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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11455
Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 2.1076
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

12 results
1. Cicero, On The Ends of Good And Evil, 3.67 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.67. Et Et Sed Mdv. quo modo hominum inter homines iuris esse vincula putant, sic homini nihil iuris esse cum bestiis. praeclare enim Chrysippus, cetera nata esse hominum causa et deorum, eos autem communitatis et societatis suae, ut bestiis homines uti ad utilitatem suam possint possint suam BE sine iniuria. Quoniamque quoniamque quēque R ea natura esset hominis, ut ei ei Lamb. et ABEN om. RV cum genere humano quasi civile ius intercederet, qui id conservaret, eum iustum, qui migraret, migraret negaret A iniustum fore. sed quem ad modum, theatrum cum cum ut E commune sit, recte tamen dici potest eius esse eum locum, quem quisque occuparit, sic in urbe mundove communi non adversatur ius, quo minus suum quidque quodque BE cuiusque sit. 3.67.  "But just as they hold that man is united with man by the bonds of right, so they consider that no right exists as between man and beast. For Chrysippus well said, that all other things were created for the sake of men and gods, but that these exist for their own mutual fellowship and society, so that men can make use of beasts for their own purposes without injustice. And the nature of man, he said, is such, that as it were a code of law subsists between the individual and the human race, so that he who upholds this code will be just and he who departs from it, unjust. But just as, though the theatre is a public place, yet it is correct to say that the particular seat a man has taken belongs to him, so in the state or in the universe, though these are common to all, no principle of justice militates against the possession of private property.
2. Cicero, On Laws, 1.18, 2.11 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.39, 3.49-3.50 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.39. Chrysippus, who is deemed to be the most skilful interpreter of the Stoic dreams, musters an enormous mob of unknown gods — so utterly unknown that even imagination cannot guess at their form and nature, although our mind appears capable of visualizing anything; for he says that divine power resides in reason, and in the soul and mind of the universe; he calls the world itself a god, and also the all‑pervading world-soul, and again the guiding principle of that soul, which operates in the intellect and reason, and the common and all‑embracing nature of things; beside this, the fire that I previously termed aether; and also the power of Fate, and the Necessity that governs future events; and also all fluid and soluble substances, such as water, earth, air, the sun, moon and stars, and the all‑embracing unity of things; and even those human beings who have attained immortality. 3.49. Or if we allow Ino, are we going to make Amphiaraus and Trophonius divine? The Roman tax‑farmers, finding that lands in Boeotia belonging to the immortal gods were exempted by the censor's regulations, used to maintain that nobody was immortal who had once upon a time been a human being. But if these are divine, so undoubtedly is Erechtheus, whose shrine and whose priest also we saw when at Athens. And if we make him out to be divine, what doubts can we feel about Codrus or any other persons who fell fighting for their country's freedom? if we stick at this, we must reject the earlier cases too, from which these follow. 3.50. Also it is easy to see that in most states the memory of brave men has been sanctified with divine honours for the purpose of promoting valour, to make the best men more willing to encounter danger for their country's sake. This is the reason why Erechtheus and his daughters have been deified at Athens, and likewise there is the Leonatic shrine at Athens, which is named Leōcorion. The people of Alabanda indeed worship Alabandus, the founder of that city, more devoutly than any of the famous deities. And it was there that Stratonicus uttered one of his many witty sayings; some person obnoxious to him swore that Alabandus was divine and Hercules was not: 'Well and good,' said Stratonicus; let the wrath of Alabandus fall on me and that of Hercules on you.'
4. Philo of Alexandria, On The Life of Joseph, 29 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

29. for this world is a sort of large state, and has one constitution, and one law, and the word of nature enjoins what one ought to do, and forbids what one ought not to do: but the cities themselves in their several situations are unlimited in number, and enjoy different constitutions, and laws which are not all the same; for there are different customs and established regulations found out and established in different nations;
5. Philo of Alexandria, On The Creation of The World, 73 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

