Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10416
Sophocles, Women Of Trachis, 1222-1248


nanYou know her. Just this is the command that I impose upon you, my son: when I am dead, if you wish to show your piety by remembrance of your oath to your father, make this woman your wife and do not disobey your father.


nanYou know her. Just this is the command that I impose upon you, my son: when I am dead, if you wish to show your piety by remembrance of your oath to your father, make this woman your wife and do not disobey your father.


nanYou know her. Just this is the command that I impose upon you, my son: when I am dead, if you wish to show your piety by remembrance of your oath to your father, make this woman your wife and do not disobey your father.


nanLet no other but you take her who has lain close at my side. You, my son, make that marriage-bond your own. Obey; for although you were obedient in great affairs, your disobedience in small ones cancels the gratitude already won. Hyllus:


nanLet no other but you take her who has lain close at my side. You, my son, make that marriage-bond your own. Obey; for although you were obedient in great affairs, your disobedience in small ones cancels the gratitude already won. Hyllus:


nanLet no other but you take her who has lain close at my side. You, my son, make that marriage-bond your own. Obey; for although you were obedient in great affairs, your disobedience in small ones cancels the gratitude already won. Hyllus:


nanLet no other but you take her who has lain close at my side. You, my son, make that marriage-bond your own. Obey; for although you were obedient in great affairs, your disobedience in small ones cancels the gratitude already won. Hyllus:


nanLet no other but you take her who has lain close at my side. You, my son, make that marriage-bond your own. Obey; for although you were obedient in great affairs, your disobedience in small ones cancels the gratitude already won. Hyllus:


nanAh, me, it is wrong to be angry with a sick man, but who could bear to see him have thoughts like these? Heracles:


nanAh, me, it is wrong to be angry with a sick man, but who could bear to see him have thoughts like these? Heracles:


nanYour words show no willingness to do as I say. Hyllus:


nanWho on earth would, when she alone is to blame for my mother’s death, and for your present condition besides?


nanWho on earth would, when she alone is to blame for my mother’s death, and for your present condition besides?


nanWho would choose to do so, unless he were infected by avenging fiends? It would be better, Father, that I also die, rather than live united with those whom I most detest! Heracles:


nanWho would choose to do so, unless he were infected by avenging fiends? It would be better, Father, that I also die, rather than live united with those whom I most detest! Heracles:


nanWho would choose to do so, unless he were infected by avenging fiends? It would be better, Father, that I also die, rather than live united with those whom I most detest! Heracles:


nanThe man will render no due respect, it seems, to my dying prayer. No, be sure that the curse of the gods


nanThe man will render no due respect, it seems, to my dying prayer. No, be sure that the curse of the gods


nanwill await you for disobeying my commands. Hyllus:


nanAh, you will soon show, it seems, how diseased you are! Heracles:


nanYes, for you stir me from my slumbering plague. Hyllus:


nanI am miserable! I have no way out of so many dilemmas! Heracles:


nanYes, since you think it wrong to obey your begetter. Hyllus:


nanBut must I then learn to be unholy, Father? Heracles:


nanIt is not unholy, if you gladden my heart. Hyllus:


nanDo you, then, command me to do this as a clear duty? Heracles:


nanI do, and I call on the gods to bear me witness! Hyllus:


nanHERACLES: I command thee,- the gods bear me witness! HYLLUS: Then will I do it, and refuse not,- calling upon the gods to witness thy deed. I can never be condemned for loyalty to thee, my father. HERACLES: Thou endest well; and to these words, my son, quickly add the gracious deed, that thou mayest lay me on the pyre before any pain returns to rend or sting me. Come, make haste and lift me! This, in truth, is rest from troubles; this is the end, the last end, of Heracles! HYLLUS: Nothing, indeed, hinders the fulfilment of thy wish, since thy command constrains us, my father. HERACLES (chanting) Come, then, ere thou arouse this plague, O my stubborn soul, give me a curb as of steel on lips set like stone to stone, and let no cry escape them; seeing that the deed which thou art to do, though done perforce, is yet worthy of thy joy! HYLLUS (chanting) Lift him, followers! And grant me full forgiveness for this; but mark the great cruelty of the gods in the deeds that are being done. They beget children, they are hailed as fathers, and yet they can look upon such sufferings. (The attendants raise HERACLES: on the litter and move slowly off, as HYLLUS chants to the CHORUS in the closing lines.) No man foresees the future; but the present is fraught with mourning for us, and with shame for the powers above, and verily with anguish beyond compare for him who endures this doom. Maidens, come ye also, nor linger at the house; ye who have lately seen a dread death, with sorrows manifold and strange: and in all this there is nought but Zeus.END


