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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11455
Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 1.162
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Hebrew Bible, Psalms, 136.7 (9th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

136.7. לְעֹשֵׂה אוֹרִים גְּדֹלִים כִּי לְעוֹלָם חַסְדּוֹ׃ 136.7. To Him that made great lights, For His mercy endureth for ever;"
2. Plato, Sophist, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

263e. and the several differences between them. Theaet. Give me an opportunity. Str. Well, then, thought and speech are the same; only the former, which is a silent inner conversation of the soul with itself, has been given the special name of thought. Is not that true? Theaet. Certainly. Str. But the stream that flows from the soul in vocal utterance through the mouth has the name of speech? Theaet. True. Str. And in speech we know there is just— Theaet. What? Str. Affirmation and negation Theaet. Yes, we know that.
3. Plato, Theaetetus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

189e. THEAET. Yes, it must; either of both at the same time or in succession. SOC. Excellent. And do you define thought as I do? THEAET. How do you define it? SOC. As the talk which the soul has with itself about any subjects which it considers. You must not suppose that I know this that I am declaring to you. But the soul, as the image presents itself to me, when it thinks, is merely conversing with itself, asking itself questions and answering
4. Plato, Timaeus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

90a. wherefore care must be taken that they have their motions relatively to one another in due proportion. And as regards the most lordly kind of our soul, we must conceive of it in this wise: we declare that God has given to each of us, as his daemon, that kind of soul which is housed in the top of our body and which raises us—seeing that we are not an earthly but a heavenly plant up from earth towards our kindred in the heaven. And herein we speak most truly; for it is by suspending our head and root from that region whence the substance of our soul first came that the Divine Power
5. Xenophon, Memoirs, 4.6.2-4.6.7 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.6.2. His analysis of Piety — to take that first — was more or less as follows: Tell me, Euthydemus, what sort of thing is Piety, in your opinion? A very excellent thing, to be sure, he replied. Can you say what sort of man is pious? He who worships the gods, I think. May a man worship the gods according to his own will and pleasure? No, there are laws to be observed in worshipping the gods! 4.6.3. Then will not he who knows these laws know how he must worship the gods? I think so. Then does he who knows how he must worship the gods think that he must do so according to his knowledge, and not otherwise? He does indeed. And does everyone worship the gods as he thinks he ought, and not otherwise? I think so. 4.6.4. Then will he who knows what is lawful about the gods worship the gods lawfully? Certainly. Then does not he who worships lawfully worship as he ought? of course. Yes, but he who worships as he ought is pious? Certainly. Shall we therefore rightly define the pious man as one who knows what is lawful concerning the gods? I at any rate think so. 4.6.5. In dealing with men, again, may one do as one chooses? No, in the case of men too there are laws of conduct. Then do not those who observe them in their dealings with one another behave as they ought? of course. And do not they who behave as they ought behave well? Certainly. And do not they who behave well towards men act well in human affairs? Presumably. And do not those who obey the laws do what is just? Certainly. 4.6.6. Do you know what sort of things are called just? The things that the laws command. Consequently those who do what the laws command do both what is just and what they must do? of course. And are not they who do what is just, just men? I think so. Do you think then, that any obey the laws without knowing what the laws command? I do not. And knowing what they must do, do you suppose that any think they must not do it? I don’t think so. Do you know of any who do, not what they think they must do, but something else? I do not. Consequently those who know what is lawful concerning men do what is just? Certainly. But are not they who do what is just, just men? Exactly. At last, then, we may rightly define just men as those who know best what is just concerning men? I think so. And what of Wisdom? 4.6.7. How shall we describe it? Tell me, does it seem to you that the wise are wise about what they know, or are some wise about what they do not know? About what they know, obviously; for how can a man be wise about the things he doesn’t know? The wise, then, are wise by knowledge? How else can a man be wise if not by knowledge? Do you think that wisdom is anything but that by which men are wise? No. It follows that Wisdom is Knowledge? I think so. Then do you think it possible for a man to know all things? of course not — nor even a fraction of them. So an all-wise man is an impossibility? of course, of course. Consequently everyone is wise just in so far as he knows? I think so.
6. Cicero, On The Nature of The Gods, 1.36, 2.78, 7.88 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.36. Lastly, Balbus, I come to your Stoic school. Zeno's view is that the law of nature is divine, and that its function is to command what is right and to forbid the opposite. How he makes out this law to be alive passes our comprehension; yet we undoubtedly expect god to be a living being. In another passage however Zeno declares that the aether is god — if there is any meaning in a god without sensation, a form of deity that never presents itself to us when we offer up our prayers and supplications and make our vows. And in other books again he holds the view that a 'reason' which pervades all nature is possessed of divine power. He likewise attributes the same powers to the stars, or at another time to the years, the months and the seasons. Again, in his interpretation of Hesiod's Theogony (or Origin of the Gods) he does away with the customary and received ideas of the gods altogether, for he does not reckon either Jupiter, Juno or Vesta as gods, or any being that bears a personal name, but teaches that these names have been assigned allegorically to dumb and lifeless things. 2.78. And yet from the fact of the gods' existence (assuming that they exist, as they certainly do) it necessarily follows that they are animate beings, and not only animate but possessed of reason and united together in a sort of social community or fellowship, ruling the one world as a united commonwealth or state.
7. Epictetus, Discourses, 1.1.12 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

