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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10507
Suetonius, Claudius, 35.1


nan But there was nothing for which he was so notorious as timidity and suspicion. Although in the early days of his reign, as we have said, he made a display of simplicity, he never ventured to go to a banquet without being surrounded by guards with lances and having his soldiers wait upon him in place of the servants; and he never visited a man who was ill without having the patient's room examined beforehand and his pillows and bed-clothing felt over and shaken out. Afterwards he even subjected those who came to pay their morning calls to search, sparing none the strictest examination.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Augustus, Res Gestae Divi Augusti, 34, 1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

2. Horace, Epodes, 4.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Juvenal, Satires, 6, 1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4. Seneca The Younger, Apocolocyntosis, 6 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Suetonius, Augustus, 52, 51 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Suetonius, Claudius, 29.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Suetonius, Nero, 30.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Tacitus, Annals, 1.6, 11.28 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.6.  The opening crime of the new principate was the murder of Agrippa Postumus; who, though off his guard and without weapons, was with difficulty dispatched by a resolute centurion. In the senate Tiberius made no reference to the subject: his pretence was an order from his father, instructing the tribune in charge to lose no time in making away with his prisoner, once he himself should have looked his last on the world. It was beyond question that by his frequent and bitter strictures on the youth's character Augustus had procured the senatorial decree for his exile: on the other hand, at no time did he harden his heart to the killing of a relative, and it remained incredible that he should have sacrificed the life of a grandchild in order to diminish the anxieties of a stepson. More probably, Tiberius and Livia, actuated in the one case by fear, and in the other by stepmotherly dislike, hurriedly procured the murder of a youth whom they suspected and detested. To the centurion who brought the usual military report, the emperor rejoined that he had given no instructions and the deed would have to be accounted for in the senate. The remark came to the ears of Sallustius Crispus. A partner in the imperial secrets — it was he who had forwarded the note to the tribune — he feared the charge might be fastened on himself, with the risks equally great whether he spoke the truth or lied. He therefore advised Livia not to publish the mysteries of the palace, the counsels of her friends, the services of the soldiery; and also to watch that Tiberius did not weaken the powers of the throne by referring everything and all things to the senate:— "It was a condition of sovereignty that the account balanced only if rendered to a single auditor. 11.28.  A shudder, then, had passed through the imperial household. In particular, the holders of power with all to fear from a reversal of the established order, gave voice to their indignation, no longer in private colloquies, but without disguise:— "Whilst an actor profaned the imperial bedchamber, humiliation might have been inflicted, but destruction had still been in the far distance. Now, with his stately presence, his vigour of mind, and his impending consulate, a youthful noble was girding himself to a greater ambition — for the sequel of such a marriage was no mystery!" Fear beyond doubt came over them when they considered the hebetude of Claudius, his bondage to his wife, and the many murders perpetrated at the fiat of Messalina. Yet, again, the very pliancy of the emperor gave ground for confidence that, if they carried the day thanks to the atrocity of the charge, they might crush her by making her condemnation precede her trial. But the critical question, they realized, was whether Claudius would give a hearing to her defence, and whether they would be able to close his ears even to her confession.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
addressee, significant naming of Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
addressee, victimization of Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
adviser, satirist as, on marriage Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
agrippina Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
anger, and women Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
augustus, death Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 2
augustus, divine honours Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 2
augustus Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 82
caligula Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 82
censorship Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 82
civilitas Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 2
claudius Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
claudius (emperor) Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 82
economics of status Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 82
emotion, infection with Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
greece Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 82
indignatio, in satiric plot Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
invective Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 82
marriage Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
masculinity Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
messalina Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
moderatio Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 82
modestia Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 82
myth, in rhetorical education Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
nero Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 82
pleasure Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
rhetorical education, controversiae and suasoriae Keane, Juvenal and the Satiric Emotions (2015) 71
self-restrained omnipotence Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 82
statues, melted down to make tripods for apollo Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 2
suetonius Viglietti and Gildenhard, Divination, Prediction and the End of the Roman Republic (2020) 82
temples, of augustus and roma' Xinyue, Politics and Divinization in Augustan Poetry (2022) 2