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

19 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.257-2.264, 3.245-3.301, 5.212-5.216, 19.175-19.177, 19.196-19.197, 19.242-19.268 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.257. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.258. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.259. /for that the Danaan warriors give him gifts full many; whereas thou pratest on with railings. But I will speak out to thee, and this word shall verily be brought to pass: if I find thee again playing the fool, even as now thou dost, then may the head of Odysseus abide no more upon his shoulders 2.260. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.261. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.262. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.263. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 2.264. /nor may I any more be called the father of Telemachus, if I take thee not, and strip off thy raiment, thy cloak, and thy tunic that cover thy nakedness, and for thyself send thee wailing to the swift ships, beaten forth from the place of gathering with shameful blows. 3.245. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.246. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.247. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.248. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.249. /Meanwhile the heralds were bearing through the city the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, two lambs and, in a goat-skin bottle, wine that maketh glad the heart, the fruit of the earth. And the herald Idaeus bare a shining bowl and golden cups; and he came to the old king's side and roused him, saying: 3.250. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.251. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.252. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.253. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.254. / Rise, thou son of Laomedon, the chieftains of the horse-taming Trojans, and of the brazen-coated Achaeans, summon thee to go down into the plain, that ye may swear oaths of faith with sacrifice. But Alexander and Menelaus, dear to Ares, will do battle with long spears for the woman's sake; 3.255. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.256. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.257. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.258. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.259. /and whichsoever of the twain shall conquer, him let woman and treasure follow; and we others, swearing friendship and oaths of faith with sacrifice, should then dwell in deep-soiled Troy, but they will depart to Argos, pastureland of horses, and Achaea, the land of fair women. So spake he, and the old man shuddered, yet bade his companions 3.260. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. 3.261. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. 3.262. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. 3.263. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. 3.264. /yoke the horses; and they speedily obeyed. Then Priam mounted and drew back the reins, and by his side Antenor mounted the beauteous car; and the twain drave the swift horses through the Scaean gates to the plain. But when they were now come to the Trojans and Achaeans 3.265. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.266. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.267. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.268. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.269. /they stepped forth from the chariot upon the bounteous earth, and went into the midst of the Trojans and Achaeans. Straightway then rose up Agamemnon, king of men, and Odysseus of many wiles, and the lordly heralds brought together the offerings for the holy oaths of the gods, and mixed the wine in the bowl 3.270. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.271. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.272. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.273. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.274. /and poured water over the hands of the kings. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut hair from off the heads of the lambs; and the heralds portioned it out to the chieftans of the Trojans and Achaeans. 3.275. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.276. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.277. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.278. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.279. /Then in their midst Agamemnon lifted up his hands and prayed aloud:Father Zeus, that rulest from Ida, most glorious, most great, and thou Sun, that beholdest all things and hearest all things, and ye rivers and thou earth, and ye that in the world below take vengeance on men that are done with life, whosoever hath sworn a false oath; 3.280. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.281. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.282. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.283. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.284. /be ye witnesses, and watch over the oaths of faith. If Alexander slay Menelaus, then let him keep Helen and all her treasure; and we will depart in our seafaring ships. But if so be fair-haired Menelaus shall slay Alexander 3.285. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.286. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.287. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.288. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.289. /then let the Trojans give back Helen and all her treasure, and pay to the Argives in requital such recompense as beseemeth, even such as shall abide in the minds of men that are yet to be. Howbeit, if Priam and the sons of Priam be not minded to pay recompense unto me, when Alexander falleth 3.290. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.291. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.292. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.293. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.294. /then will I fight on even thereafter, to get me recompense, and will abide here until I find an end of war. He spake, and cut the lambs' throats with the pitiless bronze; and laid them down upon the ground gasping and failing of breath, for the bronze had robbed them of their strength. 