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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10496
Strabo, Geography, 10.3.7


nanThe accounts which are more remotely related, however, to the present subject, but are wrongly, on account of the identity of the names, brought into the same connection by the historians — I mean those accounts which, although they are called Curetan History and History of the Curetes, just as if they were the history of those Curetes who lived in Aitolia and Acarnania, not only are different from that history, but are more like the accounts of the Satyri, Sileni, Bacchae, and Tityri; for the Curetes, like these, are called genii or ministers of gods by those who have handed down to us the Cretan and the Phrygian traditions, which are interwoven with certain sacred rites, some mystical, the others connected in part with the rearing of the child Zeus in Crete and in part with the orgies in honor of the Mother of the Gods which are celebrated in Phrygia and in the region of the Trojan Ida. But the variation in these accounts is so small that, whereas some represent the Corybantes, the Cabeiri, the Idaean Dactyli, and the Telchines as identical with the Curetes, others represent them as all kinsmen of one another and differentiate only certain small matters in which they differ in respect to one another; but, roughly speaking and in general, they represent them, one and all, as a kind of inspired people and as subject to Bacchic frenzy, and, in the guise of ministers, as inspiring terror at the celebration of the sacred rites by means of war-dances, accompanied by uproar and noise and cymbals and drums and arms, and also by flute and outcry; and consequently these rites are in a way regarded as having a common relationship, I mean these and those of the Samothracians and those in Lemnos and in several other places, because the divine ministers are called the same. However, every investigation of this kind pertains to theology, and is not foreign to the speculation of the philosopher.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 14.214 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

14.214. /ever should I be called dear by them and worthy of reverence. To her again spake in answer laughter-loving Aphrodite:It may not be that I should say thee nay, nor were it seemly; for thou sleepest in the arms of mightiest Zeus. She spake, and loosed from her bosom the broidered zone
2. Herodotus, Histories, 3.37 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3.37. Cambyses committed many such mad acts against the Persians and his allies; he stayed at Memphis, and there opened ancient coffins and examined the dead bodies. ,Thus too he entered the temple of Hephaestus and jeered at the image there. This image of Hephaestus is most like the Phoenician Pataici, which the Phoenicians carry on the prows of their triremes. I will describe it for anyone who has not seen these figures: it is the likeness of a dwarf. ,Also he entered the temple of the Cabeiri, into which no one may enter save the priest; the images here he even burnt, with bitter mockery. These also are like the images of Hephaestus, and are said to be his sons.
3. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 5.48.4, 5.49.3-5.49.5 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5.48.4.  But Zeus desired that the other of his two sons might also attain to honour, and so he instructed him in the initiatory rite of the mysteries, which had existed on the island since ancient times but was at that time, so to speak, put in his hands; it is not lawful, however, for any but the initiated to hear about the mysteries. 5.49.3.  Thereupon Cybelê, joining herself to the first Olympus, begat Alcê and called the goddess Cybelê after herself; and Corybas gave the name of Corybantes to all who, in celebrating the rites of his mother, acted like men possessed, and married Thebê, the daughter of Cilix. 5.49.4.  In like manner he also transferred the flute from Samothrace to Phrygia and to Lyrnessus the lyre which Hermes gave and which at a later time Achilles took for himself when he sacked that city. To Iasion and Demeter, according to the story the myths relate, was born Plutus or Wealth, but the reference is, as a matter of fact, to the wealth of the corn, which was presented to Iasion because of Demeter's association with him at the time of the wedding of Harmonia. 5.49.5.  Now the details of the initiatory rite are guarded among the matters not to be divulged and are communicated to the initiates alone; but the fame has travelled wide of how these gods appear to mankind and bring unexpected aid to those initiates of theirs who call upon them in the midst of perils.
4. Livy, History, 39.8-39.19 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Contemplative Life, 85, 13 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Then, because of their anxious desire for an immortal and blessed existence, thinking that their mortal life has already come to an end, they leave their possessions to their sons or daughters, or perhaps to other relations, giving them up their inheritance with willing cheerfulness; and those who know no relations give their property to their companions or friends, for it followed of necessity that those who have acquired the wealth which sees, as if ready prepared for them, should be willing to surrender that wealth which is blind to those who themselves also are still blind in their minds.
