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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10414
Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 911


nanPrinces of the land, I am planning to visit the shrines of the gods, with this wreathed branch and these gifts of incense in my hands. For Oedipus excites his soul excessively with all sorts of grief


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

23 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 3.302, 6.297-6.310, 9.223-9.225 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3.302. /may their brains be thus poured forth upon the ground even as this wine, theirs and their children's; and may their wives be made slaves to others. 6.297. /and shone like a star, and lay undermost of all. Then she went her way, and the throng of aged wives hastened after her. 6.298. /and shone like a star, and lay undermost of all. Then she went her way, and the throng of aged wives hastened after her. 6.299. /and shone like a star, and lay undermost of all. Then she went her way, and the throng of aged wives hastened after her. Now when they were come to the temple of Athene in the citadel, the doors were opened for them by fair-cheeked Theano, daughter of Cisseus, the wife of Antenor, tamer of horses; 6.300. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.301. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.302. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.303. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.304. /for her had the Trojans made priestess of Athene. Then with sacred cries they all lifted up their hands to Athene; and fair-cheeked Theano took the robe and laid it upon the knees of fair-haired Athene, and with vows made prayer to the daughter of great Zeus: 6.305. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.306. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.307. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.308. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.309. / Lady Athene, that dost guard our city, fairest among goddesses, break now the spear of Diomedes, and grant furthermore that himself may fall headlong before the Scaean gates; to the end that we may now forthwith sacrifice to thee in thy temple twelve sleek heifers that have not felt the goad, if thou wilt take pity 6.310. /on Troy and the Trojans' wives and their little children. So spake she praying, but Pallas Athene denied the prayer.Thus were these praying to the daughter of great Zeus, but Hector went his way to the palace of Alexander, the fair palace that himself had builded with the men 9.223. /and Patroclus cast burnt-offering into the fire. So they put forth their hands to the good cheer lying ready before them. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, Aias nodded to Phoenix; and goodly Odysseus was ware thereof, and filling a cup with wine he pledged Achilles: 9.224. /and Patroclus cast burnt-offering into the fire. So they put forth their hands to the good cheer lying ready before them. But when they had put from them the desire of food and drink, Aias nodded to Phoenix; and goodly Odysseus was ware thereof, and filling a cup with wine he pledged Achilles: 9.225. / Hail, O Achilles, of the equal feast have we no stinting, either in the hut of Agamemnon, son of Atreus, or now in thine; for here is abundance that satisfies the heart to feast withal. Yet matters of the delicious feast are not in our thoughts, nay, Zeus-nurtured one, it is utter ruin that we behold, and are afraid;
2. Homer, Odyssey, 3.273-3.275, 9.231-9.232, 9.551-9.555, 12.356-12.365, 12.387-12.388, 15.223, 15.257-15.258, 15.260 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Agamemnon, 1055-1057, 91, 1054 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1054. πιθοῦ λιποῦσα τόνδʼ ἁμαξήρη θρόνον. Κλυταιμήστρα 1054. Obey thou, leaving this thy car-enthronement! KLUTAIMNESTRA.
4. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 87 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

87. τί φῶ χέουσα τάσδε κηδείους χοάς;
5. Aeschylus, Persians, 206-208, 205 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

205. ὁρῶ δὲ φεύγοντʼ αἰετὸν πρὸς ἐσχάραν 205. But I saw an eagle fleeing for safety to the altar of Phoebus—and out of terror, my friends, I stood speechless. Thereupon I caught sight of a falcon rushing at full speed with outstretched wings and with his talons plucking at the head of the eagle, which did nothing but cower and
6. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 743-750, 752-756, 771-791, 742 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

742. παλαιγενῆ γὰρ λέγω 742. Indeed I speak of the ancient transgression, now swift in its retribution. It remains even into the third generation
7. Aristophanes, Peace, 1018, 1017 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1017. λαβὲ τὴν μάχαιραν: εἶθ' ὅπως μαγειρικῶς
8. Euripides, Alcestis, 12-14, 119 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Electra, 171 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

171. ἀγγέλλει δ' ὅτι νῦν τριταί-
10. Euripides, Orestes, 114 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 155 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