3.295. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.296. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.297. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.298. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.299. /Then they drew wine from the bowl into the cups, and poured it forth, and made prayer to the gods that are for ever. And thus would one of the Achaeans and Trojans say:Zeus, most glorious, most great, and ye other immortal gods, which host soever of the twain shall be first to work harm in defiance of the oaths 3.300. /may their brains be thus poured forth upon the ground even as this wine, theirs and their children's; and may their wives be made slaves to others. 3.301. /may their brains be thus poured forth upon the ground even as this wine, theirs and their children's; and may their wives be made slaves to others. 5.212. /on that day when I led my Trojans to lovely Ilios to do pleasure to Hector. But if so be I shall return and behold with mine eyes my native land and my wife and great, high-roofed palace, then may some alien forthwith cut my head from me 5.213. /on that day when I led my Trojans to lovely Ilios to do pleasure to Hector. But if so be I shall return and behold with mine eyes my native land and my wife and great, high-roofed palace, then may some alien forthwith cut my head from me 5.214. /on that day when I led my Trojans to lovely Ilios to do pleasure to Hector. But if so be I shall return and behold with mine eyes my native land and my wife and great, high-roofed palace, then may some alien forthwith cut my head from me 5.215. /if I break not this bow with my hands and cast it into the blazing fire; for worthless as wind doth it attend me. To him then spake in answer Aeneas, leader of the Trojans:Nay, speak not thus; things shall in no wise be any better before that we twain with horses and chariot 5.216. /if I break not this bow with my hands and cast it into the blazing fire; for worthless as wind doth it attend me. To him then spake in answer Aeneas, leader of the Trojans:Nay, speak not thus; things shall in no wise be any better before that we twain with horses and chariot 19.175. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.176. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.177. /and swear to thee an oath, that never hath he gone up into the woman's bed neither had dalliance with her, as is the appointed way, O king, of men and of women; and let the heart in thine own breast be open to appeasement. Thereafter let him make amends to thee in his hut with a feast full rich 19.196. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.197. /even all that we promised yesternight to give Achilles, and bring the women withal. And let Talthybius forthwith make me ready a boar in the midst of the wide camp of the Achaeans, to sacrifice to Zeus and to the Sun. But swift-footed Achilles answered him, and said:Most glorious son of Atreus, Agamemnon, king of men 19.242. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.243. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.244. /son of Creon, and Melanippus; and they went their way to the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus. Then straightway in the one moment was the word said, and the deed fulfilled. Seven tripods bare they from the hut, even as he promised him, and twenty gleaming cauldrons and twelve horses; 19.245. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.246. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.247. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.248. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.249. /and forth they speedily led women skilled in goodly handiwork; seven they were, and the eighth was fair-cheeked Briseis. Then Odysseus weighed out ten talents of gold in all, and led the way and with him the other youths of the Achaeans bare the gifts. These then they set in the midst of the place of gathering, and Agamemnon 19.250. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.251. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.252. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.253. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.254. /rose up, and Talthybius, whose voice was like a god's, took his stand by the side of the shepherd of the people, holding a boar in his hands. And the son of Atreus drew forth with his hand the knife that ever hung beside the great sheath of his sword, and cut the firstling hairs from the boar, and lifting up his hands 19.255. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.256. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.257. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.258. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.259. /made prayer to Zeus; and all the Argives sat thereby in silence, hearkening as was meet unto the king. And he spake in prayer, with a look up to the wide heaven:Be Zeus my witness first, highest and best of gods, and Earth and Sun, and the Erinyes, that under earth 19.260. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.261. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.262. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.263. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.264. /take vengeance on men, whosoever hath sworn a false oath, that never laid I hand upon the girl Briseis either by way of a lover's embrace or anywise else, but she ever abode untouched in my huts. And if aught of this oath be false, may the gods give me woes 19.265. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.266. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.267. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives: 19.268. /full many, even all that they are wont to give to him whoso sinneth against them in his swearing. He spake, and cut the boar's throat with the pitiless bronze, and the body Talthybius whirled and flung into the great gulf of the grey sea, to be food for the fishes; but Achilles uprose, and spake among the war-loving Argives:
2. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 764, 773, 762 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