8. New Testament, Romans, 1.25 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.25. who exchanged the truth of God for a lie, and worshiped and served the creature rather than the Creator, who is blessed forever. Amen.
9. New Testament, John, 1.1-1.18 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

1.1. In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God. 1.2. The same was in the beginning with God. 1.3. All things were made through him. Without him was not anything made that has been made. 1.4. In him was life, and the life was the light of men. 1.5. The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness hasn't overcome it. 1.6. There came a man, sent from God, whose name was John. 1.7. The same came as a witness, that he might testify about the light, that all might believe through him. 1.8. He was not the light, but was sent that he might testify about the light. 1.9. The true light that enlightens everyone was coming into the world. 1.10. He was in the world, and the world was made through him, and the world didn't recognize him. 1.11. He came to his own, and those who were his own didn't receive him. 1.12. But as many as received him, to them he gave the right to become God's children, to those who believe in his name: 1.13. who were born not of blood, nor of the will of the flesh, nor of the will of man, but of God. 1.14. The Word became flesh, and lived among us. We saw his glory, such glory as of the one and only Son of the Father, full of grace and truth. 1.15. John testified about him. He cried out, saying, "This was he of whom I said, 'He who comes after me has surpassed me, for he was before me.' 1.16. From his fullness we all received grace upon grace. 1.17. For the law was given through Moses. Grace and truth came through Jesus Christ. 1.18. No one has seen God at any time. The one and only Son, who is in the bosom of the Father, he has declared him.
10. Plutarch, Placita Philosophorum (874D-911C), 1.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Seneca The Younger, Natural Questions, 2.45 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

12. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.563, 2.381, 3.183, 4.43 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

13. Clement of Alexandria, Excerpts From Theodotus, 7.3, 19.2, 19.5, 26.1, 32.2, 47.1, 47.3 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

