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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10414
Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 964-966


nanAlas, alas! Why indeed, my wife, should one look to the


nanhearth of the Pythian seer, or to the birds that scream above our heads, who declared that I was doomed to slay my father? But he is dead, and lies beneath the earth, and here I am, not having put my hand to any spear—unless, perhaps, he died out of longing for me:


nanhearth of the Pythian seer, or to the birds that scream above our heads, who declared that I was doomed to slay my father? But he is dead, and lies beneath the earth, and here I am, not having put my hand to any spear—unless, perhaps, he died out of longing for me:


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

8 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.68-1.69, 1.106, 1.122 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.68. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.69. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose Calchas son of Thestor, far the best of bird-diviners, who knew the things that were, and that were to be, and that had been before 1.106. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.122. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned
2. Herodotus, Histories, 7.140-7.141 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.140. The Athenians had sent messages to Delphi asking that an oracle be given them, and when they had performed all due rites at the temple and sat down in the inner hall, the priestess, whose name was Aristonice, gave them this answer: , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Wretches, why do you linger here? Rather flee from your houses and city, /l lFlee to the ends of the earth from the circle embattled of Athens! /l lThe head will not remain in its place, nor in the body, /l lNor the feet beneath, nor the hands, nor the parts between; /l lBut all is ruined, for fire and the headlong god of war speeding in a Syrian chariot will bring you low. /l /quote , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Many a fortress too, not yours alone, will he shatter; /l lMany a shrine of the gods will he give to the flame for devouring; /l lSweating for fear they stand, and quaking for dread of the enemy, /l lRunning with gore are their roofs, foreseeing the stress of their sorrow; /l lTherefore I bid you depart from the sanctuary. /l lHave courage to lighten your evil. /l /quote 7.141. When the Athenian messengers heard that, they were very greatly dismayed, and gave themselves up for lost by reason of the evil foretold. Then Timon son of Androbulus, as notable a man as any Delphian, advised them to take boughs of supplication and in the guise of suppliants, approach the oracle a second time. ,The Athenians did exactly this; “Lord,” they said, “regard mercifully these suppliant boughs which we bring to you, and give us some better answer concerning our country. Otherwise we will not depart from your temple, but remain here until we die.” Thereupon the priestess gave them this second oracle: , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Vainly does Pallas strive to appease great Zeus of Olympus; /l lWords of entreaty are vain, and so too cunning counsels of wisdom. /l lNevertheless I will speak to you again of strength adamantine. /l lAll will be taken and lost that the sacred border of Cecrops /l lHolds in keeping today, and the dales divine of Cithaeron; /l lYet a wood-built wall will by Zeus all-seeing be granted /l lTo the Trito-born, a stronghold for you and your children. /l /quote , quote type="oracle" l met="dact"Await not the host of horse and foot coming from Asia, /l lNor be still, but turn your back and withdraw from the foe. /l lTruly a day will come when you will meet him face to face. /l lDivine Salamis, you will bring death to women's sons /l lWhen the corn is scattered, or the harvest gathered in. /l /quote
3. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4. Sophocles, Antigone, 1001-1090, 115-154, 988-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 101, 1012-1013, 1016-1019, 102, 1020, 103, 1032, 1036, 104-106, 1068, 107, 1071-1075, 1080-1082, 1092, 110, 1105-1107, 111, 1129-1131, 1133-1139, 114-115, 1169-1170, 1177-1181, 1184-1185, 1223-1296, 139-146, 288-289, 298-304, 307, 312-313, 316-317, 320-321, 324-403, 405, 408-425, 429-444, 448-462, 532-630, 709, 711-712, 85, 863-869, 87, 870-879, 88, 880-909, 91, 910-919, 92, 920-923, 928, 946, 95, 953, 96, 965-969, 97, 970-972, 976, 98-100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 538, 552-553, 555-581, 584-587, 623, 629-630, 537 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

537. and partly to grieve over my sufferings in your company. I have received a maiden—or, I believe, no longer a maiden, but an experienced woman—into my home, just as a mariner takes on cargo, a merchandise to wreck my peace of mind. And now we are two, a pair waiting under
7. Seneca The Younger, Hercules Oetaeus, 486-538, 567-582, 485 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

8. Seneca The Younger, Oedipus, 216, 233-238, 286, 418, 509, 697-708, 838-881, 915-979, 212 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
ajax (sophocles), seer in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
antigone (sophocles), a seer in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
antigone (sophocles), and seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
calchas, as the voice of the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
cithaeron, and oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 512
decisions, in virtual space Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 757
dedoktai Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 757
episodes, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 511, 512
fear, of oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 511, 512
gods, and humans Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
hercules on oeta (seneca) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
humans, and the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
information, from the outside, by seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
interpreters, of the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
jocasta (epicaste), and tiresias Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
messengers, arrival of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 757
oedipus, and tiresias Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 511, 512; Struck, Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity (2016) 38, 39
oedipus the king (sophocles), and seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
oedipus the king (sophocles), seer in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 511, 512
oracle, challenges to Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
oracles, delphic Struck, Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity (2016) 38, 39
philter, from deianira Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
rhythm, agitated Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 757
seers, challenges to Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
stasima, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 511, 512
structure, of oedipus the king (sophocles)' Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 511
structure, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 512
tiresias, challenges to Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
tiresias Struck, Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity (2016) 38
wisdom Struck, Divination and Human Nature: A Cognitive History of Intuition in Classical Antiquity (2016) 39
women of trachis, the (sophocles), and seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763