762. ἐγὼ δὲ χώρᾳ τῇδε καὶ τῷ σῷ στρατῷ
3. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 476-478, 324 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

324. ἐξολοίμην, ἢν ἀκούσω. μηδαμῶς ὦχαρνικοί.
4. Aristophanes, Birds, 445-447, 444 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

444. τόν —; οὐδαμῶς. οὔκ, ἀλλὰ τὠφθαλμὼ λέγω.
5. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 182-238, 181 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

181. τί δῆτα ταῦτ' οὐχ ὡς τάχιστ' ὦ Λαμπιτοῖ
6. Aristophanes, Clouds, 1255 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1255. θήσω πρυτανεῖ' ἢ μηκέτι ζῴην ἐγώ.
7. Aristophanes, Frogs, 586-588, 177 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

177. λάβ' ἐννέ' ὀβολούς. ἀναβιοίην νυν πάλιν.
8. Euripides, Cyclops, 270-272, 261 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

261. ἐγώ; κακῶς γ' ἄρ' ἐξόλοι'. 261. I? Perdition catch thee! Odysseu
9. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1026-1031, 1191, 1025 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1025. Now by Zeus, the god of oaths, and by the earth, whereon we stand, I swear to thee I never did lay hand upon thy wife nor would have wished to, or have harboured such a thought Slay me, ye gods! rob me of name and honour, from home and city cast me forth, a wandering exile o’er the earth!
10. Euripides, Iphigenia At Aulis, 1007, 948-954, 1006 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Iphigenia Among The Taurians, 736-752, 535 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Euripides, Medea, 113-114, 1329, 1389-1390, 163-165, 625-626, 735-755, 764-767, 803-806, 112 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Rhesus, 816 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

816. For this deed—I have sworn by Zeus our Lord !—
14. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 1188-1204, 1187 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Sophocles, Antigone, 414-425, 413 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 250-251, 644-645, 660-662, 249 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1000-1099, 11, 1100-1199, 12, 1200-1221, 1223-1278, 13-14, 144-149, 15, 150-153, 16-24, 242, 25-30, 307-309, 31, 310-311, 314, 316, 318, 32-35, 383-384, 555-581, 588, 590, 6, 623, 7-8, 808-809, 818-820, 9, 971-999, 10 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

