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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11455
Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 2.223
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

10 results
1. Plato, Sophist, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

263e. and the several differences between them. Theaet. Give me an opportunity. Str. Well, then, thought and speech are the same; only the former, which is a silent inner conversation of the soul with itself, has been given the special name of thought. Is not that true? Theaet. Certainly. Str. But the stream that flows from the soul in vocal utterance through the mouth has the name of speech? Theaet. True. Str. And in speech we know there is just— Theaet. What? Str. Affirmation and negation Theaet. Yes, we know that.
2. Plato, Theaetetus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

189e. THEAET. Yes, it must; either of both at the same time or in succession. SOC. Excellent. And do you define thought as I do? THEAET. How do you define it? SOC. As the talk which the soul has with itself about any subjects which it considers. You must not suppose that I know this that I am declaring to you. But the soul, as the image presents itself to me, when it thinks, is merely conversing with itself, asking itself questions and answering
3. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

90a. wherefore care must be taken that they have their motions relatively to one another in due proportion. And as regards the most lordly kind of our soul, we must conceive of it in this wise: we declare that God has given to each of us, as his daemon, that kind of soul which is housed in the top of our body and which raises us—seeing that we are not an earthly but a heavenly plant up from earth towards our kindred in the heaven. And herein we speak most truly; for it is by suspending our head and root from that region whence the substance of our soul first came that the Divine Power
4. Cicero, On Fate, 11 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

5. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.36, 7.88 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.36. Lastly, Balbus, I come to your Stoic school. Zeno's view is that the law of nature is divine, and that its function is to command what is right and to forbid the opposite. How he makes out this law to be alive passes our comprehension; yet we undoubtedly expect god to be a living being. In another passage however Zeno declares that the aether is god — if there is any meaning in a god without sensation, a form of deity that never presents itself to us when we offer up our prayers and supplications and make our vows. And in other books again he holds the view that a 'reason' which pervades all nature is possessed of divine power. He likewise attributes the same powers to the stars, or at another time to the years, the months and the seasons. Again, in his interpretation of Hesiod's Theogony (or Origin of the Gods) he does away with the customary and received ideas of the gods altogether, for he does not reckon either Jupiter, Juno or Vesta as gods, or any being that bears a personal name, but teaches that these names have been assigned allegorically to dumb and lifeless things.
6. Plutarch, On Stoic Self-Contradictions, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Seneca The Younger, Letters, 66.7 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.125, 7.195 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.125. Furthermore, the wise man does all things well, just as we say that Ismenias plays all airs on the flute well. Also everything belongs to the wise. For the law, they say, has conferred upon them a perfect right to all things. It is true that certain things are said to belong to the bad, just as what has been dishonestly acquired may be said, in one sense, to belong to the state, in another sense to those who are enjoying it.They hold that the virtues involve one another, and that the possessor of one is the possessor of all, inasmuch as they have common principles, as Chrysippus says in the first book of his work On Virtues, Apollodorus in his Physics according to the Early School, and Hecato in the third book of his treatise On Virtues. 7.195. Second series:On Conclusive Arguments, addressed to Zeno, one book.On the Primary Indemonstrable Syllogisms, addressed to Zeno, one book.On the Analysis of Syllogisms, one book.of Redundant Arguments, addressed to Pasylus, two books.of the Rules for Syllogisms, one book.of Introductory or Elementary Syllogisms, addressed to Zeno, one book.of the Introductory Moods, addressed to Zeno, three books.of the Syllogisms under False Figures, five books.Syllogistic Arguments by Resolution in Indemonstrable Arguments, one book.Inquiries into the Moods: addressed to Zeno and Philomathes, one book. (This appears to be spurious.)Third series:On Variable Arguments, addressed to Athenades, one book. (This also is spurious.)
9. Stobaeus, Anthology, 2.67.13 (5th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

10. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 1.162, 2.52, 2.187, 2.393, 2.954, 2.1008, 3.4



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
abraham, vs. abram Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 223
chodollogomor, chosen father of sound Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 223
chosenness Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 223
chrysippus, on ends Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
chrysippus, on lives Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 31
chrysippus, on the principles of syllogisms, in one book Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 31
chrysippus Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
diogenes laertius Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
etymologies, of abraham and abram Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 223
knowledge (epistēmē), as cognition Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 31
knowledge (epistēmē), as tenor Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 31
migrations of abraham, allegorical interpretation of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 223
migrations of abraham Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 223
parts of philosophy, interrelatedness and knowledge Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 31
parts of philosophy Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 31
plato/platonic/platonism, timaeus Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
reason/rational Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
scholarship, qumran Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
soul; Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
sound, chosen father of Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 223
speech, articulate vs. internal Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 223
stoicism/stoic; Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
the sage, abraham as Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 223
wisdom (sophia), as knowledge of human and divine matters' Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 31
zeno Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
λόγος Birnbaum and Dillon, Philo of Alexandria: On the Life of Abraham: Introduction, Translation, and Commentary (2020) 223