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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



11455
Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 1.11-1.12
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

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1. Numenius Heracleensis, Fragments, 25 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

2. Cicero, Academica, 1.35 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.35. sed Zeno, cum Arcesilam Archesilaum p 1 w anteiret aetate valdeque subtiliter dissereret et peracute moveretur, corrigere conatus est disciplinam. eam quoque si videtur correctionem explicabo, sicut solebat Antiochus.” Mihi vero inquam videtur, quod vides idem significare Pomponium. VA. 'Zeno igitur nullo modo is erat qui ut Theophrastus nervos neruis p virtutis inciderit, incideret s Lb. -rent n sed contra qui omnia quae que om. s quaecumque Reid ad beatam vitam pertinerent in una virtute poneret nec quicquam aliud numeraret in bonis idque appellaret honestum quod esset simplex quoddam et solum et unum bonum.
3. Diogenes Laertius, Lives of The Philosophers, 2.114, 3.66, 4.33, 4.40, 7.2, 7.4, 7.16, 7.24-7.25, 7.162 (3rd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

2.114. And besides these he won over Phrasidemus the Peripatetic, an accomplished physicist, and Alcimus the rhetorician, the first orator in all Greece; Crates, too, and many others he got into his toils, and, what is more, along with these, he carried off Zeno the Phoenician.He was also an authority on politics.He married a wife, and had a mistress named Nicarete, as Onetor has somewhere stated. He had a profligate daughter, who was married to his friend Simmias of Syracuse. And, as she would not live by rule, some one told Stilpo that she was a disgrace to him. To this he replied, Not so, any more than I am an honour to her. 3.66. the dotted cross (⨰) denotes select passages and beauties of style; the dotted diple (⋗) editors' corrections of the text; the dotted obelus (÷) passages suspected without reason; the dotted antisigma (Ꜿ) repetitions and proposals for transpositions; the ceraunium the philosophical school; the asterisk (∗) an agreement of doctrine; the obelus (−) a spurious passage. So much for the critical marks and his writings in general. As Antigonus of Carystus says in his Life of Zeno, when the writings were first edited with critical marks, their possessors charged a certain fee to anyone who wished to consult them. 4.33. Some represent him as emulous of Pyrrho as well. He was devoted to dialectic and adopted the methods of argument introduced by the Eretrian school. On account of this Ariston said of him:Plato the head of him, Pyrrho the tail, midway Diodorus.And Timon speaks of him thus:Having the lead of Menedemus at his heart, he will run either to that mass of flesh, Pyrrho, or to Diodorus.And a little farther on he introduces him as saying:I shall swim to Pyrrho and to crooked Diodorus.He was highly axiomatic and concise, and in his discourse fond of distinguishing the meaning of terms. He was satirical enough, and outspoken. 4.40. Once indeed, when at Athens, he stopped too long in the Piraeus, discussing themes, out of friendship for Hierocles, and for this he was censured by certain persons. He was very lavish, in short another Aristippus, and he was fond of dining well, but only with those who shared his tastes. He lived openly with Theodete and Phila, the Elean courtesans, and to those who censured him he quoted the maxims of Aristippus. He was also fond of boys and very susceptible. Hence he was accused by Ariston of Chios, the Stoic, and his followers, who called him a corrupter of youth and a shameless teacher of immorality. 7.2. He was a pupil of Crates, as stated above. Next they say he attended the lectures of Stilpo and Xenocrates for ten years – so Timocrates says in his Dion – and Polemo as well. It is stated by Hecato and by Apollonius of Tyre in his first book on Zeno that he consulted the oracle to know what he should do to attain the best life, and that the god's response was that he should take on the complexion of the dead. Whereupon, perceiving what this meant, he studied ancient authors. Now the way he came across Crates was this. He was shipwrecked on a voyage from Phoenicia to Peiraeus with a cargo of purple. He went up into Athens and sat down in a bookseller's shop, being then a man of thirty. 7.4. For a certain space, then, he was instructed by Crates, and when at this time he had written his Republic, some said in jest that he had written it on Cynosura, i.e. on the dog's tail. Besides the Republic he wrote the following works:of Life according to Nature.of Impulse, or Human Nature.of Emotions.of Duty.of Law.of Greek Education.of Vision.of the Whole World.of Signs.Pythagorean Questions.Universals.of Varieties of Style.Homeric Problems, in five books.of the Reading of Poetry.There are also by him:A Handbook of Rhetoric.Solutions.Two books of Refutations.Recollections of Crates.Ethics.This is a list of his writings. But at last he left Crates, and the men above mentioned were his masters for twenty years. Hence he is reported to have said, I made a prosperous voyage when I suffered shipwreck. But others attribute this saying of his to the time when he was under Crates. 