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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11455
Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 2.939
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Cicero, On Divination, 1.127 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.127. Praeterea cum fato omnia fiant, id quod alio loco ostendetur, si quis mortalis possit esse, qui conligationem causarum omnium perspiciat animo, nihil eum profecto fallat. Qui enim teneat causas rerum futurarum, idem necesse est omnia teneat, quae futura sint. Quod cum nemo facere nisi deus possit, relinquendum est homini, ut signis quibusdam consequentia declarantibus futura praesentiat. Non enim illa, quae futura sunt, subito exsistunt, sed est quasi rudentis explicatio sic traductio temporis nihil novi efficientis et primum quidque replicantis. Quod et ii vident, quibus naturalis divinatio data est, et ii, quibus cursus rerum observando notatus est. Qui etsi causas ipsas non cernunt, signa tamen causarum et notas cernunt; ad quas adhibita memoria et diligentia et monumentis superiorum efficitur ea divinatio, quae artificiosa dicitur, extorum, fulgorum, ostentorum signorumque caelestium. 1.127. Moreover, since, as will be shown elsewhere, all things happen by Fate, if there were a man whose soul could discern the links that join each cause with every other cause, then surely he would never be mistaken in any prediction he might make. For he who knows the causes of future events necessarily knows what every future event will be. But since such knowledge is possible only to a god, it is left to man to presage the future by means of certain signs which indicate what will follow them. Things which are to be do not suddenly spring into existence, but the evolution of time is like the unwinding of a cable: it creates nothing new and only unfolds each event in its order. This connexion between cause and effect is obvious to two classes of diviners: those who are endowed with natural divination and those who know the course of events by the observation of signs. They may not discern the causes themselves, yet they do discern the signs and tokens of those causes. The careful study and recollection of those signs, aided by the records of former times, has evolved that sort of divination, known as artificial, which is divination by means of entrails, lightnings, portents, and celestial phenomena.
2. Cicero, On Fate, 30, 11 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Plutarch, On Fate, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

574e. But the "indolent argument," that of the "reaper," and that termed "contrary to fate" turn out on this view to be sophisms indeed. The order of points in the Stoic argument According to the opposing argument the chief and first point would appear to be that nothing occurs without cause, and that instead everything occurs in conformity with antecedent causes; the second, that this universe, at one with itself in spirit and in affections, is governed by nature; and in the third place comes what would rather seem to be evidence added to these points in contention: the good repute in which the art of divination is held by all mankind, in the belief that its existence and that of God are in fact involved in one another;
4. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 4.3 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

5. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 2.943, 2.954



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alexander of aphrodisias Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 252
astrology Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 252
calcidius Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 252
causation, and confatalia Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259
causation, on fate Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259
chaldeans Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 252
chrysippus Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 252
determinism, and fatalism Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259
determinism, and predictability Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259
determinism Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259
diogenianus Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 252
divination Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259
fate, and divination Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259
fate/ heimarmene Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 252
fate Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259
freedom, and determinism' Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259
stoics, and determinism Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259
stoics, and fate Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259
stoics, and freedom Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259
stoics, stoicism Frede and Laks, Traditions of Theology: Studies in Hellenistic Theology, its Background and Aftermath (2001) 252
stoics Hankinson, Cause and Explanation in Ancient Greek Thought (1998) 259