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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11455
Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 2.1116
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 11 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. στέργειν, φιλανθρώπου δὲ παύεσθαι τρόπου. Ἥφαιστος
2. Xenophon, Memoirs, 1.4.8 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.4.8. Do you think you have any wisdom yourself? Oh! Ask me a question and judge from my answer. And do you suppose that wisdom is nowhere else to be found, although you know that you have a mere speck of all the earth in your body and a mere drop of all the water, and that of all the other mighty elements you received, I suppose, just a scrap towards the fashioning of your body? But as for mind, which alone, it seems, is without mass, do you think that you snapped it up by a lucky accident, and that the orderly ranks of all these huge masses, infinite in number, are due, forsooth, to a sort of absurdity?
3. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 2.58 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.58. the nature of the world itself, which encloses and contains all things in its embrace, is styled by Zeno not merely 'craftsmanlike' but actually 'a craftsman,' whose foresight plans out the work to serve its use and purpose in every detail. And as the other natural substances are generated, reared and sustained each by its own seeds, so the world-nature experiences all those motions of the will, those impulses of conation and desire, that the Greeks call hormae, and follows these up with the appropriate actions in the same way as do we ourselves, who experience emotions and sensations. Such being the nature of the world-mind, it can therefore correctly be designated as prudence or providence (for in Greek it is termed pronoia); and this providence is chiefly directed and concentrated upon three objects, namely to secure for the world, first, the structure best fitted for survival; next, absolute completeness; but chiefly, consummate beauty and embellishment of every kind.
4. Lucan, Pharsalia, 7.444-7.455 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

5. Plutarch, On Common Conceptions Against The Stoics, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6. Clement of Alexandria, Christ The Educator, 1.8 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 1.509, 2.528, 2.1107



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
arius dydimus Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
atom Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
balbus Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
benefits, given and received Osborne, Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love (1996) 172
chrysippus Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
cicero Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
cleanthes Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
clement of alexandria Osborne, Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love (1996) 172
demiurge Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
dionysius of alexandria Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
divinity, including philanthropia Osborne, Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love (1996) 172
divinity, of kings and rulers Osborne, Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love (1996) 172
durry, m. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
eusebius of caesarea Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
god and the divine Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
goldschmidt, v. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
grant, r. m. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
lucan Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
middle platonism Osborne, Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love (1996) 172
narducci, e. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
origen Osborne, Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love (1996) 172
philanthropia (love for mankind), in other thinkers Osborne, Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love (1996) 172
plato Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
polis Osborne, Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love (1996) 172
providence Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211; Osborne, Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love (1996) 172
simon, h. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
socrates Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
steen due, o. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
stoicism Osborne, Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love (1996) 172
teleology Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
virtue' Osborne, Eros Unveiled: Plato and the God of Love (1996) 172
xenophon Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211
zeno of citium Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 211