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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10496
Strabo, Geography, 16.1.18


nanThe Cossaei, like the neighbouring mountaineers, are for the most part archers, and are always out on foraging parties. For as they occupy a country of small extent, and barren, they are compelled by necessity to live at the expense of others. They are also necessarily powerful, for they are all fighting men. When the Elymaei were at war with the Babylonians and Susians, they supplied the Elymaei with thirteen thousand auxiliaries.The Paraetaceni attend to the cultivation of the ground more than the Cossaei, but even these people do not abstain from robbery.The Elymaei occupy a country larger in extent, and more varied, than that of the Paraetaceni. The fertile part of it is inhabited by husbandmen. The mountainous tract is a nursery for soldiers, the greatest part of whom are archers. As it is of considerable extent, it can furnish a great military force; their king, who possesses great power, refuses to be subject, like others, to the king of Parthia. The country was similarly independent in the time of the Persians, and afterwards in the time of the Macedonians, who governed Syria. When Antiochus the Great attempted to plunder the temple of Belus, the neighbouring barbarians, unassisted, attacked and put him to death. In after-times the king of Parthia heard that the temples in their country contained great wealth, but knowing that the people would not submit, and admonished by the fate of Antiochus, he invaded their country with a large army; he took the temple of Minerva, and that of Diana, called Azara, and carried away treasure to the amount of 10,000 talents. Seleuceia also, a large city on the river Hedyphon, was taken. It was formerly called Soloce.There are three convenient entrances into this country; one from Media and the places about the Zagrus, through Massabatice; a second from Susis, through the district Gabiane. Both Gabiane and Massabatice are provinces of Elymaea. A third passage is that from Persis. Corbiane also is a province of Elymais.Sagapeni and Silaceni, small principalities, border upon Elymais.Such, then, is the number and the character of the nations situated above Babylonia towards the east.We have said that Media and Armenia lie to the north, and Adiabene and Mesopotamia to the west of Babylonia.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Herodotus, Histories, 3.70 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.70. Otanes then took aside two Persians of the highest rank whom he thought worthiest of trust, Aspathines and Gobryas, and told them the whole story. These, it would seem, had themselves suspected that it was so; and now they readily believed what Otanes revealed to them. ,They resolved that each should take into his confidence that Persian whom he most trusted; Otanes brought in Intaphrenes, Gobryas brought Megabyzus, and Aspathines Hydarnes. ,When they were six, Darius, whose father, Hystaspes, was a subordinate governor of the Persians, arrived at Susa . When he came, then, the six Persians resolved to include Darius too.
2. Septuagint, 1 Maccabees, 1.21-1.23, 3.27-3.33, 6.1-6.16 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

1.21. He arrogantly entered the sanctuary and took the golden altar, the lampstand for the light, and all its utensils. 1.22. He took also the table for the bread of the Presence, the cups for drink offerings, the bowls, the golden censers, the curtain, the crowns, and the gold decoration on the front of the temple; he stripped it all off. 1.23. He took the silver and the gold, and the costly vessels; he took also the hidden treasures which he found. 3.27. When king Antiochus heard these reports, he was greatly angered; and he sent and gathered all the forces of his kingdom, a very strong army. 3.28. And he opened his coffers and gave a years pay to his forces, and ordered them to be ready for any need. 3.29. Then he saw that the money in the treasury was exhausted, and that the revenues from the country were small because of the dissension and disaster which he had caused in the land by abolishing the laws that had existed from the earliest days. 3.30. He feared that he might not have such funds as he had before for his expenses and for the gifts which he used to give more lavishly than preceding kings. 3.31. He was greatly perplexed in mind, and determined to go to Persia and collect the revenues from those regions and raise a large fund. 3.32. He left Lysias, a distinguished man of royal lineage, in charge of the kings affairs from the river Euphrates to the borders of Egypt. 3.33. Lysias was also to take care of Antiochus his son until he returned. 6.1. King Antiochus was going through the upper provinces when he heard that Elymais in Persia was a city famed for its wealth in silver and gold. 6.2. Its temple was very rich, containing golden shields, breastplates, and weapons left there by Alexander, the son of Philip, the Macedonian king who first reigned over the Greeks. 6.3. So he came and tried to take the city and plunder it, but he could not, because his plan became known to the men of the city 6.4. and they withstood him in battle. So he fled and in great grief departed from there to return to Babylon. 6.5. Then some one came to him in Persia and reported that the armies which had gone into the land of Judah had been routed; 6.6. that Lysias had gone first with a strong force, but had turned and fled before the Jews; that the Jews had grown strong from the arms, supplies, and abundant spoils which they had taken from the armies they had cut down; 6.7. that they had torn down the abomination which he had erected upon the altar in Jerusalem; and that they had surrounded the sanctuary with high walls as before, and also Beth-zur, his city. 6.8. When the king heard this news, he was astounded and badly shaken. He took to his bed and became sick from grief, because things had not turned out for him as he had planned. 6.9. He lay there for many days, because deep grief continually gripped him, and he concluded that he was dying. 6.10. So he called all his friends and said to them, "Sleep departs from my eyes and I am downhearted with worry. 6.11. I said to myself, `To what distress I have come! And into what a great flood I now am plunged! For I was kind and beloved in my power. 6.12. But now I remember the evils I did in Jerusalem. I seized all her vessels of silver and gold; and I sent to destroy the inhabitants of Judah without good reason. 6.13. I know that it is because of this that these evils have come upon me; and behold, I am perishing of deep grief in a strange land. 6.14. Then he called for Philip, one of his friends, and made him ruler over all his kingdom. 6.15. He gave him the crown and his robe and the signet, that he might guide Antiochus his son and bring him up to be king. 6.16. Thus Antiochus the king died there in the one hundred and forty-ninth year.
3. Septuagint, 2 Maccabees, 1.10, 1.20, 1.33, 5.15-5.16, 8.5, 9.1-9.2 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

