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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10507
Suetonius, Claudius, 22


nan Touching religious ceremonies and civil and military customs, as well as the condition of all classes at home and abroad, he corrected various abuses, revived some old customs or even established new ones. In admitting priests into the various colleges he never named anyone until he had first taken oath, and he scrupulously observed the custom of having the praetor call an assembly and proclaim a holiday, whenever there was an earthquake within the city; as well as that of offering up a supplication whenever a bird of ill-omen was seen on the Capitol. This last he himself conducted in his capacity of chief priest, first reciting the form of words to the people from the rostra, after all mechanics and slaves had been ordered to withdraw.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

21 results
1. Plautus, Curculio, 482, 481 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Brutus, 158 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, Brutus, 158 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

158. pergamus ergo, inquam, ad reliqua et institutum ordinem persequamur. Paratus igitur veniebat Crassus, exspectabatur, audiebatur; a principio statim, quod erat apud eum semper accuratum, exspectatione dignus videbatur. Non multa iactatio corporis, non inclinatio vocis, nulla inambulatio, non crebra supplosio pedis; vehemens vehemens interdum et irata Campe et interdum irata eL plena iusti doloris oratio, multae et cum gravitate facetiae; quodque difficile est, idem et perornatus et perbrevis; iam in altercando invenit parem neminem.
4. Cicero, De Domo Sua, 140-141, 139 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

139. dum necesse erat resque ipsa cogebat, unus omnia poterat potuerat A ; qui postea quam magistratus creavit legesque constituit, sua cuique procuratio auctoritasque est restituta. quam si retinere volunt volent Richter ei qui reciperarunt in perpetuum poterunt obtinere; sin has caedis et rapinas et hos tantos tamque profusos sumptus aut facient aut approbabunt — nolo in eos gravius quicquam ne ominis ominis Manutius : hominis codd. quidem causa dicere, unum hoc dico: nostri isti nobiles nisi vigilantes et boni et fortes et misericordes erunt, eis hominibus in quibus haec erunt ornamenta sua concedant necesse est.
5. Cicero, In Pisonem, 18 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

6. Cicero, Pro Sestio, 66 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7. Livy, History, 8.9.4, 9.46.6, 10.28.14, 31.9.9, 36.2.3-36.2.5, 41.21.11, 42.28.9 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Martial, Epigrams, 9.59 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 109.9-109.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

11. Petronius Arbiter, Satyricon, 109.9-109.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 28.11 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Seneca The Younger, De Beneficiis, 3.22.1 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

