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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10496
Strabo, Geography, 12.8.17


nanCarura forms a boundary between Phrygia and Caria. It is a village; and it has inns, and also fountains of boiling-hot waters, some in the Maeander River and some above its banks. Moreover, it is said that once, when a brothel-keeper had taken lodging in the inns along with a large number of women, an earthquake took place by night, and that he, together with all the women, disappeared from sight. And I might almost say that the whole of the territory in the neighborhood of the Maeander is subject to earthquakes and is undermined with both fire and water as far as the interior; for, beginning at the plains, all these conditions extend through that country to the Charonia, I mean the Charonium at Hierapolis and that at Acharaca in Nysais and that near Magnesia and Myus. In fact, the soil is not only friable and crumbly but is also full of salts and easy to burn out. And perhaps the Maeander is winding for this reason, because the stream often changes its course and, carrying down much silt, adds the silt at different times to different parts of the shore; however, it forcibly thrusts a part of the silt out to the high sea. And, in fact, by its deposits of silt, extending forty stadia, it has made Priene, which in earlier times was on the sea, an inland city.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Appian, The Spanish Wars, 85 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2. Dio Chrysostom, Orations, 35.15 (1st cent. CE - missingth cent. CE)

35.15.  And what is more, the courts are in session every other year in Celaenae, and they bring together an unnumbered throng of people — litigants, jurymen, orators, princes, attendants, slaves, pimps, muleteers, hucksters, harlots, and artisans. Consequently not only can those who have goods to sell obtain the highest prices, but also nothing in the city is out of work, neither the teams nor the houses nor the women.
3. New Testament, Romans, 6.12-6.19 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

6.12. Therefore don't let sin reign in your mortal body, that you should obey it in its lusts. 6.13. Neither present your members to sin as instruments of unrighteousness, but present yourselves to God, as alive from the dead, and your members as instruments of righteousness to God. 6.14. For sin will not have dominion over you. For you are not under law, but under grace. 6.15. What then? Shall we sin, because we are not under law, but under grace? May it never be! 6.16. Don't you know that to whom you present yourselves as servants to obedience, his servants you are whom you obey; whether of sin to death, or of obedience to righteousness? 6.17. But thanks be to God, that, whereas you were bondservants of sin, you became obedient from the heart to that form of teaching whereunto you were delivered. 6.18. Being made free from sin, you became bondservants of righteousness. 6.19. I speak in human terms because of the weakness of your flesh, for as you presented your members as servants to uncleanness and to wickedness upon wickedness, even so now present your members as servants to righteousness for sanctification.
4. Pliny The Elder, Natural History, 2.95.208 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Anon., Acts of John, 59 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59. And having so said, and bidden farewell to them, and left much money with the brethren for distribution, he went forth unto Ephesus, while all the brethren lamented and groaned. And there accompanied him, of Ephesus, both Andronicus and Drusiana and Lycomedes and Cleobius and their families. And there followed him Aristobula also, who had heard that her husband Tertullus had died on the way, and Aristippus with Xenophon, and the harlot that was chaste, and many others, whom he exhorted at all times to cleave to the Lord, and they would no more be parted from him.
6. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 68.27.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

68.27.3.  Hence creatures that fly high enough above it and those that graze at one side are safe. I saw another opening like it at Hierapolis in Asia, and tested it by means of birds; I also bent over it myself and saw the vapour myself. It is enclosed in a sort of cistern and a theatre had been built over it. It destroys all living things save human beings that have been emasculated. The reason for this I cannot understand; I merely relate what I saw as I saw it and what I heard as I heard it.
7. Ammianus Marcellinus, History, 23.6.18 (4th cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

23.6.18. A similar opening was formerly to be seen (as some say) at Hierapolis in Phrygia. And from this also a noxious vapour with a penetrating stench came forth and was destructive to whatever came near it, excepting only eunuchs; and the reason for this may be left to natural philosophers to determine. Cf. Dio. lxviii. 27, 3; Pliny, N.H. ii. 208.
8. Strabo, Geography, 12.3.36, 13.4.14, 14.1.44, 14.1.48