7.16. He used to dispute very carefully with Philo the logician and study along with him. Hence Zeno, who was the junior, had as great an admiration for Philo as his master Diodorus. And he had about him certain ragged dirty fellows, as Timon says in these lines:The while he got together a crowd of ignorant serfs, who surpassed all men in beggary and were the emptiest of townsfolk.Zeno himself was sour and of a frowning countece. He was very niggardly too, clinging to meanness unworthy of a Greek, on the plea of economy, If he pitched into anyone he would do it concisely, and not effusively, keeping him rather at arm's length. I mean, for example, his remark upon the fop showing himself off. 7.24. One day at a banquet he was reclining in silence and was asked the reason: whereupon he bade his critic carry word to the king that there was one present who knew how to hold his tongue. Now those who inquired of him were ambassadors from King Ptolemy, and they wanted to know what message they should take back from him to the king. On being asked how he felt about abuse, he replied, As an envoy feels who is dismissed without an answer. Apollonius of Tyre tells us how, when Crates laid hold on him by the cloak to drag him from Stilpo, Zeno said, The right way to seize a philosopher, Crates, is by the ears: persuade me then and drag me off by them; but, if you use violence, my body will be with you, but my mind with Stilpo. 7.25. According to Hippobotus he forgathered with Diodorus, with whom he worked hard at dialectic. And when he was already making progress, he would enter Polemo's school: so far from all self-conceit was he. In consequence Polemo is said to have addressed him thus: You slip in, Zeno, by the garden door – I'm quite aware of it – you filch my doctrines and give them a Phoenician make-up. A dialectician once showed him seven logical forms concerned with the sophism known as The Reaper, and Zeno asked him how much he wanted for them. Being told a hundred drachmas, he promptly paid two hundred: to such lengths would he go in his love of learning. They say too that he first introduced the word Duty and wrote a treatise on the subject. It is said, moreover, that he corrected Hesiod's lines thus:He is best of all men who follows good advice: good too is he who finds out all things for himself. 7.162. After meeting Polemo, says Diocles of Magnesia, while Zeno was suffering from a protracted illness, he recanted his views. The Stoic doctrine to which he attached most importance was the wise man's refusal to hold mere opinions. And against this doctrine Persaeus was contending when he induced one of a pair of twins to deposit a certain sum with Ariston and afterwards got the other to reclaim it. Ariston being thus reduced to perplexity was refuted. He was at variance with Arcesilaus; and one day when he saw an abortion in the shape of a bull with a uterus, he said, Alas, here Arcesilaus has had given into his hand an argument against the evidence of the senses.
4. Eusebius of Caesarea, Preparation For The Gospel, 14.5.11, 14.6.9 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

5. Augustine, Contra Academicos, 2.13, 3.38 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

6. Stoic School, Stoicor. Veter. Fragm., 1.12



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antigonus of carystus, on zeno Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
antipater of tarsus, on the differences between cleanthes and chrysippus Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
apollonius of tyre Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
arcesilaus Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
aristo of chios Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
augustine Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
biography, of zeno Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
cicero, academic scepticism Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
cicero Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
cleanthes, zeno as follower of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
correctio Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
demetrius of magnesia Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
dialectic, studied by zeno and diodorus cronus Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
diodorus cronus, fellow student of zeno Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
diogenes laertius Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141; Bryan, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245; Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
numenius Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
philo of larissa Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
platonists Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
polemo Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
searching for wisdom, stoics as followers of Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
sedley, david Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
stilpo, teacher of zeno Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
stilpo Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
stoics, origins of school Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245
wisdom (sophia), crates the cynic Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
wisdom (sophia), education Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
wisdom (sophia), inspired by socrates Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
wisdom (sophia), on greek education Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
wisdom (sophia), stilpo Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
wisdom (sophia), studying together with diodorus cronus' Brouwer, The Stoic Sage: The Early Stoics on Wisdom, Sagehood and Socrates (2013) 141
zeno of citium, biography Wardy and Warren, Authors and Authorities in Ancient Philosophy (2018) 245