14. Seneca The Younger, De Clementia, 1.19.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

15. Seneca The Younger, De Constantia Sapientis, 13.4 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

16. Tacitus, Annals, 1.28.2-1.28.3, 4.64.1, 12.43 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

4.64.1.  The disaster had not yet faded from memory, when a fierce outbreak of fire affected the city to an unusual degree by burning down the Caelian Hill. "It was a fatal year, and the sovereign's decision to absent himself had been adopted under an evil star" — so men began to remark, converting, as is the habit of the crowd, the fortuitous into the culpable, when the Caesar checked the critics by a distribution of money in proportion to loss sustained. Thanks were returned to him; in the senate, by the noble; in the streets, by the voice of the people: for without respect of persons, and without the intercession of relatives, he had aided with his liberality even unknown sufferers whom he had himself encouraged to apply. Proposals were added that the Caelian Hill should for the future be known as the Augustan, since, with all around on fire, the one thing to remain unscathed had been a bust of Tiberius in the house of the senator Junius. "The same," it was said, "had happened formerly to Claudia Quinta; whose statue, twice escaped from the fury of the flames, our ancestors had dedicated in the temple of the Mother of the Gods. The Claudian race was sacrosanct and acceptable to Heaven, and additional solemnity should be given to the ground on which the gods had shown so notable an honour to the sovereign. 12.43.  Many prodigies occurred during the year. Ominous birds took their seat on the Capitol; houses were overturned by repeated shocks of earthquake, and, as the panic spread, the weak were trampled underfoot in the trepidation of the crowd. A shortage of corn, again, and the famine which resulted, were construed as a supernatural warning. Nor were the complaints always whispered. Claudius, sitting in judgement, was surrounded by a wildly clamorous mob, and, driven into the farthest corner of the Forum, was there subjected to violent pressure, until, with the help of a body of troops, he forced a way through the hostile throng. It was established that the capital had provisions for fifteen days, no more; and the crisis was relieved only by the especial grace of the gods and the mildness of the winter. And yet, Heaven knows, in the past, Italy exported supplies for the legions into remote provinces; nor is sterility the trouble now, but we cultivate Africa and Egypt by preference, and the life of the Roman nation has been staked upon cargo-boats and accidents.
17. Tacitus, Histories, 1.50 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.50.  Rome was in a state of excitement and horror-stricken not only at the recent outrageous crime, but also at the thought of Otho's former character. Now it was terrified in addition by news with regard to Vitellius, which had been suppressed before Galba's death, so that the citizens believed that only the army of Upper Germany had mutinied. Then the thought that two men, the worst in the world for their shamelessness, indolence, and profligacy, had been apparently chosen by fate to ruin the empire, caused open grief not only to the senators and knights who had some share and interest in the state, but even to the common people. Their talk was no longer of the recent horrors of a bloody peace, but they recalled memories of the civil wars and spoke of the many times the city had been captured by Roman armies, of the devastation of Italy, of the plundering of the provinces, of Pharsalia, Philippi, Perusia, and Mutina, names notorious for public disaster. They said that the world had been well-nigh overturned, even when the principate was the prize of honest men; but yet the empire had remained when Julius Caesar won, and had likewise remained when Augustus won; the republic would have remained if Pompey and Brutus had been successful; but now — should they go to the temples to pray for an Otho or a Vitellius? Prayers for either would be impious and vows for either detestable when, in the struggle between the two, the only thing of which men were certain was that the victor would be the worse. There were some who had forebodings of Vespasian and the armies in the East, and yet although Vespasian was a better man than Otho or Vitellius, they shuddered at another war and another massacre. Indeed Vespasian's reputation was uncertain; he, unlike all his predecessors, was the only emperor who was changed for the better by his office.
18. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 4.1.10 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

19. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 53.20.1 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

53.20.1.  Caesar, as I have said, received the name of Augustus, and a sign of no little moment to him occurred that very night; for the Tiber overflowed and covered all of Rome that was on low ground, so that it was navigable for boats. From this sign the soothsayers prophesied that he would rise to great heights and hold the whole city under his sway.
20. Lactantius, Divine Institutes, 9.46.6 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

21. Justinian, Digest, 1.5.5.1 (5th cent. CE - 6th cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
birds, eagle-owls Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
capitoline hill Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
cicero Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145
citizenship Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
claudius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
columbaria Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 182
control, sibylline books and Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
cult, mysteries, rituals, public/private Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
decisions, consultation of sibylline books Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
dedications Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
devotion Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
earthquakes Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
elite, senators Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
eloquentia popularis Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145
emotions, prodigy reports and Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
emperor, roman, cult Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
emperor, roman Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
expiation Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
family, slaves Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
floods Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
groups, group formation Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
impiety Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
interpretation, of prodigies Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
jupiter capitolinus/optimus maximus Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
labour market Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 182
livy Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
narratives, prodigies and Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
nurses Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 182
octavian/augustus Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
performance Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145
periodization of prodigy reports, between princeps and senate Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
petronius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
populus Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
praeire Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145
prayer, preces Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
prayer Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 145; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
priesthood, pontifices Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
princeps Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
prodigies, in early principate Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
prodigy reports Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
prostitutes Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 182
religion Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
rhetoric Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
rome, early principate Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
senate/senators' Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
sibylline books Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
slave and free labour Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 182
suetonius Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
tacitus Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164; Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
temples Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
tiber river Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
tiberius Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164
voluntary slavery Tacoma, Models from the Past in Roman Culture: A World of Exempla (2016) 182
vows (vota), pro salute Rüpke and Woolf, Religious Dimensions of the Self in the Second Century CE (2013) 236
zeus alexikakos Eidinow and Driediger-Murphy, Esther Eidinow, Ancient Divination and Experience (2019) 164