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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10416
Sophocles, Women Of Trachis, 1001-1111


nanWhere is the enchanter, where the practiced healer, save Zeus alone, who will charm this catastrophe away? I would be amazed if I saw him from even a great distance! Heracles:


nanWhere is the enchanter, where the practiced healer, save Zeus alone, who will charm this catastrophe away? I would be amazed if I saw him from even a great distance! Heracles:


nanWhere is the enchanter, where the practiced healer, save Zeus alone, who will charm this catastrophe away? I would be amazed if I saw him from even a great distance! Heracles:


nanAh!


nanLeave me! Leave me in my misfortune! Leave me to sleep my last. Where, where do you touch me? Where do you lay me? You will kill me, you will kill me! If there was any pain that slumbered, you have aroused it!


nanLeave me! Leave me in my misfortune! Leave me to sleep my last. Where, where do you touch me? Where do you lay me? You will kill me, you will kill me! If there was any pain that slumbered, you have aroused it!


nanLeave me! Leave me in my misfortune! Leave me to sleep my last. Where, where do you touch me? Where do you lay me? You will kill me, you will kill me! If there was any pain that slumbered, you have aroused it!


nanLeave me! Leave me in my misfortune! Leave me to sleep my last. Where, where do you touch me? Where do you lay me? You will kill me, you will kill me! If there was any pain that slumbered, you have aroused it!


nanLeave me! Leave me in my misfortune! Leave me to sleep my last. Where, where do you touch me? Where do you lay me? You will kill me, you will kill me! If there was any pain that slumbered, you have aroused it!


nanIt has seized me,—oh, the pest comes again!—What is your homeland, you men most ungrateful of all the Greeks? I wore out my wretched days in ridding the Greeks of pests both on the deep and throughout every forest. And now, when I am afflicted, will no man turn merciful fire or sword on me?


nanIt has seized me,—oh, the pest comes again!—What is your homeland, you men most ungrateful of all the Greeks? I wore out my wretched days in ridding the Greeks of pests both on the deep and throughout every forest. And now, when I am afflicted, will no man turn merciful fire or sword on me?


nanIt has seized me,—oh, the pest comes again!—What is your homeland, you men most ungrateful of all the Greeks? I wore out my wretched days in ridding the Greeks of pests both on the deep and throughout every forest. And now, when I am afflicted, will no man turn merciful fire or sword on me?


nanIt has seized me,—oh, the pest comes again!—What is your homeland, you men most ungrateful of all the Greeks? I wore out my wretched days in ridding the Greeks of pests both on the deep and throughout every forest. And now, when I am afflicted, will no man turn merciful fire or sword on me?