19. 'And the Logos became flesh' not only by becoming man at his Advent [on earth], but also 'at the beginning' the essential Logos became a son by circumscription and not in essence. And again he became flesh when he acted through the prophets. And the Saviour is called an offspring of the essential Logos; therefore, 'in the beginning was the Logos and the Logos was with God' and 'that which came into existence in him was life' and life is the Lord. And when Paul says, 'Put on the new man created according to God' it is as if he said, Believe on him who was 'created' by God, 'according to God,' that is, the Logos in God. And 'created according to God' can refer to the end of advance which man will reach, as does. . . he rejected the end for which he was created. And in other passages he speaks still more plainly and distinctly: 'Who is an image of the invisible God'; then he goes on, 'First-Born of all creation.' For he calls the Logos of the essential Logos 'an image of the invisible God,' but 'First-Born of all creation.' Having been begotten without passion he became the creator and progenitor of all creation and substance, for by him the Father made all things. Wherefore it is also said that he 'received the form of a servant,' which refers not only to his flesh at the advent, but also to his substance, which he derived from its underlying reality, for substance is a slave, inasmuch as it is passive and subordinate to the active and dominating, cause.
14. Clement of Alexandria, Exhortation To The Greeks, 6.67.2 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

15. Clement of Alexandria, Miscellanies, (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

16. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 7.88 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

7.88. And this is why the end may be defined as life in accordance with nature, or, in other words, in accordance with our own human nature as well as that of the universe, a life in which we refrain from every action forbidden by the law common to all things, that is to say, the right reason which pervades all things, and is identical with this Zeus, lord and ruler of all that is. And this very thing constitutes the virtue of the happy man and the smooth current of life, when all actions promote the harmony of the spirit dwelling in the individual man with the will of him who orders the universe. Diogenes then expressly declares the end to be to act with good reason in the selection of what is natural. Archedemus says the end is to live in the performance of all befitting actions.
17. Plotinus, Enneads, (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

18. Cleanthes, Hymn To Zeus, 2

19. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 1.152-1.154, 1.157-1.160, 1.163-1.164, 1.171, 1.175-1.176, 1.497, 1.499, 1.504, 1.509, 1.537, 2.52, 2.187, 2.223, 2.310-2.311, 2.315, 2.1009, 2.1127, 3.4



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
adiáphora Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 25
apostle/apostles, john the apostle Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
archē Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
argonauts Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 101
aristotle Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
balbus Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
belief/s, role in emotion Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 101
christ Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
chrysippus, on ends Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
chrysippus Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207; Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
cicero Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
cleanthes Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 25
contingency in fate Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 101
create, creation, creator Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
demiurge, demiurgic Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
diogenes laertius Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
diogenianus Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 174
ekpyrosis Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 25
epicurus Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
exegesis Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
fear, and hope ( spes ) Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 101
ferguson, j. Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 25
gnostics/gnostic Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
god and the divine Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
incarnation/incarnate Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
islands of the sun Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 25
isnardi–parente, m. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
jupiter, arg. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 101
jupiter, similarities and contradictions Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 101
justice, socrates definition of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 174
koester, g. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
law, as norms and customs of a city Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 174
law, as the force pervading cosmic nature Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 174
law/law Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
law Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
lawful (nomimos) Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 174
logos Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
moreschini, c. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
nous, divine nous Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
philo Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
place Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
plato/platonic/platonism, timaeus Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
providence Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
reale, g. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
reason/rational Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
scholarship, qumran Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
searching for wisdom, stoics as followers of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 174
socrates, on justice Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 174
socrates, on piety Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 174
solmsen, f. Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
soul; Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
stoicism, fate Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 101
stoicism, fate and contingency Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 101
stoicism, providence Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 101
stoicism/stoic; Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
stoicism/stoics viif Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
symbols Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
teleology Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
tertullian Del Lucchese, Monstrosity and Philosophy: Radical Otherness in Greek and Latin Culture (2019) 207
theodotus Černušková, Kovacs and Plátová, Clement’s Biblical Exegesis: Proceedings of the Second Colloquium on Clement of Alexandria (2016) 280
wisdom (sophia), socratic origins of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 174
wisdom (sophia), xenophon' Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 174
zeno, of citium Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 101
zeno Frey and Levison, The Holy Spirit, Inspiration, and the Cultures of Antiquity Multidisciplinary Perspectives (2014) 52
zeno of citium Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 25
ὁμόνοια Pinheiro et al., Philosophy and the Ancient Novel (2015) 25