155. Didst consult seers, and gaze into the flame of burnt-offerings? Adrastu
12. Herodotus, Histories, 1.50, 6.81-6.82, 6.108.4, 6.111.2, 7.117, 7.178, 7.189, 7.191, 7.219, 8.54, 8.122 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.50. After this, he tried to win the favor of the Delphian god with great sacrifices. He offered up three thousand beasts from all the kinds fit for sacrifice, and on a great pyre burnt couches covered with gold and silver, golden goblets, and purple cloaks and tunics; by these means he hoped the better to win the aid of the god, to whom he also commanded that every Lydian sacrifice what he could. ,When the sacrifice was over, he melted down a vast store of gold and made ingots of it, the longer sides of which were of six and the shorter of three palms' length, and the height was one palm. There were a hundred and seventeen of these. Four of them were of refined gold, each weighing two talents and a half; the rest were of gold with silver alloy, each of two talents' weight. ,He also had a figure of a lion made of refined gold, weighing ten talents. When the temple of Delphi was burnt, this lion fell from the ingots which were the base on which it stood; and now it is in the treasury of the Corinthians, but weighs only six talents and a half, for the fire melted away three and a half talents. 6.81. Then Cleomenes sent most of his army back to Sparta, while he himself took a thousand of the best warriors and went to the temple of Hera to sacrifice. When he wished to sacrifice at the altar the priest forbade him, saying that it was not holy for a stranger to sacrifice there. Cleomenes ordered the helots to carry the priest away from the altar and whip him, and he performed the sacrifice. After doing this, he returned to Sparta. 6.82. But after his return his enemies brought him before the ephors, saying that he had been bribed not to take Argos when he might have easily taken it. Cleomenes alleged (whether falsely or truly, I cannot rightly say; but this he alleged in his speech) that he had supposed the god's oracle to be fulfilled by his taking of the temple of Argus; therefore he had thought it best not to make any attempt on the city before he had learned from the sacrifices whether the god would deliver it to him or withstand him; ,when he was taking omens in Hera's temple a flame of fire had shone forth from the breast of the image, and so he learned the truth of the matter, that he would not take Argos. If the flame had come out of the head of the image, he would have taken the city from head to foot utterly; but its coming from the breast signified that he had done as much as the god willed to happen. This plea of his seemed to the Spartans to be credible and reasonable, and he far outdistanced the pursuit of his accusers. 6.108.4. So the Lacedaemonians gave this advice to the Plataeans, who did not disobey it. When the Athenians were making sacrifices to the twelve gods, they sat at the altar as suppliants and put themselves under protection. When the Thebans heard this, they marched against the Plataeans, but the Athenians came to their aid. 6.111.2. Ever since that battle, when the Athenians are conducting sacrifices at the festivals every fourth year, the Athenian herald prays for good things for the Athenians and Plataeans together. 7.117. While Xerxes was at Acanthus, it happened that Artachaees, overseer of the digging of the canal, died of an illness. He was high in Xerxes' favor, an Achaemenid by lineage, and the tallest man in Persia, lacking four finger-breadths of five royal cubits in stature, and his voice was the loudest on earth. For this reason Xerxes mourned him greatly and gave him a funeral and burial of great pomp, and the whole army poured libations on his tomb. ,The Acanthians hold Artachaees a hero, and sacrifice to him, calling upon his name. This they do at the command of an oracle. 7.178. So with all speed the Greeks went their several ways to meet the enemy. In the meantime, the Delphians, who were afraid for themselves and for Hellas, consulted the god. They were advised to pray to the winds, for these would be potent allies for Hellas. ,When they had received the oracle, the Delphians first sent word of it to those Greeks who desired to be free; because of their dread of the barbarian, they were forever grateful. Subsequently they erected an altar to the winds at Thyia, the present location of the precinct of Thyia the daughter of Cephisus, and they offered sacrifices to them. This, then, is the reason why the Delphians to this day offer the winds sacrifice of propitiation. 7.189. The story is told that because of an oracle the Athenians invoked Boreas, the north wind, to help them, since another oracle told them to summon their son-in-law as an ally. According to the Hellenic story, Boreas had an Attic wife, Orithyia, the daughter of Erechtheus, ancient king of Athens. ,Because of this connection, so the tale goes, the Athenians considered Boreas to be their son-in-law. They were stationed off Chalcis in Euboea, and when they saw the storm rising, they then, if they had not already, sacrificed to and called upon Boreas and Orithyia to help them by destroying the barbarian fleet, just as before at Athos. ,I cannot say whether this was the cause of Boreas falling upon the barbarians as they lay at anchor, but the Athenians say that he had come to their aid before and that he was the agent this time. When they went home, they founded a sacred precinct of Boreas beside the Ilissus river. 