nanOLD MAN: Son of Heracles, this task exceeds my strength,- help thou,- for strength is at thy command, too largely to need my aid in his relief. HYLLUS: My hands are helping; but no resource, in myself or from another, avails me to make his life forget its anguish:- such is the doom appointed by Zeus! HERACLES: strophe 3 O my son, where art thou? Raise me,- take hold of me,- thus thus! Alas, my destiny! antistrophe 2 Again, again the cruel pest leaps forth to rend me, the fierce plague with which none may cope! O Pallas, Pallas, it tortures me again! Alas, my son, pity thy sire,- draw a blameless sword, and smite beneath my collar-bone, and heal this pain wherewith thy godless mother hath made me wild! So may I see her fall,- thus, even thus, as she hath destroyed me! antistrophe 3 Sweet Hades, brother of Zeus, give me rest, give me rest,- end my woe by a swiftly-sped doom! LEADER OF THE CHORUS: I shudder, friends, to hear these sorrows of our lord; what a man is here, and what torments afflict him! HERACLES: Ah, fierce full oft, and grievous not in name alone, have been the labours of these hands, the burdens borne upon these shoulders! But no toil ever laid on me by the wife of Zeus or by the hateful Eurystheus was like unto this thing which the daughter of Oineus, fair and false, hath fastened upon my back,- this woven net of the Furies, in which I perish! Glued to my sides, it hath eaten my flesh to the inmost parts; it is ever with me, sucking the channels of my breath; already it hath drained my fresh lifeblood, and my whole body is wasted, a captive to these unutterable bonds. Not the warrior on the battle-field, not the Giants' earth-born host, nor the might of savage beasts, hath ever done unto me thus,- not Hellas, nor the land of the alien, nor any land to which I have come as a deliverer: no, a woman, a weak woman, born not to the strength of man, all alone hath vanquished me, without stroke of sword Son, show thyself my son indeed, and do not honour a mother's name above a sire's: bring forth the woman that bare thee, and give her with thine own hands into my hand, that I may know of a truth which sight grieves thee most,- my tortured frame, or hers, when she suffers her righteous doom! Go, my son, shrink not- and show thy pity for me, whom many might deem pitiful,- for me, moaning and weeping like a girl;- and the man lives not who can say that he ever saw me do thus before; no, without complaining I still went whither mine evil fortune led. But now, alas, the strong man hath been found a woman. Approach, stand near thy sire, and see what a fate it is that hath brought me to this pass; for I will lift the veil. Behold! Look, all of you, on this miserable body; see how wretched, how piteous is my plight! Ah, woe is me! The burning throe of torment is there anew, it darts through my sides- I must wrestle once more with that cruel, devouring plague! O thou lord of the dark realm, receive me! Smite me, O fire of Zeus! Hurl down thy thunderbolt, O King, send it, O father, upon my head! For again the pest is consuming me; it hath blazed forth, it hath started into fury! O hands, my hands, O shoulders and breast and trusty arms, ye, now in this plight, are the same whose force of old subdued the dweller in Nemea, the scourge of herdsmen, the lion, a creature that no man might approach or confront; ye tamed the LernaeanHydra, and that monstrous host of double form, man joined to steed, a race with whom none may commune, violent, lawless, of surpassing might; ye tamed the Erymanthian beast, and the three-headed whelp of Hades underground, a resistless terror, offspring of the dread Echidna; ye tamed the dragon that guarded the golden fruit in the utmost places of the earth. These toils and countless others have I proved, nor hath any man vaunted a triumph over my prowess. But now, with joints unhinged and with flesh torn to shreds, I have become the miserable prey of an unseen destroyer,- I, who am called the son of noblest mother,- I, whose reputed sire is Zeus, lord of the starry sky. But ye may be sure of one thing:- though I am as nought, though I cannot move a step, yet she who hath done this deed shall feel my heavy hand even now: let her but come, and she shall learn to proclaim this message unto all, that in my death, as in my life, I chastised the wicked!


nanIt has seized me,—oh, the pest comes again!—What is your homeland, you men most ungrateful of all the Greeks? I wore out my wretched days in ridding the Greeks of pests both on the deep and throughout every forest. And now, when I am afflicted, will no man turn merciful fire or sword on me?


nanOh! Oh! Will no one come and strike the head from this accursed body with one fierce stroke? Ah, me! Old Man:


nanOh! Oh! Will no one come and strike the head from this accursed body with one fierce stroke? Ah, me! Old Man:


nanYou are the man’s son, and this task exceeds my strength. Help him, for the strength to save him is at your command


nanYou are the man’s son, and this task exceeds my strength. Help him, for the strength to save him is at your command


nanYou are the man’s son, and this task exceeds my strength. Help him, for the strength to save him is at your command


nanYou are the man’s son, and this task exceeds my strength. Help him, for the strength to save him is at your command


nanYou are the man’s son, and this task exceeds my strength. Help him, for the strength to save him is at your command


nanYou are the man’s son, and this task exceeds my strength. Help him, for the strength to save him is at your command


nanYou are the man’s son, and this task exceeds my strength. Help him, for the strength to save him is at your command


nanO my son, where are you?


nanRaise me, take hold of me here, here! Oh, oh, my god! Again, again the cruel pest leaps, leaps up to rend me, the


nanRaise me, take hold of me here, here! Oh, oh, my god! Again, again the cruel pest leaps, leaps up to rend me, the


nanRaise me, take hold of me here, here! Oh, oh, my god! Again, again the cruel pest leaps, leaps up to rend me, the


nanRaise me, take hold of me here, here! Oh, oh, my god! Again, again the cruel pest leaps, leaps up to rend me, the


nanRaise me, take hold of me here, here! Oh, oh, my god! Again, again the cruel pest leaps, leaps up to rend me, the


nanwild, uncombatable plague! O Pallas, Pallas, it tortures me again! oh, please, my son, pity your sire! Draw a sword—you will not be blamed for it—strike me beneath my collarbone.


