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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10467
Statius, Thebais, 5.28-5.498
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nanThen with drawn sword she commands silence, and prompting us to crime dares thus to speak among us: 'Inspired by heaven and our just anger, O widowed Lemnians — steel now your courage and banish thought of sex! — I make bold to justify a desperate deed. If ye are weary of watching homes for ever desolate, of watching your beauty's flower blight and wither in long barren years of weeping, I have found a way, I promise you — and the Powers are with us! — a way to renew the charm of Love; only take courage equal to your griefs, yea, and of that assure me first. Three winters now have whitened — which of us has known the bonds of wedlock, or the secret honours of the marriage chamber? Whose bosom has glowed with conjugal love? Whom has Lucina beheld in travail? Whose ripening hope throbs in the womb as the due months draw on? Yet such permission is granted to beasts and birds to unite after their manner. Alas! sluggards that we are! Could a Grecian sire give avenging weapons to his daughters, and with treacherous joy drench in blood the bridegroom's careless slumber? And are we then to be but a spiritless mob? Or if ye would have deeds nearer home, lo! let the Thracian wife teach us courage, who with her own hand avenged her union and set the feast before her spouse. Nor do I urge you on, guiltless myself or without care: full is my own house, and huge — ay, look — the struggle. Behold these four together, the pride and comfort of their sire; though they should stay me with embraces and tears, even here in my bosom I will pierce them with the sword, and unite the brothers in one heap of wounds and blood, and set their father's corpse on their yet breathing bodies! Who of you can promise me a spirit for slaughter so great?'
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nanYet more was she urging, when yonder out at sea white sails shone — the Lemnian fleet! Exultant, Polyxo seizes the moment's chance and cries again: 'The gods themselves invite us — do we fail them? See, there are the ships! Heaven, avenging heaven, brings them to meet our wrath, and favours our resolve. Not vain was the vision of my sleep: with naked sword Venus stood over me as I slumbered, plain to my sight, and cried: "Why do ye waste your lives? Go, purge your chambers of the husbands who have lost their love! I myself will light you other torches and join you in worthier unions." She spoke, and laid this sword, this very sword, believe it, on my couch. Take heed then, unhappy ones, whilst there is time to act. Lo! the waters churn and foam beneath the strong arms of the rowers — perchance Thracian brides come with them!'
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nanAt this all are wrought to highest pitch, and a loud clamour rolls upward to the skies. One would think it was Scythia swarming with tumultuous bucklers, when the Father gives rein to armed conflict and flings wide the gates of savage War. Their uproar held no varying voices, nor did dissension cleave into opposing factions, as is the wont of a crowd; one frenzy, one purpose inspires all alike, to lay desolate our homes, to break life's thread for young and old, to crush babes against the teeming breasts, and with the sword make havoc through every age. Then in a green grove — a grove that darkens the ground hard by the lofty hill of Minerva, black itself, but above it the mountain looms huge, and the sunlight perishes in a twofold night — they pledged their solemn word, and thou wast witness, Martian Enyo, and thou, Ceres of the underworld, and the Stygian goddesses came in answer to their prayers; but unseen among them everywhere was Venus, Venus armed, Venus kindling wrath. Unwonted was the blood, for the wife of Charops made offering of her son, and they girded themselves, and at once all greedily stretched forth their right hands and mangled with the sword his marvelling breast, and made common oath in impious joy upon the living blood, while the new ghost hovers about his mother. What horror struck my limbs when I beheld so dire a sight! What colour came upon my cheeks! As when a deer is surrounded by savage wolves, and no strength is left in her tender breast and scanty confidence in speed of foot, she darts away in fearful flight, and each moment believes that she is taken, and hears behind her the snap of baffled jaws.
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nanThey were come, and already the keels grated on the edge of the strand, and they leap ashore in emulous haste. Unhappy they, whom their stark valour 'neath Odrysian Mars destroyed not, nor the rage of the intervening sea! And now they fill with smoke of incense the high shrines of the gods, and drag their promised victims; but murky is the fire on every altar, and in no entrails breathes the god unimpaired. Slowly did Jupiter bring down the night from moist Olympus, and with kindly care held back, I ween, the turning sky, and stayed the fates, nor ever, the sun's course finished, did the new shadows longer delay their coming. Yet at last the late stars shone in heaven, but their light fell on Paros and woody Thasos and the myriad Cyclades: Lemnos alone lies under a heavy sky's thick pall of darkness, gloomy fogs descend upon it and above is a woven belt of night, alone is Lemnos unmarked of wandering mariners. And now, streaming forth from their homes and through the shade of sacred groves, they sate themselves in sumptuous feasting and drain vast golden goblets of the brimming wine, and tell at their leisure of battles on the Strymon, of sweat of war on Rhodope or frozen Haemus. Nay more, their wives, unnatural consorts, recline among the garlands and by the festal tables, each in her choicest raiment; on that last night Cytherea had made their husbands gracious toward them, and given a brief moment of vain bliss after so long a time, and breathed into the doomed ones a passion soon to perish.
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nanThe choirs fell silent, a term is set to banqueting and amorous sport, and as night deepens the noises die away, when Sleep, shrouded in the gloom of his brother Death and dripping with Stygian dew, enfolds the doomed city, and from his relentless horn pours heavy drowse, and marks out the men. Wives and daughters are awake for murder, and joyously do the Sisters sharpen their savage weapons. They fall to their horrid work: in the breast of each her Fury reigns. Not otherwise on Scythian plains are cattle surrounded by Hyrcanian lionesses, whom hunger drives forth at sunrise and greedy cubs implore for their udders' milk. Of a thousand shapes of guilt I hesitate what to tell thee that befell.