73. of existing things, there are some which partake neither of virtue nor of vice; as for instance, plants and irrational animals; the one, because they are destitute of soul, and are regulated by a nature void of sense; and the other, because they are not endowed with mind of reason. But mind and reason may be looked upon as the abode of virtue and vice; as it is in them that they seem to dwell. Some things again partake of virtue alone, being without any participation in any kind of vice; as for instance, the stars, for they are said to be animals, and animals endowed with intelligence; or I might rather say, the mind of each of them is wholly and entirely virtuous, and unsusceptible of every kind of evil. Some things again are of a mixed nature, like man, who is capable of opposite qualities, of wisdom and folly, of temperance and dissoluteness, of courage and cowardice, of justice and injustice, in short of good and evil, of what is honourable and what is disgraceful, of virtue and vice.
6. Plutarch, On Common Conceptions Against The Stoics, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

7. Plutarch, How A Man May Become Aware of His Progress In Virtue, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

75c. until the opposite condition had been unmistakably engendered, his body having completely recovered its strength. On the contrary, just as in these cases persons make no progress unless their progress is marked by such an abatement of what is oppressing them, that, when the scale turns and they swing upward in the opposite direction, they can note the change, so too, in the study of philosophy, neither progress nor any sense of progress is to be assumed, if the soul does not put aside any of its gross stupidity and purge itself thereof, and if, up to the moment of its attaining the absolute and perfect good, it is wedded to evil which is also absolute. Why if this is so, the wise man in a moment or a second of time
8. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.87-7.88, 7.129 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.87. This is why Zeno was the first (in his treatise On the Nature of Man) to designate as the end life in agreement with nature (or living agreeably to nature), which is the same as a virtuous life, virtue being the goal towards which nature guides us. So too Cleanthes in his treatise On Pleasure, as also Posidonius, and Hecato in his work On Ends. Again, living virtuously is equivalent to living in accordance with experience of the actual course of nature, as Chrysippus says in the first book of his De finibus; for our individual natures are parts of the nature of the whole universe. 7.88. And this is why the end may be defined as life in accordance with nature, or, in other words, in accordance with our own human nature as well as that of the universe, a life in which we refrain from every action forbidden by the law common to all things, that is to say, the right reason which pervades all things, and is identical with this Zeus, lord and ruler of all that is. And this very thing constitutes the virtue of the happy man and the smooth current of life, when all actions promote the harmony of the spirit dwelling in the individual man with the will of him who orders the universe. Diogenes then expressly declares the end to be to act with good reason in the selection of what is natural. Archedemus says the end is to live in the performance of all befitting actions. 7.129. Neither do they think that the divergence of opinion between philosophers is any reason for abandoning the study of philosophy, since at that rate we should have to give up life altogether: so Posidonius in his Exhortations. Chrysippus allows that the ordinary Greek education is serviceable.It is their doctrine that there can be no question of right as between man and the lower animals, because of their unlikeness. Thus Chrysippus in the first book of his treatise On Justice, and Posidonius in the first book of his De officio. Further, they say that the wise man will feel affection for the youths who by their countece show a natural endowment for virtue. So Zeno in his Republic, Chrysippus in book i. of his work On Modes of Life, and Apollodorus in his Ethics.
9. Papyri, P.Hercul.:, 1428

10. Papyrip.Hercul., P.Hercul., 1428

11. Papyrip.Hercul., P.Hercul., 1428

12. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 2.1077, 3.367, 3.371



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, shield of Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 51
allegorical interpretation, of popular religion Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 66
allegorical interpretation, of typhon Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 162
allegorical interpretation, of zeus Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 162
allegorical interpretation, of zeus beating typhon Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 162
battle Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 51
change (metabolē) to wisdom, between opposite states Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 66, 67
change (metabolē) to wisdom, in physics Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 66, 67
change (metabolē) to wisdom Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 66, 67
chrysippus, on gods Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 162
cicero Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 67
decreta Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 199
divine perspective Jedan, Stoic Virtues: Chrysippus and the Religious Character of Stoic Ethics (2009) 199
ecphrasis Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 51
heracles Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 51
odysseus Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 51
philodemus Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 66
plutarch Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 66, 67
poetics Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 51
portion (moira), stoic interpretation of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 162
reason, human Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 67
reason, zeus interpreted as Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 162
sage, as divine Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 66, 67
searching for wisdom, stoics as followers of' Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 162
simile Maciver, Quintus Smyrnaeus' Posthomerica: Engaging Homer in Late Antiquity (2012) 51
typhon, allegorical interpretation of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 162
typhon, and python, variants of a single name Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 162
typhon, stoic interpretation of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 162
zeus Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 66