nanwild, uncombatable plague! O Pallas, Pallas, it tortures me again! oh, please, my son, pity your sire! Draw a sword—you will not be blamed for it—strike me beneath my collarbone.


nanwild, uncombatable plague! O Pallas, Pallas, it tortures me again! oh, please, my son, pity your sire! Draw a sword—you will not be blamed for it—strike me beneath my collarbone.


nanwild, uncombatable plague! O Pallas, Pallas, it tortures me again! oh, please, my son, pity your sire! Draw a sword—you will not be blamed for it—strike me beneath my collarbone.


nanwild, uncombatable plague! O Pallas, Pallas, it tortures me again! oh, please, my son, pity your sire! Draw a sword—you will not be blamed for it—strike me beneath my collarbone.


nanHeal this pain with which your godless mother has enraged me! So may I see her fall to ruin, exactly, just exactly, as she has destroyed me!


nanHeal this pain with which your godless mother has enraged me! So may I see her fall to ruin, exactly, just exactly, as she has destroyed me!


nanHeal this pain with which your godless mother has enraged me! So may I see her fall to ruin, exactly, just exactly, as she has destroyed me!


nanHeal this pain with which your godless mother has enraged me! So may I see her fall to ruin, exactly, just exactly, as she has destroyed me!


nanHeal this pain with which your godless mother has enraged me! So may I see her fall to ruin, exactly, just exactly, as she has destroyed me!


nanSweet Hades, brother of Zeus, give me sleep, give me sleep. Kill me in my misery by a swift-flying doom! Chorus:


nanSweet Hades, brother of Zeus, give me sleep, give me sleep. Kill me in my misery by a swift-flying doom! Chorus:


nanSweet Hades, brother of Zeus, give me sleep, give me sleep. Kill me in my misery by a swift-flying doom! Chorus:


nanSweet Hades, brother of Zeus, give me sleep, give me sleep. Kill me in my misery by a swift-flying doom! Chorus:


nanI shudder, friends, to hear these sorrows


nanwhich our King suffers. What a man is here, and what misfortunes lash at him! Heracles:


nanAh, many and hot and cruel not in name alone have been the labors of these hands, the burdens hoisted upon these shoulders! And yet no toil ever laid on me by the bedfellow of Zeus or by the hateful Eurystheus was as harsh


nanAh, many and hot and cruel not in name alone have been the labors of these hands, the burdens hoisted upon these shoulders! And yet no toil ever laid on me by the bedfellow of Zeus or by the hateful Eurystheus was as harsh


nanAh, many and hot and cruel not in name alone have been the labors of these hands, the burdens hoisted upon these shoulders! And yet no toil ever laid on me by the bedfellow of Zeus or by the hateful Eurystheus was as harsh


nanAh, many and hot and cruel not in name alone have been the labors of these hands, the burdens hoisted upon these shoulders! And yet no toil ever laid on me by the bedfellow of Zeus or by the hateful Eurystheus was as harsh


nanas this thing which the daughter of Oeneus, fair and false, has fastened upon my back, this woven net of the Erinyes in which I perish! Plastered to my sides, it has eaten away my inmost flesh and sucks the channels of my lungs


nanas this thing which the daughter of Oeneus, fair and false, has fastened upon my back, this woven net of the Erinyes in which I perish! Plastered to my sides, it has eaten away my inmost flesh and sucks the channels of my lungs


nanas this thing which the daughter of Oeneus, fair and false, has fastened upon my back, this woven net of the Erinyes in which I perish! Plastered to my sides, it has eaten away my inmost flesh and sucks the channels of my lungs


nanas this thing which the daughter of Oeneus, fair and false, has fastened upon my back, this woven net of the Erinyes in which I perish! Plastered to my sides, it has eaten away my inmost flesh and sucks the channels of my lungs


nanas this thing which the daughter of Oeneus, fair and false, has fastened upon my back, this woven net of the Erinyes in which I perish! Plastered to my sides, it has eaten away my inmost flesh and sucks the channels of my lungs


nanmaking my body its home. Already it has drunk away my fresh lifeblood, and my whole body is wasted, conquered by these indescribable bonds. Not spearmen on the battlefield, nor the Giants’ earth-born army, nor the might of savage beasts