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nanBold Gorge stands over her chaplet-crowned Elymus, who on high-piled cushions pants out in his sleep the rising fumes of wine, and probes in his disordered garments for a vital blow, but his ill-omened slumber flees from him at the near approach of death. Confused and half-awake, he seizes his foe in his embrace, and she, as he holds her, straightway stabs through his side from behind, till the point touches her own breast. There at last the crime had ending: his head falls back, but still with quivering eyes and murmur of endearing words he seeks for Gorge, nor losses his arms from her unworthy neck. I will not now tell of the slaughter of the multitude, cruel as it was, but I will recall the woes of my own family: how I beheld thee, fair-haired Cydon, and thee, Crenaeus, with thy unshorn locks streaming o'er thy shoulders — my foster-brothers these, born of another sire — and brave Gyas, my betrothed, of whom I stood in awe, all fallen beneath the blow of bloodthirsty Myrmidone; and how his savage mother pierced Epopeus as he played among the garlands and the couches. Lycaste, her weapon flung away, is weeping over Cydimus, her brother of equal years, gazing alas! upon his doomed body, his face so like her own, the bloom upon his cheeks and that hair which she herself had decked in gold, when her cruel mother, her spouse already slain, stands over her, and threatening drives her to the deed, and thrusts the sword upon her. Like a wild beast, that under a soothing master has unlearnt its madness and is slow to make attack, and in spite of goadings and many a blow refuses to assume its native temper, so she falls upon him as he lies, and sinking down gathers the welling blood in her bosom, and staunches the fresh wounds with her torn tresses.
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nanBut when I beheld Alcimede carry her father's head still murmuring and his bloodless sword, my hair stood erect and fierce shuddering horror swept through my frame; that was my Thoas, methought, and that my own dread hand! Straightway in agony I rush to my father's chamber. He indeed long while had pondered — what sleep for him whose charge is great? — although our spacious home lay apart from the city, what was the uproar, what the noises of the night, why the hours of rest were clamorous. I tell a confused story of the crime, what was their grievance, whence their passionate wrath. 'No force can stop their frenzy; follow this way, unhappy one; they are pursuing, and will be on us if we linger, and perchance we shall fall together.' Alarmed by my words he sprang up from the couch. We hurry through devious paths of the vast city, and, shrouded in a covering of mist, everywhere behold great heaps of nocturnal carnage, wheresoe'er throughout the sacred groves the cruel darkness had laid them low. Here could one see faces pressed down upon the couches, and the sword-hilts projecting from breasts laid open, broken fragments of great spears and bodies with raiment gashed and torn, mixing-bowls upset and banquets floating in gore, and mingled wine and blood streaming back like a torrent to the goblets from gaping throats. Here are a band of youths, and there old men whom no violence should profane, and children half-slain flung o'er the faces of their moaning parents and gasping our their trembling souls on the threshold of life. No fiercer are the banquet-revellings of the Lapithae on frozen Ossa, when the cloud-born ones grow hot with wine deep-drained; scarce has wrath's first pallor seized them, when overthrowing their tables they start up to the affray.
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nanThen first Thyoneus beneath night's cover revealed himself to us in our distress, succouring his son Thoas in his hour of need, and shone in a sudden blaze of light. I knew him: yet he had bound no chaplets round his swelling temples, nor yellow grapes about his hair: but a cloud was upon him, and his eyes streamed angry rain as he addressed us: 'While the fates granted thee, my son, to keep Lemnos mighty and feared still by foreign peoples, never failed I to aid thy righteous labours; the stern Parcae have cut short the relentless threads, nor have my prayers and tears, poured forth in vain supplication before Jove, availed to turn away this woe; to his daughter hath he granted honour unspeakable. Hasten ye then your flight, and thou, O maiden, worthy offspring of my race, guide thy sire this way where the wall's twin arms approach the sea; at yonder gate, where thou thinkest all is quiet, stands Venus in fell mood and aids the furious ones; — whence hath the goddess this violence, this heart of Mars? Trust thou thy father to the broad deep: I will take thy cares upon me.'
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nanThe Lemnian sighed, and, stayed by shamefast tears awhile, then makes reply: "Deep are the wounds, O prince, thou biddest me revive, the tale of Lemnos and its Furies and of murder done even in the bed's embrace, and of the shameful sword whereby our manhood perished; ah! the wickedness comes back upon me, the freezing Horror grips my heart! Ah! miserable they, upon whom this frenzy came! alas, that night! alas, my father! for I am she — lest haply ye feel shame for your kindly host — I am she, O chieftains, who alone did steal away and hide her father. But why do I weave the long prelude to my woes? Moreover battle summons you and your hearts' high enterprise. Thus much doth it suffice to tell: I am Hypsipyle, born of renowned Thoas, and captive thrall to your Lycurgus.
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nanSo speaking he faded into air again, and since the shadows barred our vision lit up our road with a long stream of fire, in kindly succour. I follow where the signal leads, and anon entrust my sire, hidden in a vessel's curving beams, to the gods of the sea and the winds and Aegaeon who holds the Cyclades in his embrace; nor set we any limit to our mutual grief, were it not that Lucifer is already chasing the stars from the eastern pole. Then at last I leave the sounding shore, in brooding fear and scarce trusting Lyaeus' word, resolute in step but casting anxious thoughts behind me; nor rest I but must fain watch from every hill the breezes rising in heaven and the ocean waves.
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nanDay rises shamefast, and Titan opening heaven to view turns aside his beams from Lemnos and hides his averted chariot behind the barrier of a cloud. Night's frenzied deeds lay manifest, and to all the new terrors of the day brought sudden shame, though all had share therin; they bury in the earth their impious crimes or burn with hurried fires. And now the Fury band and Venus sated to the full had fled the stricken city; now could the women know what they had dared, now rend their hair and bedew their eyes with tears. This island blest in lands and wealth, in arms and heroes, famed for its site and enriched of late by a Getic triumph, ahs lost, not by onslaught of the sea or of the foe or by stroke of heaven, all her folk together, bereft and ravaged to the uttermost. No men are left to plough the fields or cleave the waves, silent are the homes, swimming deep in blood and stained red with clotted gore: we alone remain in that great city, we and the ghosts that fiercely hiss about our rooftops. I, too, in the inner courtyard of my house build high a flaming pile and cast thereon my father's sceptre and arms and well-known royal raiment, and sadly do I stand by the blazing welter of the pyre with blood-stained sword, and lament the feigned deed and empty funeral in fear, should they perchance accuse me, and pray that the omen may be void of harm towards my sire and that so my doubting fears of death may come to naught.