6. Strabo, Geography, 10.3.10, 10.3.12-10.3.13, 10.3.22 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.3.10. And on this account Plato, and even before his time the Pythagoreians, called philosophy music; and they say that the universe is constituted in accordance with harmony, assuming that every form of music is the work of the gods. And in this sense, also, the Muses are goddesses, and Apollo is leader of the Muses, and poetry as a whole is laudatory of the gods. And by the same course of reasoning they also attribute to music the upbuilding of morals, believing that everything which tends to correct the mind is close to the gods. Now most of the Greeks assigned to Dionysus, Apollo, Hecate, the Muses, and above all to Demeter, everything of an orgiastic or Bacchic or choral nature, as well as the mystic element in initiations; and they give the name Iacchus not only to Dionysus but also to the leader-in-chief of the mysteries, who is the genius of Demeter. And branch-bearing, choral dancing, and initiations are common elements in the worship of these gods. As for the Muses and Apollo, the Muses preside over the choruses, whereas Apollo presides both over these and the rites of divination. But all educated men, and especially the musicians, are ministers of the Muses; and both these and those who have to do with divination are ministers of Apollo; and the initiated and torch-bearers and hierophants, of Demeter; and the Sileni and Satyri and Bacchae, and also the Lenae and Thyiae and Mimallones and Naides and Nymphae and the beings called Tityri, of Dionysus. 10.3.12. But as for the Berecyntes, a tribe of Phrygians, and the Phrygians in general, and those of the Trojans who live round Ida, they too hold Rhea in honor and worship her with orgies, calling her Mother of the Gods and Agdistis and Phrygia the Great Goddess, and also, from the places where she is worshipped, Idaea and Dindymene and Sipylene and Pessinuntis and Cybele and Cybebe. The Greeks use the same name Curetes for the ministers of the goddess, not taking the name, however, from the same mythical story, but regarding them as a different set of Curetes, helpers as it were, analogous to the Satyri; and the same they also call Corybantes. 10.3.13. The poets bear witness to such views as I have suggested. For instance, when Pindar, in the dithyramb which begins with these words,In earlier times there marched the lay of the dithyrambs long drawn out, mentions the hymns sung in honor of Dionysus, both the ancient and the later ones, and then, passing on from these, says,To perform the prelude in thy honor, great Mother, the whirling of cymbals is at hand, and among them, also, the clanging of castanets, and the torch that blazeth beneath the tawny pine-trees, he bears witness to the common relationship between the rites exhibited in the worship of Dionysus among the Greeks and those in the worship of the Mother of the Gods among the Phrygians, for he makes these rites closely akin to one another. And Euripides does likewise, in his Bacchae, citing the Lydian usages at the same time with those of Phrygia, because of their similarity: But ye who left Mt. Tmolus, fortress of Lydia, revel-band of mine, women whom I brought from the land of barbarians as my assistants and travelling companions, uplift the tambourines native to Phrygian cities, inventions of mine and mother Rhea. And again,happy he who, blest man, initiated in the mystic rites, is pure in his life, . . . who, preserving the righteous orgies of the great mother Cybele, and brandishing the thyrsus on high, and wreathed with ivy, doth worship Dionysus. Come, ye Bacchae, come, ye Bacchae, bringing down Bromius, god the child of god, out of the Phrygian mountains into the broad highways of Greece. And again, in the following verses he connects the Cretan usages also with the Phrygian: O thou hiding-bower of the Curetes, and sacred haunts of Crete that gave birth to Zeus, where for me the triple-crested Corybantes in their caverns invented this hide-stretched circlet, and blent its Bacchic revelry with the high-pitched, sweet-sounding breath of Phrygian flutes, and in Rhea's hands placed its resounding noise, to accompany the shouts of the Bacchae, and from Mother Rhea frenzied Satyrs obtained it and joined it to the choral dances of the Trieterides, in whom Dionysus takes delight. And in the Palamedes the Chorus says, Thysa, daughter of Dionysus, who on Ida rejoices with his dear mother in the Iacchic revels of tambourines. 10.3.22. Some writers say that the name Idaean Dactyli was given to the first settlers of the lower slopes of Mt. Ida, for the lower slopes of mountains are called feet, and the summits heads; accordingly, the several extremities of Ida (all of which are sacred to the Mother of the Gods) were called Dactyli. Sophocles thinks that the first male Dactyli were five in number, who were the first to discover and to work iron, as well as many other things which are useful for the purposes of life, and that their sisters were five in number, and that they were called Dactyli from their number. But different writers tell the myth in different ways, joining difficulty to difficulty; and both the names and numbers they use are different; and they name one of them Celmis and others Damnameneus and Heracles and Acmon. Some call them natives of Ida, others settlers; but all agree that iron was first worked by these on Ida; and all have assumed that they were wizards and attendants of the Mother of the Gods, and that they lived in Phrygia about Ida; and they use the term Phrygia for the Troad because, after Troy was sacked, the Phrygians, whose territory bordered on the Troad, got the mastery over it. And they suspect that both the Curetes and the Corybantes were offspring of the Idaean Dactyli; at any rate, the first hundred men born in Crete were called Idaean Dactyli, they say, and as offspring of these were born nine Curetes, and each of these begot ten children who were called Idaean Dactyli.