nanmaking my body its home. Already it has drunk away my fresh lifeblood, and my whole body is wasted, conquered by these indescribable bonds. Not spearmen on the battlefield, nor the Giants’ earth-born army, nor the might of savage beasts


nanmaking my body its home. Already it has drunk away my fresh lifeblood, and my whole body is wasted, conquered by these indescribable bonds. Not spearmen on the battlefield, nor the Giants’ earth-born army, nor the might of savage beasts


nanmaking my body its home. Already it has drunk away my fresh lifeblood, and my whole body is wasted, conquered by these indescribable bonds. Not spearmen on the battlefield, nor the Giants’ earth-born army, nor the might of savage beasts


nanmaking my body its home. Already it has drunk away my fresh lifeblood, and my whole body is wasted, conquered by these indescribable bonds. Not spearmen on the battlefield, nor the Giants’ earth-born army, nor the might of savage beasts


nannot Hellas, nor the land of the barbarian, nor any land which I came to purify has ever done this to me. No, a woman, a weak woman, born not to the strength of man, all alone has brought me down without a stroke of the sword! Son, show yourself my trueborn son


nannot Hellas, nor the land of the barbarian, nor any land which I came to purify has ever done this to me. No, a woman, a weak woman, born not to the strength of man, all alone has brought me down without a stroke of the sword! Son, show yourself my trueborn son


nannot Hellas, nor the land of the barbarian, nor any land which I came to purify has ever done this to me. No, a woman, a weak woman, born not to the strength of man, all alone has brought me down without a stroke of the sword! Son, show yourself my trueborn son


nannot Hellas, nor the land of the barbarian, nor any land which I came to purify has ever done this to me. No, a woman, a weak woman, born not to the strength of man, all alone has brought me down without a stroke of the sword! Son, show yourself my trueborn son


nannot Hellas, nor the land of the barbarian, nor any land which I came to purify has ever done this to me. No, a woman, a weak woman, born not to the strength of man, all alone has brought me down without a stroke of the sword! Son, show yourself my trueborn son


nanand do not honor your mother’s name above your father’s. Bring out the woman that bore you, and give her with your own hands into my hand, that I may know for certain which sight grieves you more—my tortured frame, or hers, when she suffers her just punishment!


nanand do not honor your mother’s name above your father’s. Bring out the woman that bore you, and give her with your own hands into my hand, that I may know for certain which sight grieves you more—my tortured frame, or hers, when she suffers her just punishment!


nanand do not honor your mother’s name above your father’s. Bring out the woman that bore you, and give her with your own hands into my hand, that I may know for certain which sight grieves you more—my tortured frame, or hers, when she suffers her just punishment!


nanand do not honor your mother’s name above your father’s. Bring out the woman that bore you, and give her with your own hands into my hand, that I may know for certain which sight grieves you more—my tortured frame, or hers, when she suffers her just punishment!


nanand do not honor your mother’s name above your father’s. Bring out the woman that bore you, and give her with your own hands into my hand, that I may know for certain which sight grieves you more—my tortured frame, or hers, when she suffers her just punishment!


nanGo, my son, be bold! Show your pity for me, whom many might think deserving of pity—pity me moaning and weeping like a girl! No one could say that he had ever seen this man do that before. No, always without complaint I used to pursue my troubles.


nanGo, my son, be bold! Show your pity for me, whom many might think deserving of pity—pity me moaning and weeping like a girl! No one could say that he had ever seen this man do that before. No, always without complaint I used to pursue my troubles.


nanGo, my son, be bold! Show your pity for me, whom many might think deserving of pity—pity me moaning and weeping like a girl! No one could say that he had ever seen this man do that before. No, always without complaint I used to pursue my troubles.


nanGo, my son, be bold! Show your pity for me, whom many might think deserving of pity—pity me moaning and weeping like a girl! No one could say that he had ever seen this man do that before. No, always without complaint I used to pursue my troubles.


nanGo, my son, be bold! Show your pity for me, whom many might think deserving of pity—pity me moaning and weeping like a girl! No one could say that he had ever seen this man do that before. No, always without complaint I used to pursue my troubles.


nanBut now in my misery I have been found a woman, instead of the man I used to be.