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nanFor these deserts — since the ruse of my pretended crime wins credence — the throne and kingdom of my father are given me — punishment indeed! Was I do deny their urgent pressure? I submitted, having oft called heaven to witness my innocence and to give protection; I succeed — ah! ghastly sovereignty — to power's pale image and to a Lemnos sad without its chief. And now ever more and more do they writhe in wakeful anguish, now openly lament, and little by little grow to hate Polyxo; now is it permitted to remember the crime, and to set altars to the dead and adjure with many prayers their buried ashes. Even so when the frightened heifers behold in horror their leader and sire of the stall, to whom belonged the pastures and the glory of the grown herd, lying mangled beneath the Massylian foe, leaderless and dejected goes the herd, and the very fields and rivers with the mute cattle mourn the monarch slain.
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nanBut lo! dividing the waters with brazen prow the Pelian pinewood bark draws nigh, stranger to that wide unadventured sea: the Minyae are here crew; the twofold splashing wave runs white along her towering sides: one would think Ortygia moved uprooted or a sundered mountain sailed upon the deep. But when the oars stayed poised in air and the waters fell silent, there came from the vessel's midst a voice sweeter than dying swans or quill of Phoebus, and the seas themselves drew night the ship. Thereafter did we learn 'twas Orpheus, son of Oeagrus, who leaning against the mast sang thus amid the rowers and bade them know such toils no more. Towards Scythian Boreas were they voyaging and the mouth of the unattempted sea that the Cyanean rocks hold fast. We at the sight of them deemed them Thracian foes, and ran to our homes in wild confusion like crowding cattle or fluttering birds. Alas! where now is our frenzied rage? We man the harbour and the shore-embracing walls, which give a far view over the open sea, and the lofty towers; hither in excited haste they bring stones and stakes and the arms that mourn their lords, and swords stained with slaughters; nay, it shames them not to don stiff woven corselets and to fit helms about their wanton faces; Pallas blushed and marvelled at their bold array, and Gradivus laughed on the far slopes of Haemus. Then first did our headlong madness leave our minds, nor seemed it a mere ship on the salt sea, but the gods' late-coming justice and vengeance for our crimes that drew nigh o'er the deep.
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nanAnd already were they distant from the land the range of a Gortynian shaft, when Jupiter brought a cloud laden with dark rain and set it over the very rigging of the Pelasgian ship; then the waters shudder, all its light is stolen from the sun and the gloom thickens, and the wave straightway takes the colour of the gloom; warring winds tear the hollow clouds and rend the deep, the wet sand surges up in the black eddies, and the whole sea hangs poised between the conflict of the winds, and with arching ridge now all but touching the stars falls shattered; nor has the bewildered vessel its former motion, but pitches to and fro, with the Triton on its bows now projecting from the waters' depths, now borne aloft in air. Nor aught avails the might of the heroes half-divine, but the demented mast makes the vessel rock and sway, and falling forward with overbalancing weight smites upon the arching waves, and the oars drop fruitlessly on the rowers' chests.
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nanWe, too, from rocks and every walled rampart, while they thus toil and rage against he seas and the southern blasts, with weak arms shower down wavering missiles — what deed did we not dare? — on Telamon and Peleus, and even on the Tirynthian we bend our bow. But they, hard pressed both by storm and foe, fortify, some of them, the ship with shields, others bale water from the hold; others fight, but the motion makes their bodies helpless, and there is no force behind their reeling blows. We hurl our darts more fiercely, and the iron rain vies with the tempest, and enormous stakes and fragments of millstones and javelins and missiles trailing tresses of flame fall now into the sea, now on the vessel: the decking of the bark resounds and the beams groan as the gaping holes are torn. Even so does Jupiter lash the green fields with Hyperboreans snow; beasts of all kinds perish on the plains, and birds are overtaken and fall dead, and the harvest is blasted with untimely frost; then is there thundering on the heights, and fury in the rivers. But when from on high Jove flung his brand with shock of cloud on cloud, and the flash revealed the mariners' mighty forms, our hearts were frozen fast, our arms dropped shuddering and let fall the unnatural weapons, and our true sex once more held sway.
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nanWe behold the sons of Aeacus, and Ancaeus threatening mightily our walls, and Iphitus with long spear warding off the rocks; clear to view among the desperate band the son of Amphitryon outtops them all, and alternately on either hand weighs down the ship and burns to leap into the midst of the waves. But Jason — not yet did I know him to my cost — leaping nimbly over benches and oars and treading the backs of heroes, calls now on great Oenides, now on Idas and Talaus, now on the son of Tyndareus dripping with the white spume of the sea, and Calais driving aloft in the clouds of his frosty sire to fasten the sails to the mast, and with voice and gesture again and again encourages them. With vigorous strokes they lash the sea and shake the walls, but none the more do the foaming waters yield, and the flung spears rebound from our towers. Tiphys himself wearies by his labours the heavy billows and the tiller that will not hear him, and pale with anxiety oft changes his commands, and turns right- and leftward from the land the prow that would fain dash itself to shipwreck on the rocks, until from the vessel's tapering bows the son of Aeson holds forth the olive-branch of Pallas hat Mopsus bore, and through the tumult of his comrades would prevent him, asks for peace; his words were swept away by the headlong gale.
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nanClose heed they gave her then, and nobler she seemed and worthy of honour, and equal to such a deed; then all craved to learn her story, and father Adrastus foremost urged her: "Ay, verily, while we set in long array the columns of our van — nor does Nemea readily allow a broad host to draw clear, so closely hemmed is she by woodland and entangling shade — tell us of the crime, and of thy praiseworthy deed and the sufferings of thy people, and how cast out from thy realm thou art come to this toil of thine.
