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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10496
Strabo, Geography, 9.2.18


nanThis is best shown by the Cephissus, which fills lake Copais; for when the lake had increased so much that Copae was in danger of being swallowed up (Copae is named by the poet, and from it the lake took its name), a rent in the earth, which was formed by the lake near Copae, opened up a subterranean channel about thirty stadia in length and admitted the river; and then the river burst forth to the surface near Larymna in Locris; I mean the Upper Larymna, for there is another Larymna, which I have already mentioned, the Boeotian Larymna on the sea, to which the Romans annexed the Upper Larymna. The place is called Anchoe; and there is also a lake of the same name. And when it leaves this lake the Cephissus at last flows out to the sea. Now at that time, when the flooding of the lake ceased, there was also a cessation of danger to those who lived near it, except in the case of the cities which had already been swallowed up. And though the subterranean channels filled up again, Crates the mining engineer of Chalcis ceased clearing away the obstructions because of party strife among the Boeotians, although, as he himself says in the letter to Alexander, many places had already been drained. Among these places, some writers suppose, was the ancient site of Orchomenus, and others, those of Eleusis and Athens on the Triton River. These cities, it is said, were founded by Cecrops, when he ruled over Boeotia, then called Ogygia, but were later wiped out by inundations. And it is said that a fissure in the earth opened up near Orchomenus, also, and that it admitted the Melas River, which flowed through the territory of Haliartus and formed there the marsh which produces the reed that is used for flutes. But this river has completely disappeared, either because it is dispersed by the fissure into invisible channels or because it is used up beforehand by the marshes and lakes in the neighborhood of Haliartus, from which the poet calls the place grassy, when he says, and grassy Haliartus.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.494-2.510 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.494. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.495. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.496. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.497. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.498. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.499. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.500. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.501. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.502. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.503. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.504. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.505. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.506. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.507. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.508. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.509. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.510. /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty.
2. Homer, Odyssey, 11.582-11.592 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 1.54-1.71 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 3.61.2 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

3.61.2. The origin of our quarrel was this. We settled Plataea some time after the rest of Boeotia, together with other places out of which we had driven the mixed population. The Plataeans not choosing to recognize our supremacy, as had been first arranged, but separating themselves from the rest of the Boeotians, and proving traitors to their nationality, we used compulsion; upon which they went over to the Athenians, and with them did us much harm, for which we retaliated.
5. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 15.293-15.294 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

6. Strabo, Geography, 1.3.17, 8.7.2 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

8.7.2. For the sea was raised by an earthquake and it submerged Helice, and also the sanctuary of the Heliconian Poseidon, whom the Ionians worship even to this day, offering there the Pan-Ionian sacrifices. And, as some suppose, Homer recalls this sacrifice when he says: but he breathed out his spirit and bellowed, as when a dragged bull bellows round the altar of the Heliconian lord. And they infer that the poet lived after the Ionian colonization, since he mentions the Pan-Ionian sacrifice, which the Ionians perform in honor of the Heliconian Poseidon in the country of the Prienians; for the Prienians themselves are also said to be from Helice; and indeed as king for this sacrifice they appoint a Prienian young man to superintend the sacred rites. But still more they base the supposition in question on what the poet says about the bull; for the Ionians believe that they obtain omens in connection with this sacrifice only when the bull bellows while being sacrificed. But the opponents of the supposition apply the above-mentioned inferences concerning the bull and the sacrifice to Helice, on the ground that these were customary there and that the poet was merely comparing the rites that were celebrated there. Helice was submerged by the sea two years before the battle at Leuctra. And Eratosthenes says that he himself saw the place, and that the ferrymen say that there was a bronze Poseidon in the strait, standing erect, holding a hippo-campus in his hand, which was perilous for those who fished with nets. And Heracleides says that the submersion took place by night in his time, and, although the city was twelve stadia distant from the sea, this whole district together with the city was hidden from sight; and two thousand men who had been sent by the Achaeans were unable to recover the dead bodies; and they divided the territory of Helice among the neighbors; and the submersion was the result of the anger of Poseidon, for the Ionians who had been driven out of Helice sent men to ask the inhabitants of Helice particularly for the statue of Poseidon, or, if not that, for a likeness of the sacred object; and when the inhabitants refused to give either, the Ionians sent word to the general council of the Achaeans; but although the assembly voted favorably, yet even so the inhabitants of Helice refused to obey; and the submersion resulted the following winter; but the Achaeans later gave the likeness to the Ionians. Hesiod mentions still another Helice, in Thessaly.
7. Suetonius, Titus, 4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 7.25.9 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7.25.9. The only Burians to survive were those who chanced to be absent at the time, either on active service or for some other reason, and these became the second founders of Bura. There is a temple here of Demeter, one of Aphrodite and Dionysus, and a third of Eileithyia. The images are of Pentelic marble, and were made by Eucleides of Athens . There is drapery for Demeter. This means either that the other images were undraped or that for Demeter raiment was kept in the temple for solemn occasions. Isis too has a sanctuary.
9. Polyaenus, Stratagems, 7.43 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaia (region) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
aegean sea, currents in Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
aeolian islands Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
aeschylus, and social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
akraiphia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
ambracian (ambracius) bay or gulf Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
antirhium Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
antissa Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
apameia in phrygia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
apollo (god) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
apollo pto(i)os, ptoieus, tripods Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
arne (mythical home of boiotians) Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
athena itonia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
atlantis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
black sea, currents of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
boeotia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
bosporus, cimmerian Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
bosporus, thracian Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
bura Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
carice Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
catchment area, of cults, regional Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
cea (ceos, keos) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
cibotus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
copaic basin Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
corinthian gulf Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
dithyramb Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
earth Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
earthquakes Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
eleusis in boeotia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
epinikion, as religious song Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
floods Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
galene Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
galilee, sea of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
gamale Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
helice Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
hellespont Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
identity, general, ethnic Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
immigrant Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
jewish war Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
leucas (leucadia) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
maeotic marsh or lake Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
magnesia near sipylus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
memories, social, and aetiology Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
memories, social, historicity of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
migrations, myths of, boiotia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
migrations, myths of, fostered in ritual practice Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
migrations, myths of, narrative framework for expression of social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
myth, of social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
past, mythical, diverse and contradictory Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
pelasgians, in boiotia Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
peloponnesus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
performances of myth and ritual (also song), embracing social change Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
performances of myth and ritual (also song), web of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
phegium Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
phokis Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
pressures of praise, and thebes Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
propontis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
pyrrha Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
sipylus, mt. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
social change, and myth' Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
tantalis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
tantalos Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
thessalians, migrations of Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
thessalians Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329
thracia (thrace), thracians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
titus (emperor) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
tyndaris Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 90
zeus dodonaios, at dodona Kowalzig, Singing for the Gods: Performances of Myth and Ritual in Archaic and Classical Greece (2007) 329