nanCome close, stand near your father and do examine the magnitude of the misfortune by which I suffer; for I will uncover my suffering. Look! See all of you this miserable body;


nanCome close, stand near your father and do examine the magnitude of the misfortune by which I suffer; for I will uncover my suffering. Look! See all of you this miserable body;


nanCome close, stand near your father and do examine the magnitude of the misfortune by which I suffer; for I will uncover my suffering. Look! See all of you this miserable body;


nanCome close, stand near your father and do examine the magnitude of the misfortune by which I suffer; for I will uncover my suffering. Look! See all of you this miserable body;


nanee how wretched, how pitiable I am! Ah, misery! The ruinous spasm flames again; it shoots through my sides—I must wrestle once more with that cruel, devouring plague!


nanee how wretched, how pitiable I am! Ah, misery! The ruinous spasm flames again; it shoots through my sides—I must wrestle once more with that cruel, devouring plague!


nanee how wretched, how pitiable I am! Ah, misery! The ruinous spasm flames again; it shoots through my sides—I must wrestle once more with that cruel, devouring plague!


nanee how wretched, how pitiable I am! Ah, misery! The ruinous spasm flames again; it shoots through my sides—I must wrestle once more with that cruel, devouring plague!


nanee how wretched, how pitiable I am! Ah, misery! The ruinous spasm flames again; it shoots through my sides—I must wrestle once more with that cruel, devouring plague!


nanKing Hades, receive me! Strike me, O fire of Zeus! Hurl down your thunderbolt, ruler, dash it, Father, upon my head! Again the pest consumes me, it has blazed up, it has leapt to fury! O hands, my hands


nanKing Hades, receive me! Strike me, O fire of Zeus! Hurl down your thunderbolt, ruler, dash it, Father, upon my head! Again the pest consumes me, it has blazed up, it has leapt to fury! O hands, my hands


nanKing Hades, receive me! Strike me, O fire of Zeus! Hurl down your thunderbolt, ruler, dash it, Father, upon my head! Again the pest consumes me, it has blazed up, it has leapt to fury! O hands, my hands


nanKing Hades, receive me! Strike me, O fire of Zeus! Hurl down your thunderbolt, ruler, dash it, Father, upon my head! Again the pest consumes me, it has blazed up, it has leapt to fury! O hands, my hands


nanKing Hades, receive me! Strike me, O fire of Zeus! Hurl down your thunderbolt, ruler, dash it, Father, upon my head! Again the pest consumes me, it has blazed up, it has leapt to fury! O hands, my hands


nanO shoulders and chest and trusty arms, you are indeed those noted arms which once subdued with your might the dweller in Nemea, the scourge of herdsmen, the lion, a creature that no man might approach or confront; you tamed the Lernaean Hydra


nanO shoulders and chest and trusty arms, you are indeed those noted arms which once subdued with your might the dweller in Nemea, the scourge of herdsmen, the lion, a creature that no man might approach or confront; you tamed the Lernaean Hydra


nanO shoulders and chest and trusty arms, you are indeed those noted arms which once subdued with your might the dweller in Nemea, the scourge of herdsmen, the lion, a creature that no man might approach or confront; you tamed the Lernaean Hydra


nanO shoulders and chest and trusty arms, you are indeed those noted arms which once subdued with your might the dweller in Nemea, the scourge of herdsmen, the lion, a creature that no man might approach or confront; you tamed the Lernaean Hydra


nanO shoulders and chest and trusty arms, you are indeed those noted arms which once subdued with your might the dweller in Nemea, the scourge of herdsmen, the lion, a creature that no man might approach or confront; you tamed the Lernaean Hydra


nanand that monstrous army of beasts with double form, hostile, going on hoofed feet, violent, lawless, of surpassing violence; you tamed the beast in Erymanthia, and underground the three-headed whelp of Hades, a resistless terror, offspring of the fierce Echidna; you tamed the dragon


nanand that monstrous army of beasts with double form, hostile, going on hoofed feet, violent, lawless, of surpassing violence; you tamed the beast in Erymanthia, and underground the three-headed whelp of Hades, a resistless terror, offspring of the fierce Echidna; you tamed the dragon


nanand that monstrous army of beasts with double form, hostile, going on hoofed feet, violent, lawless, of surpassing violence; you tamed the beast in Erymanthia, and underground the three-headed whelp of Hades, a resistless terror, offspring of the fierce Echidna; you tamed the dragon