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nanThen came there a truce to arms, and the tempest likewise sank to rest, and day looked forth once more from the turbid heaven. Then those fifty heroes, their vessels duly moored, as they leap from the sheer height shake the stranger shores, tail comely sons of glorious sires, serene of brow and known by their bearings, now that the swelling rage has left their countenances. Even so the denizens of heaven are said to burst forth from their mystic portals, when they desire to visit the homes and the coast and the lesser banquet of the red Aethiopians: rivers and mountains yield them passage, Earth exults beneath their footsteps and Atlas knows a brief respite from the burden of the sky.
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nanHere we behold Theseus, lately come in triumph from setting Marathon free, and the Ismarian brethren, pledges of the North Wind's love, with red wing-feathers whirring loud on either temple; here, too, Admetus, whom Phoebus was content to serve, and Orpheus, in nought resembling barbarous Thrace; then Calydon's offspring and the son-in-law of watery Nereus. The twin Oebalidae bewilder our vision with puzzling error: each wears a bright red mantle and wields a spear, bare on the shoulders of each and their faces unbearded, their locks are aglow with the same starry radiance. Young Hylas bravely marching follows great Hercules stride for stride, scarce equalling his pace, slow though he bear his mighty bulk, and rejoices to carry the Lernaean arms and to sweat beneath the huge quiver.
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nanSo once more Venus and Love try with their secret fires the fierce hearts of the Lemnian women. Then royal Juno instils into their minds the image of the heroes' arms and raiment, and their signs of noble race, and all fling open their doors in emulous welcome to the strangers. Then first were fires lit on the altars, and unspeakable cares were forgotten, then came feasting and happy sleep and tranquil nights, nor without heaven's will, I ween, did they find favour, when they confessed their crime. My fault, too, my fated pardonable fault, perchance ye would hear, O chieftains: by the ashes and avenging furies of my people I swear, innocent and unwilling did I light the torch of alien wedlock — as Heaven's Providence doth know — though Jason be wily to ensnare young maidens' hearts: laws of its own bind blood-stained Phasis, and you, ye Colchians, breed far different passions. And now the skies have broken through the bonds of frost and grow war in the long sunlit days and the swift year has wheeled round to the opposite pole. A new progeny is brought to birth in answer to our prayers, and Lemnos is filled with the cries of babes unhoped-for. I myself also bear twin sons, memorial of a ravished couch, and, made a mother by my rough guest, renew in the babe his grandsire's name; nor may I know what fortune hath befallen since I left them, for now full twenty years are past, if the fates but suffer them to live and Lycaste reared them as I prayed her.
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nanThe boisterous seas fell tranquil and a milder southern breeze invites the sails: the ship herself, hating to tarry in the quiet haven, strains with her hawsers at the resisting rock. Then would the Minyae fain begone, and cruel Jason summons his comrades — would he had ere that sailed past my shores, who recked not of his own children, nor of his sworn word; truly his fame is known in distant lands: the fleece of seafaring Phrixus hath returned. When the destined sun had sunk beneath the sea and Tiphys felt the coming breeze and Phoebus' western couch blushed red, once more alas! there was lamentation, once more the last night of all. Scarce is the day begun, and already Jason high upon the poop gives the word for sailing, and strikes as chieftain the first oar-stroke on the sea. From rocks and mountain height we follow them with our gaze as they cleave the foamy space of outspread ocean, until the light wearied our roaming vision and seemed to interweave the distant waters with the sky, and made the sea one with heaven's extremest marge.
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nanPleasant is it to the unhappy to speak, and to recall the sorrows of old time. Thus she begins: "Set amid the encircling tides of Aegean Nereus lies Lemnos, where Mulciber draws breath again from his labours in fiery Aetna; Athos hard by clothes the land with his mighty shadow, and darkens the sea with the image of his forests; opposite the Thracians plough, the Thracians, from whose shores came our sin and doom. Rich and populous was our land, no less renowned than Samos or echoing Delos or the other countless isles against which Aegon dashes in foam. It was the will of the gods to confound our homes, but our own hearts are not free from guilt; no sacred fires did we kindle to Venus, the goddess had no shrine. Even celestial minds are moved at last to resentment, and slow but sure the Avenging Powers creep on.
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nanA rumour goes about the harbour that Thoas has been carried o'er the deep and is reigning in his brother's isle of Chios, that I am innocent and the funeral pyre a mockery; the impious mob clamours loud, maddened by the stings of guilt, and demands the crime I owe them. Moreover, secret murmurings arise and increase among the folk: 'Is she alone faithful to her kindred, while we rejoiced to slay? Did not heaven and fate ordain the deed? why then bears she rule in the city, the accursed one?' Aghast at such words — for a cruel retribution draws nigh, nor does queenly pomp delight me — I wander alone in secret on the winding shore and leave the deadly walls by the road of my father's flight, well known to me; but not a second time did Euhan meet me, for a band of pirates putting in to shore carried me speechless away and brought me to your land a slave.
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nanShe, leaving ancient Paphos and her hundred shrines, with altered looks and tresses, loosed, so they say, her love-alluring girdle and banished her Idalian doves afar. Some, 'tis certain, of the women told it abroad that the goddess, armed with other torches and deadlier weapons, had flitted through the marriage chambers in the darkness of midnight with the sisterhood of Tartarus about her, and how she had filled every secret place with twining serpents and our bridal thresholds with dire terror, pitying not the people of her faithful spouse. Straightway fled ye from Lemnos, ye tender Loves: Hymen fell mute and turned his torch to earth; chill neglect came o'er the lawful couch, no nightly return of joy was there, no slumber in the beloved embrace, everywhere reigned bitter Hatred and Frenzy and Discord sundering the partners of the bed. For the men were bent on overthrowing the boastful Thracians across the strait, and warring down the savage tribe. And in despite of home and their children standing on the shore, sweeter it was to them to bear Edonian winters and the brunt of the cold North, or, when at last still night followed a day of battle, to hear the sudden onburst of the crashing mountain torrent. But the women — for I at that time was sheltered by care-free maidenhood and tender years — sad and sick at heart sought tearful solace in converse day and night, or gazed out across the sea to cruel Thrace.
