
wissowa, g. Ando and Ruepke, Religion and Law in Classical and Christian Rome (2006) 26