nanand that monstrous army of beasts with double form, hostile, going on hoofed feet, violent, lawless, of surpassing violence; you tamed the beast in Erymanthia, and underground the three-headed whelp of Hades, a resistless terror, offspring of the fierce Echidna; you tamed the dragon


nanand that monstrous army of beasts with double form, hostile, going on hoofed feet, violent, lawless, of surpassing violence; you tamed the beast in Erymanthia, and underground the three-headed whelp of Hades, a resistless terror, offspring of the fierce Echidna; you tamed the dragon


nanthat guarded the golden fruit in the farthest places of the earth. These toils and thousands more have I tasted, and no man has ever erected a trophy of victory over my hands. But now, with joints unhinged and with flesh torn to shreds, I have become the miserable spoil of an unseen destroyer


nanthat guarded the golden fruit in the farthest places of the earth. These toils and thousands more have I tasted, and no man has ever erected a trophy of victory over my hands. But now, with joints unhinged and with flesh torn to shreds, I have become the miserable spoil of an unseen destroyer


nanthat guarded the golden fruit in the farthest places of the earth. These toils and thousands more have I tasted, and no man has ever erected a trophy of victory over my hands. But now, with joints unhinged and with flesh torn to shreds, I have become the miserable spoil of an unseen destroyer


nanthat guarded the golden fruit in the farthest places of the earth. These toils and thousands more have I tasted, and no man has ever erected a trophy of victory over my hands. But now, with joints unhinged and with flesh torn to shreds, I have become the miserable spoil of an unseen destroyer


nanthat guarded the golden fruit in the farthest places of the earth. These toils and thousands more have I tasted, and no man has ever erected a trophy of victory over my hands. But now, with joints unhinged and with flesh torn to shreds, I have become the miserable spoil of an unseen destroyer


nan—I, who am called the son of noblest mother, I, who am reputed the seed of Zeus, lord of the starry sky. But you may be sure of one thing: though I am nothing, though I cannot move a step, yet she who has done this deed shall feel my heavy hand even so. Let her but come to me


nan—I, who am called the son of noblest mother, I, who am reputed the seed of Zeus, lord of the starry sky. But you may be sure of one thing: though I am nothing, though I cannot move a step, yet she who has done this deed shall feel my heavy hand even so. Let her but come to me


nan—I, who am called the son of noblest mother, I, who am reputed the seed of Zeus, lord of the starry sky. But you may be sure of one thing: though I am nothing, though I cannot move a step, yet she who has done this deed shall feel my heavy hand even so. Let her but come to me


nan—I, who am called the son of noblest mother, I, who am reputed the seed of Zeus, lord of the starry sky. But you may be sure of one thing: though I am nothing, though I cannot move a step, yet she who has done this deed shall feel my heavy hand even so. Let her but come to me


nan—I, who am called the son of noblest mother, I, who am reputed the seed of Zeus, lord of the starry sky. But you may be sure of one thing: though I am nothing, though I cannot move a step, yet she who has done this deed shall feel my heavy hand even so. Let her but come to me


nano that she may learn to proclaim this message to all the world, that in my death, as in my life, I punished the guilty! Chorus:


nano that she may learn to proclaim this message to all the world, that in my death, as in my life, I punished the guilty! Chorus:


nanLEADER: Ah, hapless Greece, what mourning do I forsee for her, if she must lose this man HYLLUS: Father, since thy pause permits an answer, hear me, afflicted though thou art. I will ask thee for no more than is my due. Accept my counsels, in a calmer mood than that to which this anger stings thee: else thou canst not learn how vain is thy desire for vengeance, and how causeless thy resentment. HERACLES: Say what thou wilt, and cease; in this my pain I understand nought of all thy riddling words. HYLLUS: I come to tell thee of my mother,- how it is now with her, and how she sinned unwittingly. HERACLES: Villain! What- hast thou dared to breathe her name again in my hearing,- the name of the mother who hath slain thy sire? HYLLUS: Yea, such is her state that silence is unmeet. HERACLES: Unmeet, truly, in view of her past crimes. HYLLUS: And also of her deeds this day,- as thou wilt own. HERACLES: Speak,- but give heed that thou be not found a traitor. HYLLUS: These are my tidings. She is dead, lately slain. HERACLES: By whose hand? A wondrous message, from a prophet of ill-omened voice! HYLLUS: By her own hand, and no stranger's.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Sophocles, Ajax, 350, 364-367, 379-383, 387-391, 394-395, 401-402, 412-413, 349 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 1002-1278, 971-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1000. Where is the enchanter, where the practiced healer, save Zeus alone, who will charm this catastrophe away? I would be amazed if I saw him from even a great distance! Heracles:
3. Cicero, Tusculan Disputations, 2.20 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