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nanThe sun in the midst of his labours was poising his shining chariot on Olympus' height, as though at halt; four times came thunder from a serene sky, four times did the smoky caverns of the god open their panting summits, and Aegon, thought the winds were hushed, was stirred and flung a mighty sea against the shores: when suddenly the crone Polyxo is caught up in a dire frenzy, and deserting unwontedly her chamber flies abroad. Like a Teumesian Thyiad rapt to madness by the god, when the sacred rites are calling and the boxwood pipe of Ida stirs her blood, and the voice of Euhan is heard upon the high hills: even so with head erect and quivering bloodshot eyes she ranges up and down the lonely city wildly clamouring, and beating at closed doors and thresholds summons us to council; her children clinging to her bear her woeful company. No less eagerly do all the women burst from their houses and rush to the citadel of Pallas on the hill-top: hither in feverish haste we press and crowd disorderly.
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Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.297-6.311 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.297. /and shone like a star, and lay undermost of all. Then she went her way, and the throng of aged wives hastened after her. 6.298. /and shone like a star, and lay undermost of all. Then she went her way, and the throng of aged wives hastened after her. 6.299. /and shone like a star, and lay undermost of all. Then she went her way, and the throng of aged wives hastened after her. Now when they were come to the temple of Athene in the citadel, the doors were opened for them by fair-cheeked Theano, daughter of Cisseus, the wife of Antenor, tamer of horses; 6.300. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.301. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.302. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.303. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.304. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.305. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.306. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.307. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.308. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.309. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.310. /on Troy and the Trojans' wives and their little children. So spake she praying, but Pallas Athene denied the prayer.Thus were these praying to the daughter of great Zeus, but Hector went his way to the palace of Alexander, the fair palace that himself had builded with the men 6.311. /on Troy and the Trojans' wives and their little children. So spake she praying, but Pallas Athene denied the prayer.Thus were these praying to the daughter of great Zeus, but Hector went his way to the palace of Alexander, the fair palace that himself had builded with the men
2. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.609-1.638, 3.1026-3.1051, 3.1191-3.1224, 4.1049-4.1052 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.609. ἔνθʼ ἄμυδις πᾶς δῆμος ὑπερβασίῃσι γυναικῶν 1.610. νηλειῶς δέδμητο παροιχομένῳ λυκάβαντι. 1.611. δὴ γὰρ κουριδίας μὲν ἀπηνήναντο γυναῖκας 1.612. ἀνέρες ἐχθήραντες, ἔχον δʼ ἐπὶ ληιάδεσσιν 1.613. τρηχὺν ἔρον, ἃς αὐτοὶ ἀγίνεον ἀντιπέρηθεν 1.614. Θρηικίην δῃοῦντες· ἐπεὶ χόλος αἰνὸς ὄπαζεν 1.615. Κύπιδος, οὕνεκά μιν γεράων ἐπὶ δηρὸν ἄτισσαν. 1.616. ὦ μέλεαι, ζήλοιό τʼ ἐπισμυγερῶς ἀκόρητοι. 1.617. οὐκ οἶον σὺν τῇσιν ἑοὺς ἔρραισαν ἀκοίτας 1.618. ἀμφʼ εὐνῇ, πᾶν δʼ ἄρσεν ὁμοῦ γένος, ὥς κεν ὀπίσσω 1.619. μήτινα λευγαλέοιο φόνου τίσειαν ἀμοιβήν. 1.620. οἴη δʼ ἐκ πασέων γεραροῦ περιφείσατο πατρὸς 1.621. Ὑψιπύλεια Θόαντος, ὃ δὴ κατὰ δῆμον ἄνασσεν· 1.622. λάρνακι δʼ ἐν κοίλῃ μιν ὕπερθʼ ἁλὸς ἧκε φέρεσθαι 1.623. αἴ κε φύγῃ. καὶ τὸν μὲν ἐς Οἰνοίην ἐρύσαντο 1.624. πρόσθεν, ἀτὰρ Σίκινόν γε μεθύστερον αὐδηθεῖσαν 1.625. νῆσον, ἐπακτῆρες, Σικίνου ἄπο, τόν ῥα Θόαντι 1.626. νηιὰς Οἰνοίη νύμφη τέκεν εὐνηθεῖσα. 