12.3.36. Now Comana is a populous city and is a notable emporium for the people from Armenia; and at the times of the exoduses of the goddess people assemble there from everywhere, from both the cities and the country, men together with women, to attend the festival. And there are certain others, also, who in accordance with a vow are always residing there, performing sacrifices in honor of the goddess. And the inhabitants live in luxury, and all their property is planted with vines; and there is a multitude of women who make gain from their persons, most of whom are dedicated to the goddess, for in a way the city is a lesser Corinth, for there too, on account of the multitude of courtesans, who were sacred to Aphrodite, outsiders resorted in great numbers and kept holiday. And the merchants and soldiers who went there squandered all their money so that the following proverb arose in reference to them: Not for every man is the voyage to Corinth. Such, then, is my account of Comana. 13.4.14. When one crosses over the Mesogis, between the Carians and the territory of Nysa, which latter is a country on the far side of the Maeander extending to Cibyratis and Cabalis, one comes to certain cities. First, near the Mesogis, opposite Laodiceia, to Hierapolis, where are the hot springs and the Plutonion, both of which have something marvellous about them; for the water of the springs so easily congeals and changes into stone that people conduct streams of it through ditches and thus make stone fences consisting of single stones, while the Plutonion, below a small brow of the mountainous country that lies above it, is an opening of only moderate size, large enough to admit a man, but it reaches a considerable depth, and it is enclosed by a quadrilateral handrail, about half a plethrum in circumference, and this space is full of a vapour so misty and dense that one can scarcely see the ground. Now to those who approach the handrail anywhere round the enclosure the air is harmless, since the outside is free from that vapor in calm weather, for the vapor then stays inside the enclosure, but any animal that passes inside meets instant death. At any rate, bulls that are led into it fall and are dragged out dead; and I threw in sparrows and they immediately breathed their last and fell. But the Galli, who are eunuchs, pass inside with such impunity that they even approach the opening, bend over it, and descend into it to a certain depth, though they hold their breath as much as they can (for I could see in their counteces an indication of a kind of suffocating attack, as it were), — whether this immunity belongs to all who are maimed in this way or only to those round the sanctuary, or whether it is because of divine providence, as would be likely in the case of divine obsessions, or whether it is, the result of certain physical powers that are antidotes against the vapor. The changing of water into stone is said also to be the case with the rivers in Laodiceia, although their water is potable. The water at Hierapolis is remarkably adapted also to the dyeing of wool, so that wool dyed with the roots rival those dyed with the coccus or with the marine purple. And the supply of water is so abundant that the city is full of natural baths. 14.1.44. On the road between the Tralleians and Nysa is a village of the Nysaeans, not far from the city Acharaca, where is the Plutonion, with a luxurious grove and a temple of Pluto and Kore, and also the Charonium, a cave that lies above the sacred precinct, by nature wonderful; for they say that those who are diseased and give heed to the cures prescribed by these gods resort thither and live in the village near the cave among experienced priests, who on their behalf sleep in the cave and through dreams prescribe the cures. These are also the men who invoke the healing power of the gods. And they often bring the sick into the cave and leave them there, to remain in quiet, like animals in their lurking-holes, without food for many days. And sometimes the sick give heed also to their own dreams, but still they use those other men, as priests, to initiate them into the mysteries and to counsel them. To all others the place is forbidden and deadly. A festival is celebrated every year at Acharaca; and at that time in particular those who celebrate the festival can see and hear concerning all these things; and at the festival, too, about noon, the boys and young men of the gymnasium, nude and anointed with oil, take up a bull and with haste carry him up into the cave; and, when let loose, the bull goes forward a short distance, falls, and breathes out his life. 14.1.48. Famous men born at Nysa are: Apollonius the Stoic philosopher, best of the disciples of Panaetius; and Menecrates, pupil of Aristarchus; and Aristodemus, his son, whose entire course, in his extreme old age, I in my youth took at Nysa; and Sostratus, the brother of Aristodemus, and another Aristodemus, his cousin, who trained Pompey the Great, proved themselves notable grammarians. But my teacher also taught rhetoric and had two schools, both in Rhodes and in his native land, teaching rhetoric in the morning and grammar in the evening; at Rome, however, when he was in charge of the children of Pompey the Great, he was content with the teaching of grammar.
9. Valerius Maximus, Memorable Deeds And Sayings, 2.7.1