10. who in three shapes was always asking me from my father—coming now as a bull in visible form, now as a serpent, sheeny and coiled, now ox-faced with human trunk, while from his thick-shaded beard wellheads of fountain-water sprayed.
18. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 2.20 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.20. Sed videamus Herculem ipsum, qui tum dolore frangebatur, cum inmortalitatem imm. R ipsa morte quaerebat: quas hic voces apud Sophoclem in Trachiniis trachinis X edit! cui cum Deianira sanguine Centauri tinctam tunicam induisset inhaesissetque inhesise V ea visceribus, ait ait s at X ille: “O mu/lta dictu gra/via, perpessu a/spera, Quae co/rpore exancla/ta exanclato k 2 atque animo pe/rtuli! Nec mi/hi Iunonis te/rror inplaca/bilis Nec ta/ntum invexit tri/stis Eurystheu/s euristeus X ( ex erusteus G 1 ) mali, Quantum u/na vaecors vęcors X ( sed R primo scripserat : unave corsoenei) Oe/nei partu e/dita. Haec me i/nretivit ve/ste furiali i/nscium, Quae la/tere inhaerens mo/rsu lacerat vi/scera Urge/nsque urguensque KR graviter pu/lmonum pulmonum -em K 2 haurit aurit GK 2? (h) R 1 (h add. c ) V spi/ritus: Iam de/colorem sa/nguinem omnem sanguinem omnem sorbul Diom. GL. i 366,28 exo/rbuit. iam ... exorbuit Char. GL. I 198,2 exsorbuit R c Sic si c G co/rpus clade clade V horri/bili absumptum e/xtabuit, Ipse i/nligatus pe/ste interimor te/xtili. interi morte textili R 2 Hos no/n hostilis de/xtra, non Terra e/dita Mole/s Gigantum, gigantium X no/n biformato i/mpetu Centau/rus ictus co/rpori inflixi/t infixit X inflixit V 2 meo, Non Gra/ia vis, non ba/rbara ulla inma/nitas, inm. KP imm. G ( man.) RV Non sae/va terris ge/ns relegata u/ltimis, Quas pe/ragrans undique o/mnem ecferitatem icferitatem GR 1 hicfer. KR c P effer. ( sed ef. in r. V c ) V e/xpuli, expulit GKRP ( sed t) expuli V Sed fe/minae feminae vir We. ( Bentl. ) vir fe/minea feminea vir X (vi G rec l vi P 2 ) interimo/r interemor G rec (m ex n) R 1 (i ss. R c ) V manu. O na/te, vere hoc no/men usurpa/ patri, Ne me o/ccidentem ma/tris superet ca/ritas. Huc a/rripe ad me ma/nibus abstracta/m piis; Iam ce/rnam, mene an i/llam potiore/m putes.
19. Epigraphy, Ml, 5.40-5.51



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acheloüs Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 419
actors Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 544
aegeus and medea Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 24, 25
alliances between states Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
antigone Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 419
blind oath Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 86
chorus, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
citizenship oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
colophon Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
contract, curse' Fletcher, Performing Oaths in Classical Greek Drama (2012) 86
cyrene Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
deianeira Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 419; Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
delphi, oaths at Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
destiny, of heracles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 544
dreams Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 419
eikadeus koine Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
episkêpsis Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 317
eros Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 419
euripides, works of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 764
eurydice Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 419
euthynoi Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
exodos, of the women of trachis (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 544
exodus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
fear Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
fortuna adversa Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
fortune Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
gender and oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 24
glauce (medea) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
gortyn Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
heracles Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 419
herakles, myth, genealogy Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 317
hercules Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 147
hero Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
hyllus, oath with Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 93
hyllus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 419; Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25, 93
hyperbaton Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 39
inscribed oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
iole (trachiniae) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
iphigeneia Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 24, 25
jason (medea), curses by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
lament Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
lichas (trachiniae) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
medea, and jasons perjury Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
medea, oath with aegeus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 24, 25
mt. oeta Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
nessus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 419
odysseus, curses against Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
odysseus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
official oaths, citizenship oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
official oaths, phratry oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
official oaths, secretaries Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
official oaths, tagoi Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
oracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 419
orchomenus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
orestes Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
pain Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
pistis Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 93
plants as oath witnesses, plataea, oath of Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
pledges and oaths, in sophocles Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 93
plot Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
reconciliation oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
revenge curses Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 25
satyr-dramas Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
secretaries oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
segues Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 147
self-curses, voluntary Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20, 24
sentences, flow interrupted Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 39
sophoclean language, clarity Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 39
sophoclean unlike gorgianic, unpredictable yet clear Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 39
sophocles, trachiniai Keith and Edmondson, Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle (2016) 147
speech Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
stasima, of the women of trachis (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 544
structure, of the women of trachis (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 544
suicide Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
telegonus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
thera Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20
triumph Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
trochaic septinarii Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
voluntary self-curses Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20, 24
will, and adoption Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 317
will Humphreys, Kinship in Ancient Athens: An Anthropological Analysis (2018) 317
women of trachis, the (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 544
written oaths Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 20