1.627. τῇσι δὲ βουκόλιαί τε βοῶν χάλκειά τε δύνειν 1.628. τεύχεα, πυροφόρους τε διατμήξασθαι ἀροὔρας 1.629. ῥηίτερον πάσῃσιν Ἀθηναίης πέλεν ἔργων 1.630. οἷς αἰεὶ τὸ πάροιθεν ὁμίλεον. ἀλλὰ γὰρ ἔμπης 1.631. ἦ θαμὰ δὴ πάπταινον ἐπὶ πλατὺν ὄμμασι πόντον 1.632. δείματι λευγαλέῳ, ὁπότε Θρήικες ἴασιν. 1.633. τῶ καὶ ὅτʼ ἐγγύθι νήσου ἐρεσσομένην ἴδον Ἀργώ 1.634. αὐτίκα πασσυδίῃ πυλέων ἔκτοσθε Μυρίνης 1.635. δήια τεύχεα δῦσαι ἐς αἰγιαλὸν προχέοντο 1.636. Θυιάσιν ὠμοβόροις ἴκελαι· φὰν γάρ που ἱκάνειν 1.637. Θρήικας· ἡ δʼ ἅμα τῇσι Θοαντιὰς Ὑψιπύλεια 1.638. δῦνʼ ἐνὶ τεύχεσι πατρός. ἀμηχανίῃ δʼ ἐχέοντο 3.1026. ‘φράζεο νῦν, ὥς κέν τοι ἐγὼ μητίσομʼ ἀρωγήν. 3.1027. εὖτʼ ἂν δὴ μετιόντι πατὴρ ἐμὸς ἐγγυαλίξῃ 3.1028. ἐξ ὄφιος γενύων ὀλοοὺς σπείρασθαι ὀδόντας 3.1029. δὴ τότε μέσσην νύκτα διαμμοιρηδὰ φυλάξας 3.1030. ἀκαμάτοιο ῥοῇσι λοεσσάμενος ποταμοῖο 3.1031. οἶος ἄνευθʼ ἄλλων ἐνὶ φάρεσι κυανέοισιν 3.1032. βόθρον ὀρύξασθαι περιηγέα· τῷ δʼ ἔνι θῆλυν 3.1033. ἀρνειὸν σφάζειν, καὶ ἀδαίετον ὠμοθετῆσαι 3.1034. αὐτῷ πυρκαϊὴν εὖ νηήσας ἐπὶ βόθρῳ. 3.1035. μουνογενῆ δʼ Ἑκάτην Περσηίδα μειλίσσοιο 3.1036. λείβων ἐκ δέπαος σιμβλήια ἔργα μελισσέων. 3.1037. ἔνθα δʼ ἐπεί κε θεὰν μεμνημένος ἱλάσσηαι 3.1038. ἂψ ἀπὸ πυρκαϊῆς ἀναχάζεο· μηδέ σε δοῦπος 3.1039. ἠὲ ποδῶν ὄρσῃσι μεταστρεφθῆναι ὀπίσσω 3.1040. ἠὲ κυνῶν ὑλακή, μή πως τὰ ἕκαστα κολούσας 3.1041. οὐδʼ αὐτὸς κατὰ κόσμον ἑοῖς ἑτάροισι πελάσσῃς. 3.1042. ἦρι δὲ μυδήνας τόδε φάρμακον, ἠύτʼ ἀλοιφῇ 3.1043. γυμνωθεὶς φαίδρυνε τεὸν δέμας· ἐν δέ οἱ ἀλκὴ 3.1044. ἔσσετʼ ἀπειρεσίη μέγα τε σθένος, οὐδέ κε φαίης 3.1045. ἀνδράσιν, ἀλλὰ θεοῖσιν ἰσαζέμεν ἀθανάτοισιν. 3.1046. πρὸς δὲ καὶ αὐτῷ δουρὶ σάκος πεπαλαγμένον ἔστω 3.1047. καὶ ξίφος. ἔνθʼ οὐκ ἄν σε διατμήξειαν ἀκωκαὶ 3.1048. γηγενέων ἀνδρῶν, οὐδʼ ἄσχετος ἀίσσουσα 3.1049. φλὸξ ὀλοῶν ταύρων. τοῖός γε μὲν οὐκ ἐπὶ δηρὸν 3.1050. ἔσσεαι, ἀλλʼ αὐτῆμαρ· ὅμως σύγε μή ποτʼ ἀέθλου 3.1051. χάζεο. καὶ δέ τοι ἄλλο παρὲξ ὑποθήσομʼ ὄνειαρ. 3.1191. ἠέλιος μὲν ἄπωθεν ἐρεμνὴν δύετο γαῖαν 3.1192. ἑσπέριος, νεάτας ὑπὲρ ἄκριας Αἰθιοπήων· 3.1193. νὺξ δʼ ἵπποισιν ἔβαλλεν ἔπι ζυγά· τοὶ δὲ χαμεύνας 3.1194. ἔντυον ἥρωες παρὰ πείσμασιν. αὐτὰρ Ἰήσων 3.1195. αὐτίκʼ ἐπεί ῥʼ Ἑλίκης εὐφεγγέος ἀστέρες Ἄρκτου 3.1196. ἔκλιθεν, οὐρανόθεν δὲ πανεύκηλος γένετʼ αἰθήρ 3.1197. βῆ ῥʼ ἐς ἐρημαίην, κλωπήιος ἠύτε τις φώρ 3.1198. σὺν πᾶσιν χρήεσσι· πρὸ γάρ τʼ ἀλέγυνεν ἕκαστα 3.1199. ἠμάτιος· θῆλυν μὲν ὄιν, γάλα τʼ ἔκτοθι ποίμνης 3.1200. Ἄργος ἰὼν ἤνεικε· τὰ δʼ ἐξ αὐτῆς ἕλε νηός. 3.1201. ἀλλʼ ὅτε δὴ ἴδε χῶρον, ὅτις πάτου ἔκτοθεν ἦεν 3.1202. ἀνθρώπων, καθαρῇσιν ὑπεύδιος εἱαμενῇσιν 3.1203. ἔνθʼ ἤτοι πάμπρωτα λοέσσατο μὲν ποταμοῖο 3.1204. εὐαγέως θείοιο τέρεν δέμας· ἀμφὶ δὲ φᾶρος 3.1205. ἕσσατο κυάνεον, τό ῥά οἱ πάρος ἐγγυάλιξεν 3.1206. Λημνιὰς Ὑψιπύλη, ἀδινῆς μνημήιον εὐνῆς. 3.1207. πήχυιον δʼ ἄρʼ ἔπειτα πέδῳ ἔνι βόθρον ὀρύξας 3.1208. νήησε σχίζας, ἐπὶ δʼ ἀρνειοῦ τάμε λαιμόν 3.1209. αὐτόν τʼ εὖ καθύπερθε τανύσσατο· δαῖε δὲ φιτρους 3.1210. πῦρ ὑπένερθεν ἱείς, ἐπὶ δὲ μιγάδας χέε λοιβάς 3.1211. Βριμὼ κικλήσκων Ἑκάτην ἐπαρωγὸν ἀέθλων. 3.1212. καί ῥʼ ὁ μὲν ἀγκαλέσας πάλιν ἔστιχεν· ἡ δʼ ἀίουσα 3.1213. κευθμῶν ἐξ ὑπάτων δεινὴ θεὸς ἀντεβόλησεν 3.1214. ἱροῖς Αἰσονίδαο· πέριξ δέ μιν ἐστεφάνωντο 3.1215. σμερδαλέοι δρυΐνοισι μετὰ πτόρθοισι δράκοντες. 3.1216. στράπτε δʼ ἀπειρέσιον δαΐδων σέλας· ἀμφὶ δὲ τήνγε 3.1217. ὀξείῃ ὑλακῇ χθόνιοι κύνες ἐφθέγγοντο. 3.1218. πίσεα δʼ ἔτρεμε πάντα κατὰ στίβον· αἱ δʼ ὀλόλυξαν 3.1219. νύμφαι ἑλειονόμοι ποταμηίδες, αἳ περὶ κείνην 3.1220. Φάσιδος εἱαμενὴν Ἀμαραντίου εἱλίσσονται. 3.1221. Αἰσονίδην δʼ ἤτοι μὲν ἕλεν δέος, ἀλλά μιν οὐδʼ ὧς 3.1222. ἐντροπαλιζόμενον πόδες ἔκφερον, ὄφρʼ ἑτάροισιν 3.1223. μίκτο κιών· ἤδη δὲ φόως νιφόεντος ὕπερθεν 3.1224. Καυκάσου ἠριγενὴς Ἠὼς βάλεν ἀντέλλουσα. 4.1049. δερκόμενοι τείνουσαν ἀμήχανον· ἀλλά κε πᾶσιν 4.1050. κῶας ἑλεῖν μεμαῶτες, ἐμίξατε δούρατα Κόλχοις 4.1051. αὐτῷ τʼ Αἰήτῃ ὑπερήνορι· νῦν δʼ ἐλάθεσθε 4.1052. ἠνορέης, ὅτε μοῦνοι ἀποτμηγέντες ἔασιν.’