7. Martial, Epigrams, 10.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. Martial, Epigrams, 10.4 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Statius, Thebais, 2.283-2.284 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

10. Apuleius, Apology, 34 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acarnania Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
achelous river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
actium Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
aetolia, aitolians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
ainos Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 284
alliteration Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
ambracian (ambracius) bay or gulf Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
antonius, m. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
apollo (god) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
apollonius Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 284
argonautica Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 284
artemisia Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
artemita in acarnania Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
assesus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
aulos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
aurelius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
autolykos, bacchantes Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 142
bacchus and bacchic rites Taylor and Hay, Philo of Alexandria: On the Contemplative Life: Introduction, Translation and Commentary (2020) 142
cabiri, rites of Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 7
callimachus, flavian reception of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
callimachus, telchines in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
callimachus, λεπτότης in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
canals, at leukas Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
caria and carians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
cestos Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
cleopatra vii Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
corinth, corinthia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
corinthian gulf Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
corybantic rites Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 7
crete Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
curetes Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
dactyls Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
daktyloi, idaian Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 284
dance (ecstatic) Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 7
death, prayed for, sin worthy of death Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
death, prayed for, voluntary death and rite of dedication Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
dedication, rite of, performed in manner of voluntary death Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
dioryctos Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
echinades islands Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
egypt Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 284
election, isis elects people near end of life Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
euboea Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
furius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
gades (gadir, gadeira), phoenicians and Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
grace, life obtained by Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
great gods (cabeiri) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
herodotus Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 284
initiation, isis urges, and life obtained by grace, ibid. Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
isis, commands of Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
isis, elects people near end of life Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
isis, mistress, sovereign, who commands Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
kingship, of midas Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
kouretians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
kourion mt. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
kyzikos Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 284
leucas (leucadia) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
life, new, through providence of isis Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
life, obtained by grace, and manner of initiation Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
light, threshold of end of Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
locris Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
madness Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 7
magic, kinds of Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 7
mamurianus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
maps Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
martial, and catullus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
martial, and statius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
martial, influence of callimachus on Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
martial, window allusions in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
mercury/hermes, and the sea Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 284
methymna Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 284
midas Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
miletus and milesians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
mother of the gods, and music Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
mother of the gods, and tyranny Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
mother of the gods, and warfare Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
mother of the gods, great Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
mother of the gods, rites of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
music, magical e√ects of Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 7
music, martial Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
music Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
neleus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
neritis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
nicolaus of damascus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
nicopolis, near actium Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
octavian, c. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
oracles Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
pandora Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
phrygia and phrygians, as home of kingship Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
poetical colouring Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
providence, of isis, it causes people to be born again in new life Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
queen, of caria Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
samothrace Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 284
samothracian gods Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
siltation Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192
strabo Miller and Clay, Tracking Hermes, Pursuing Mercury (2019) 284
tools, magical Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 7
tympanum Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
tyranny, and victory and conquest Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
tyranny, theology of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
unio mystica Luck, Arcana mundi: magic and the occult in the Greek and Roman worlds: a collection of ancient texts (2006) 7
venus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
veturius mamurius Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
voluntary death, and rite of dedication' Griffiths, The Isis-Book (Metamorphoses, Book XI) (1975) 280
vulcan Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 368
xerxes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 89
zeus (god) Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 192