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acts of andrew Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 188
acts of john Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 188
acts of paul Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 188
akaraka charonion and ploutonion,physical remains Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
akaraka charonion and ploutonion Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
amphiaraos,and asklepios Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
amphiaraos,therapeutic incubation Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
antioch (meander) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
apamea (phrygia) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
apamea celaenae McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
aphrodisias Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
apollo lairbenos Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
aristobula (laodicea) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 188
asklepios,and amphiaraos Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
attouda Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
building,building trades Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
caria) McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
caria (also province) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
carina Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
carura Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23, 133
catalog of vices Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
caupona McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 15
caves Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 209
cidramus Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
circuit courts McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
clothing Gorman, Gorman (2014), Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature. 34
colossae Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
colossians (epistle) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
comana (pontus) McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
comissatio McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
confessional inscriptions Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
constitutio antoniniana Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
cornelius scipio aemilianus,p. (general,politician) McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
cult personnel (greek),gallos Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 536
cydrara Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
daedalus Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
damascius (philosopher),exploration beneath hierapolis temple of apollo Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 536
dedicatory objects,anatomical (general) Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
delphic amphictyony McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
dinner parties McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
dio chrysostom Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
divinities (greek and roman),apollo Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 536
divinities (greek and roman),aristomachos (hero-physician) Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
divinities (greek and roman),dis Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 536
divinities (greek and roman),graces Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
divinities (greek and roman),hades/pluto Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295, 536
divinities (greek and roman),kore Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
divinities (greek and roman,of anatolian or eastern origin),cybele/mother of gods Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 536
dreams (in greek and latin literature),damascius,philosophical history Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 536
drusiane (ephesos) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 188
dura-europos McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
dyers Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
earthquakes Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
egypt McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
ephesus Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 188
ganymede Gorman, Gorman (2014), Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature. 34
hierapolis (phrygia),claims of incubation at apollo sanctuary and ploutonion Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 536
hierapolis (phrygia),deadly subterranean vapors Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 536
historiography Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 209
hotels,inns,restaurants,and taverns McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 15
impurity,ritual Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
john (apostle) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 188
kos,shrine of graces and nymphs Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
labrax (pimp in plautus) McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
lairbenos (sanctuary) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
latin language Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 188
m. aurelius ammianos (hierapolis) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
maeander river/valley Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 209
mani Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 188
marble Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
markets,fairs,and festivals McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
meander Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
motella Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
mountains,history Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 209
mountains,science Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 209
mutilation Gorman, Gorman (2014), Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature. 34
oropos amphiareion Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
paul Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
performers McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
phrygia Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
pilgrim psalms Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 188
pimps,in lodgings McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 15
plutarch,lives Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 209
prostitutes,mobility McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
prostitutes Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133, 188
prostitution,historiography McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 15
purity Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
purple dye Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
pythagoreans Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
quarries Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
residential housing McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 15
rhamnous amphiareion,anatomical dedication' Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
rhamnous amphiareion Renberg (2017), Where Dreams May Come: Incubation Sanctuaries in the Greco-Roman World, 295
rituals Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
rivers Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 209
salbacus (baba da˘gı) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
sannio (pimp in terence) McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
sertorius Konig (2022), The Folds of Olympus: Mountains in Ancient Greek and Roman Culture, 209
sexuality Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
stoics Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 133
strabo Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23, 133, 188
technology Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
tekkeköy Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
tertullus / tertyllos (laodicea) Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 188
thecla Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 188
thermal water Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
thermopylae McGinn (2004), The Economy of Prostitution in the Roman world: A study of Social History & The Brothel. 27
thiounta Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
trade Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
trapezopolis Huttner (2013), Early Christianity in the Lycus Valley, 23
wealth/prosperity Gorman, Gorman (2014), Corrupting Luxury in Ancient Greek Literature. 34