3. Strabo, Geography, 8.6.7 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4. Vergil, Aeneis, 2.50-2.54, 2.237-2.238, 2.258-2.259, 11.477-11.482, 11.484 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.50. or underneath it thrust a kindling flame 2.51. or pierce the hollow ambush of its womb 2.52. with probing spear. Yet did the multitude 2.54. Then from the citadel, conspicuous 2.237. and favoring Pallas all her grace withdrew. 2.238. No dubious sign she gave. Scarce had they set 2.258. that they should build a thing of monstrous size 2.259. of jointed beams, and rear it heavenward 11.477. fling thy poor countrymen in danger's way 11.478. O chief and fountain of all Latium 's pain? 11.479. War will not save us. Not a voice but sues 11.480. for peace, O Turnus! and, not less than peace 11.481. its one inviolable pledge. Behold 11.482. I lead in this petition! even I 11.484. denying)—look! I supplicate of thee
5. Vergil, Georgics, 4.315-4.386, 4.388, 4.418-4.419, 4.523-4.527, 4.538-4.547 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

4.315. Or cut the empty wax away? for oft 4.316. Into their comb the newt has gnawed unseen 4.317. And the light-loathing beetles crammed their bed 4.318. And he that sits at others' board to feast 4.319. The do-naught drone; or 'gainst the unequal foe 4.320. Swoops the fierce hornet, or the moth's fell tribe; 4.321. Or spider, victim of Minerva's spite 4.322. Athwart the doorway hangs her swaying net. 4.323. The more impoverished they, the keenlier all 4.324. To mend the fallen fortunes of their race 4.325. Will nerve them, fill the cells up, tier on tier 4.326. And weave their granaries from the rifled flowers. 4.327. Now, seeing that life doth even to bee-folk bring 4.328. Our human chances, if in dire disease 4.329. Their bodies' strength should languish—which anon 4.330. By no uncertain tokens may be told— 4.331. Forthwith the sick change hue; grim leanness mar 4.332. Their visage; then from out the cells they bear 4.333. Forms reft of light, and lead the mournful pomp; 4.334. Or foot to foot about the porch they hang 4.335. Or within closed doors loiter, listless all 4.336. From famine, and benumbed with shrivelling cold. 4.337. Then is a deep note heard, a long-drawn hum 4.338. As when the chill South through the forests sighs 4.339. As when the troubled ocean hoarsely boom 4.340. With back-swung billow, as ravening tide of fire 4.341. Surges, shut fast within the furnace-walls. 4.342. Then do I bid burn scented galbanum 4.343. And, honey-streams through reeden troughs instilled 4.344. Challenge and cheer their flagging appetite 4.345. To taste the well-known food; and it shall boot 4.346. To mix therewith the savour bruised from gall 4.347. And rose-leaves dried, or must to thickness boiled 4.348. By a fierce fire, or juice of raisin-grape 4.349. From Psithian vine, and with its bitter smell 4.350. Centaury, and the famed Cecropian thyme. 4.351. There is a meadow-flower by country folk 4.352. Hight star-wort; 'tis a plant not far to seek; 4.353. For from one sod an ample growth it rears 4.354. Itself all golden, but girt with plenteous leaves 4.355. Where glory of purple shines through violet gloom. 4.356. With chaplets woven hereof full oft are decked 4.357. Heaven's altars: harsh its taste upon the tongue; 4.358. Shepherds in vales smooth-shorn of nibbling flock 4.359. By placeName key= 4.360. The roots of this, well seethed in fragrant wine 4.361. Set in brimmed baskets at their doors for food. 4.362. But if one's whole stock fail him at a stroke 4.363. Nor hath he whence to breed the race anew 4.364. 'Tis time the wondrous secret to disclose 4.365. Taught by the swain of Arcady, even how 4.366. The blood of slaughtered bullocks oft has borne 4.367. Bees from corruption. I will trace me back 4.368. To its prime source the story's tangled thread 4.369. And thence unravel. For where thy happy folk 4.370. Canopus , city of Pellaean fame 4.371. Dwell by the placeName key= 4.372. And high o'er furrows they have called their own 4.373. Skim in their painted wherries; where, hard by 4.374. The quivered Persian presses, and that flood 4.375. Which from the swart-skinned Aethiop bears him down 4.376. Swift-parted into sevenfold branching mouth 4.377. With black mud fattens and makes Aegypt green 4.378. That whole domain its welfare's hope secure 4.379. Rests on this art alone. And first is chosen 4.380. A strait recess, cramped closer to this end 4.381. Which next with narrow roof of tiles atop 4.382. 'Twixt prisoning walls they pinch, and add hereto 4.383. From the four winds four slanting window-slits. 4.384. Then seek they from the herd a steer, whose horn 4.385. With two years' growth are curling, and stop fast 4.386. Plunge madly as he may, the panting mouth 4.388. Batter his flesh to pulp i' the hide yet whole 4.418. Lo! even the crown of this poor mortal life 4.419. Which all my skilful care by field and fold 4.523. The fetters, or in showery drops anon 4.524. Dissolve and vanish. But the more he shift 4.525. His endless transformations, thou, my son 4.526. More straitlier clench the clinging bands, until 4.527. His body's shape return to that thou sawest 4.538. Behind a rock's huge barrier, Proteus hides. 4.539. Here in close covert out of the sun's eye 4.540. The youth she places, and herself the while 4.541. Swathed in a shadowy mist stands far aloof. 4.542. And now the ravening dog-star that burns up 4.543. The thirsty Indians blazed in heaven; his course 4.544. The fiery sun had half devoured: the blade 4.545. Were parched, and the void streams with droughty jaw 4.546. Baked to their mud-beds by the scorching ray 4.547. When Proteus seeking his accustomed cave
6. Statius, Thebais, 4.724, 4.747, 5.1-5.16, 5.23, 5.28-5.99, 5.101-5.498, 5.632 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

7. Valerius Flaccus Gaius, Argonautica, 1.1-1.5, 2.1-2.427, 2.497-2.550, 3.81-3.82, 3.300-3.301, 3.306-3.308, 3.581-3.593, 4.89 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeneas Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 160, 164; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 413
amata Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 165
amazons Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
amphiaraus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186
apollonius rhodius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
argo Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 330
argos Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186
bacchic rites, conflation with wedding and burial rites Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 162
bacchic rites, dido in vergils aeneid as bacchant Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 160
bacchic rites, in vergils aeneid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 160
bacchic rites, negation of marriage and domesticity in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 161, 162, 166
bacchus/dionysus Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 163, 164
bacchus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186
bona dea and hercules, transvestism and cross-dressing in ephebic rituals Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 162, 163
burials and mourning, bacchic rites conflated with Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 162
burials and mourning, hypsipyles fake burial of thoas in statius thebaid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159, 160, 161, 162, 163