1.10. Those in Jerusalem and those in Judea and the senate and Judas,To Aristobulus, who is of the family of the anointed priests, teacher of Ptolemy the king, and to the Jews in Egypt,Greeting, and good health.' 1.20. But after many years had passed, when it pleased God, Nehemiah, having been commissioned by the king of Persia, sent the descendants of the priests who had hidden the fire to get it. And when they reported to us that they had not found fire but thick liquid, he ordered them to dip it out and bring it.' 1.33. When this matter became known, and it was reported to the king of the Persians that, in the place where the exiled priests had hidden the fire, the liquid had appeared with which Nehemiah and his associates had burned the materials of the sacrifice,' 5.15. Not content with this, Antiochus dared to enter the most holy temple in all the world, guided by Menelaus, who had become a traitor both to the laws and to his country.' 5.16. He took the holy vessels with his polluted hands, and swept away with profane hands the votive offerings which other kings had made to enhance the glory and honor of the place.' 8.5. As soon as Maccabeus got his army organized, the Gentiles could not withstand him, for the wrath of the Lord had turned to mercy.' 9.1. About that time, as it happened, Antiochus had retreated in disorder from the region of Persia.' 9.2. For he had entered the city called Persepolis, and attempted to rob the temples and control the city. Therefore the people rushed to the rescue with arms, and Antiochus and his men were defeated, with the result that Antiochus was put to flight by the inhabitants and beat a shameful retreat.'
4. Josephus Flavius, Jewish Antiquities, 12.354 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12.354. 1. About this time it was that king Antiochus, as he was going over the upper countries, heard that there was a very rich city in Persia, called Elymais; and therein a very rich temple of Diana, and that it was full of all sorts of donations dedicated to it; as also weapons and breastplates, which, upon inquiry, he found had been left there by Alexander, the son of Philip, king of Macedonia.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander the great, and mesopotamia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
anaїtis (ekbatana) Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
antiochus iii Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
antiochus iv Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
apollo pleurenus Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
artemis, temple of Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 148
artemis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
athena ilias Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
attalus ii Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
axioma Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
babylon, babylonia, babylonians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
bactria Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
barbitace Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
bel at elam Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
benefactions, royal Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
bronze age Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
charax Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
chora, basilike Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
cossiaei Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
daphne Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 148
darius i of persia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
donation of land Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
elam, elamites Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
elymais Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
eulaeus river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
eumenes ii Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
euphrates river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
floods Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
gold Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
ilium Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
italy (italia) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
jerusalem Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
mardi Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
mesopotamia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
mizaei Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
mên axiottenos Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
nearchus of crete Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
nile, underground course of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
numbers, accuracy of' Schwartz, 2 Maccabees (2008) 148
onesicritus of astypalaia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
oxii Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
pasitigris river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
patron deities Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
persia, persians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
persian goddess at hieracome Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
persian gulf or sea Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
persis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
prusias ii Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43
rivers, underground Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
saitae Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
seleucia, on the eulaus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
siltation Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
susa, susiane Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
taurus mtns. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
tigris river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 374
violation of sacred property Dignas, Economy of the Sacred in Hellenistic and Roman Asia Minor (2002) 43