2.20. Sed videamus Herculem ipsum, qui tum dolore frangebatur, cum inmortalitatem imm. R ipsa morte quaerebat: quas hic voces apud Sophoclem in Trachiniis trachinis X edit! cui cum Deianira sanguine Centauri tinctam tunicam induisset inhaesissetque inhesise V ea visceribus, ait ait s at X ille: “O mu/lta dictu gra/via, perpessu a/spera, Quae co/rpore exancla/ta exanclato k 2 atque animo pe/rtuli! Nec mi/hi Iunonis te/rror inplaca/bilis Nec ta/ntum invexit tri/stis Eurystheu/s euristeus X ( ex erusteus G 1 ) mali, Quantum u/na vaecors vęcors X ( sed R primo scripserat : unave corsoenei) Oe/nei partu e/dita. Haec me i/nretivit ve/ste furiali i/nscium, Quae la/tere inhaerens mo/rsu lacerat vi/scera Urge/nsque urguensque KR graviter pu/lmonum pulmonum -em K 2 haurit aurit GK 2? (h) R 1 (h add. c ) V spi/ritus: Iam de/colorem sa/nguinem omnem sanguinem omnem sorbul Diom. GL. i 366,28 exo/rbuit. iam ... exorbuit Char. GL. I 198,2 exsorbuit R c Sic si c G co/rpus clade clade V horri/bili absumptum e/xtabuit, Ipse i/nligatus pe/ste interimor te/xtili. interi morte textili R 2 Hos no/n hostilis de/xtra, non Terra e/dita Mole/s Gigantum, gigantium X no/n biformato i/mpetu Centau/rus ictus co/rpori inflixi/t infixit X inflixit V 2 meo, Non Gra/ia vis, non ba/rbara ulla inma/nitas, inm. KP imm. G ( man.) RV Non sae/va terris ge/ns relegata u/ltimis, Quas pe/ragrans undique o/mnem ecferitatem icferitatem GR 1 hicfer. KR c P effer. ( sed ef. in r. V c ) V e/xpuli, expulit GKRP ( sed t) expuli V Sed fe/minae feminae vir We. ( Bentl. ) vir fe/minea feminea vir X (vi G rec l vi P 2 ) interimo/r interemor G rec (m ex n) R 1 (i ss. R c ) V manu. O na/te, vere hoc no/men usurpa/ patri, Ne me o/ccidentem ma/tris superet ca/ritas. Huc a/rripe ad me ma/nibus abstracta/m piis; Iam ce/rnam, mene an i/llam potiore/m putes.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actors Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 544
ajax, singing of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 274
anapaestic meter Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 717
antistrophe Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 717
aristotle, on singing Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 274
commoi Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 274
destiny, of heracles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 544
dialogue, sung Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 274
diction, changes in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 274
exodos, of the women of trachis (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 544
exodus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
fear Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
fortuna adversa Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
fortune Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
gods, epithets Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 160, 161
gods, named and unnamed Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 160, 161
heracles, singing of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 274
heracles Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
hero Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
hyllus, and heracles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 274
hyllus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
lament Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
lamentation, song of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 274
men, in the commoi Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 274
monodies Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 717
mt. oeta Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
names, gods named and unnamed Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 160, 161
nessus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
odysseus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
pain, in the commoi Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 274
pain Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
plot Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
poetics (aristotle), on singing Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 274
rhythm, change of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 717
spectators, text uncertain Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 160
speech Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
stasima, of the women of trachis (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 544
strophe Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 717
structure, of the women of trachis (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 544
suicide Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
telegonus Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
trachiniae, zeus Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 160, 161
triumph Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
trochaic septinarii' Harrison, Brill's Companion to Roman Tragedy (2015) 57
women of trachis, the (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 544
zeus Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 160, 161