circe Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
civil war Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
colchis Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
collective action, female Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 165, 166
conflations of womens rites Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 162
corinth Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
cyzicus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
dido Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 160, 164, 165
digression Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 413
divine epiphany, bacchus appearing to hypsipyle, in statius thebaid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 163, 164
doliones Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
dryope Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
ephebic rituals Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 162, 163
error Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 413
euripides Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 330
eurydice, mother of opheltes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186
feminization/effeminacy Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 163
hercules Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
hesione Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
hispala (faecenia hispala) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
hylas Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
hypsipyle, as female exemplum of pietas Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 163, 164, 165
hypsipyle, as narrator of her own story (in statius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159, 164
hypsipyle, as victimized other Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 165
hypsipyle, bacchus appearing to (in statius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 163, 164
hypsipyle, fake burial of thoas (in statius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159, 160, 161, 162, 163
hypsipyle, feminization/ ephebization of thoas Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 162, 163
hypsipyle, hiding of thoas in bacchic temple (in valerius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 159
hypsipyle, hispala in livys bacchanalian narrative and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
hypsipyle, in apollonius argonautica Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 159, 162
hypsipyle, in euripides hypsipyle Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 159, 163
hypsipyle, in statius thebaid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166
hypsipyle, in valerius argonautica Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 159, 165, 166
hypsipyle, jason/argonauts and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 159, 162
hypsipyle, lemnian womens massacre of men Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 161, 162
hypsipyle, positive treatment of female agency of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 165, 166
hypsipyle, purification rite and escape of thoas to tauris (in valerius) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159
hypsipyle, ritual contexts for Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 165, 166
hypsipyle, sons of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186
hypsipyle, vergils aeneid and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 159, 160, 161, 163, 164
hypsipyle Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 330; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166; Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 413
intertextuality, hypsipyle story and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 159, 160, 162, 163, 164, 165
jason Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186
jason and the argonauts Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 159, 162
juno/hera Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 160
juno (see also hera) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
jupiter Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 163, 165
lemnian maenads Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 161, 162
lemnos Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186; Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 330
livys bacchanalian narrative, hypsipyle compared to hispala in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
lycurgus, king of nemea Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186
magical ritual Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 160, 161, 164
mars Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
medea Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
nemea Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186
opheltes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186; Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 159
orpheus Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 330
pallas (deity) Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 162
pelias Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
pietas Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 163, 164, 165
polyxo Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 161, 162
ritual corruption/perversion/distortion Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 160
rivers Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 413
snake Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 413
statius, and euripides Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186
statius, thebaid, hypsipyle in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, 165, 166
statius, thebaid, vergils aeneid and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147
statius Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118, 330
supplication , of lemnian women in statius thebaid Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 162
thebes Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 413
thoas, father of hypsipyle Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 186
tragedy Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 330
transvestism and cross-dressing, in ephebic rituals Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 162, 163
troy Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
venus/aphrodite Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 160, 163, 165
venus (see also aphrodite) Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
vergil, aeneid, bacchic rites in Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148, 160
vergil, aeneid, hypsipyle story, valerius and statius versions of Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147, 148, 159, 160, 161, 163, 164
vergil, aeneid, statius and Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 147
vulcan Heerking and Manuwald, Brill’s Companion to Valerius Flaccus (2014) 118
wandering Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 413
water Skempis and Ziogas, Geography, Topography, Landscape: Configurations of Space in Greek and Roman Epic (2014) 413
weddings and marriage, bacchic negation of marriage and domesticity Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 161, 162, 166
womens rituals and agency in roman literature, collective action, female' Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 148
womens rituals and agency in roman literature, collective action, female Panoussi, Brides, Mourners, Bacchae: Women's Rituals in Roman Literature (2019) 165, 166