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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10415
Sophocles, Philoctetes, 300-304


nanyou should know some facts about this island. No sailor ever comes too near this place — not if he can help it. There's no moorage or any port where he can buy and sell to make a profit or find a welcome host. So men with any sense don't travel here. If someone ever came unwillingly — such things do happen often over time in the full span of one's life — well then, when they arrived, my boy, they'd talk to me, speak a few sympathetic words, and then, from pity, add some food or clothing. But there's one thing no one would ever do, once I suggested it — take me safely home. This is the tenth year of my misery, wasting away in hunger and distress, eaten up by this gluttonous disease. This is the work of those sons of Atreus and Odysseus, that brutal man. They did this. May the Olympian gods give them someday full retribution for my agonies! CHORUS: Son of Poeas, I pity you, as well — just like those visitors you had before. NEOPTOLEMUS: I, too, can testify to what you say. You speak the truth. For I've experienced


nanCome now, son, you must understand what sort of island this is. No mariner approaches it by choice, since there is no anchorage or port where he can find a gainful market or a kindly host. This is not a place to which prudent men voyage. But suppose that some one has put in against his will, for such things may often


nanCome now, son, you must understand what sort of island this is. No mariner approaches it by choice, since there is no anchorage or port where he can find a gainful market or a kindly host. This is not a place to which prudent men voyage. But suppose that some one has put in against his will, for such things may often


nanCome now, son, you must understand what sort of island this is. No mariner approaches it by choice, since there is no anchorage or port where he can find a gainful market or a kindly host. This is not a place to which prudent men voyage. But suppose that some one has put in against his will, for such things may often


nanCome now, son, you must understand what sort of island this is. No mariner approaches it by choice, since there is no anchorage or port where he can find a gainful market or a kindly host. This is not a place to which prudent men voyage. But suppose that some one has put in against his will, for such things may often


nanCome now, son, you must understand what sort of island this is. No mariner approaches it by choice, since there is no anchorage or port where he can find a gainful market or a kindly host. This is not a place to which prudent men voyage. But suppose that some one has put in against his will, for such things may often


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

4 results
1. Sophocles, Philoctetes, 1341, 164, 166-167, 173, 191-200, 212-218, 226-228, 234, 237, 242, 257, 265-266, 268-295, 297, 301-304, 311, 313-316, 319-460, 468-503, 507-521, 528-529, 533, 554-556, 561-602, 610-619, 622-637, 662-670, 855-861, 1340 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 8.47-8.48, 8.53.2, 8.65.2, 8.70.1, 8.81-8.82, 8.81.2, 8.89, 8.97.3, 8.108 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8.53.2. A number of speakers opposed them on the question of the democracy, the enemies of Alcibiades cried out against the scandal of a restoration to be effected by a violation of the constitution, and the Eumolpidae and Ceryces protested in behalf of the mysteries, the cause of his banishment, and called upon the gods to avert his recall; when Pisander, in the midst of much opposition and abuse, came forward, and taking each of his opponents aside asked him the following question:—In the face of the fact that the Peloponnesians had as many ships as their own confronting them at sea, more cities in alliance with them, and the king and Tissaphernes to supply them with money, of which the Athenians had none left, had he any hope of saving the state, unless some one could induce the king to come over to their side? 8.65.2. Here they found most of the work already done by their associates. Some of the younger men had banded together, and secretly assassinated one Androcles, the chief leader of the commons, and mainly responsible for the banishment of Alcibiades; Androcles being singled out both because he was a popular leader, and because they sought by his death to recommend themselves to Alcibiades, who was, as they supposed, to be recalled, and to make Tissaphernes their friend. There were also some other obnoxious persons whom they secretly did away with in the same manner. 8.70.1. Upon the Council withdrawing in this way without venturing any objection, and the rest of the citizens making no movement, the Four Hundred entered the council chamber, and for the present contented themselves with drawing lots for their Prytanes, and making their prayers and sacrifices to the gods upon entering office, but afterwards departed widely from the democratic system of government, and except that on account of Alcibiades they did not recall the exiles, ruled the city by force; 8.81.2. An assembly was then held in which Alcibiades complained of and deplored his private misfortune in having been banished, and speaking at great length upon public affairs, highly incited their hopes for the future, and extravagantly magnified his own influence with Tissaphernes. His object in this was to make the oligarchical government at Athens afraid of him, to hasten the dissolution of the clubs, to increase his credit with the army at Samos and heighten their own confidence, and lastly to prejudice the enemy as strongly as possible against Tissaphernes, and blast the hopes which they entertained. 8.97.3. They also voted for the recall of Alcibiades and of other exiles, and sent to him and to the camp at Samos, and urged them to devote themselves vigorously to the war.
3. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.4.18 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.4.18. Meanwhile Alcibiades, who had come to anchor close to the shore, did not at once disembark, through fear of his enemies; but mounting upon the deck of 407 B.C. his ship, he looked to see whether his friends were present.
4. Plutarch, Alcibiades, 32.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

32.2. Duris the Samian, who claims that he was a descendant of Alcibiades, gives some additional details. He says that the oarsmen of Alcibiades rowed to the music of a flute blown by Chrysogonus the Pythian victor; that they kept time to a rhythmic call from the lips of Callipides the tragic actor; that both these artists were arrayed in the long tunics, flowing robes, and other adornment of their profession; and that the commander’s ship put into harbors with a sail of purple hue, as though, after a drinking bout, he were off on a revel.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
alcibiades Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 641
anger, of philoctetes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 530
bestialisation Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 113
corpse' Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 113
diodorus siculus, on alcibiades Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 641
episodes, of philoctetes (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 530
eumolpides, the Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 641
euripides, and philoctetes (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 530
general parodos, of philoctetes (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 530
kerykes, the Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 641
lemnos Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 113
neoptolemus Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 113
philoctetes Gazis and Hooper, Aspects of Death and the Afterlife in Greek Literature (2021) 113; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 530
philoctetes (sophocles), and alcibiades Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 641
philoctetes (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 530
plutarch, on alcibiades Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 641
prologue, of philoctetes (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 530
structure, of philoctetes (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 530