7.191. There was no counting how many grain-ships and other vessels were destroyed. The generals of the fleet were afraid that the Thessalians might attack them now that they had been defeated, so they built a high palisade out of the wreckage. ,The storm lasted three days. Finally the Magi made offerings and cast spells upon the wind, sacrificing also to Thetis and the Nereids. In this way they made the wind stop on the fourth day—or perhaps it died down on its own. They sacrificed to Thetis after hearing from the Ionians the story that it was from this place that Peleus had carried her off and that all the headland of Sepia belonged to her and to the other Nereids. 7.219. The seer Megistias, examining the sacrifices, first told the Hellenes at Thermopylae that death was coming to them with the dawn. Then deserters came who announced the circuit made by the Persians. These gave their signals while it was still night; a third report came from the watchers running down from the heights at dawn. ,The Hellenes then took counsel, but their opinions were divided. Some advised not to leave their post, but others spoke against them. They eventually parted, some departing and dispersing each to their own cities, others preparing to remain there with Leonidas. 8.54. So it was that Xerxes took complete possession of Athens, and he sent a horseman to Susa to announce his present success to Artabanus. On the day after the messenger was sent, he called together the Athenian exiles who accompanied him and asked them go up to the acropolis and perform sacrifices in their customary way, an order given because he had been inspired by a dream or because he felt remorse after burning the sacred precinct. The Athenian exiles did as they were commanded. 8.122. Having sent the first-fruits to Delphi, the Greeks, in the name of the country generally, made inquiry of the god whether the first-fruits which he had received were of full measure and whether he was content. To this he said that he was content with what he had received from all other Greeks, but not from the Aeginetans. From these he demanded the victor's prize for the sea-fight of Salamis. When the Aeginetans learned that, they dedicated three golden stars which are set on a bronze mast, in the angle, nearest to Croesus' bowl.
13. Sophocles, Ajax, 712-713, 220 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Sophocles, Antigone, 1001-1022, 988, 999-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Sophocles, Electra, 1377-1383, 280-281, 637-659, 1376 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 1012-1013, 1016-1020, 1032, 1036, 1068, 1071-1072, 1193-1195, 1207-1210, 1213, 1223-1296, 14, 144-147, 1473, 148-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-189, 19, 190-199, 2, 20, 200-209, 21, 210-215, 22, 223, 273, 288-289, 3-4, 444, 463-499, 5, 500-530, 650-651, 707-708, 857-858, 863-869, 87, 870-879, 88, 880-910, 912-925, 928, 953, 964-972, 976, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 813 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

813. Why do you leave without a word? Do you not know that your silence pleads your accuser’s case? Hyllus:
18. Aeschines, Letters, 3.121 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

19. Menander, Dyscolus, 413-417, 412 (4th cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

20. Plutarch, Alexander The Great, 41.6 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

21. Plutarch, On The Delays of Divine Vengeance, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

22. Achilles Tatius, The Adventures of Leucippe And Cleitophon, 2.15.2-2.15.3 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

23. Chariton, Chaereas And Callirhoe, 6.2.4 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achaeans Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170, 335
actors Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 506
aegina Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
aeschines Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
aeschylus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
agamemnon Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170, 335
ajax Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
alcestis Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 335
alexander the great Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 196
antigone (sophocles), and oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 505, 506
apollo Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144, 170
asclepius Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
athens Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144, 196
atossa Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
audience, theatre Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 569
austen, j. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 569
booth, w.c. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 569
calondas Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
calydon Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
characters, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 505, 506
chorus, antigone, flexible Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 226
chorus, antigone, in danger and safe Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 226
chorus, antigone, oedipus tyrannus Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 226
chorus, antigone, part of 'the large group'" Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 226
cleombrotus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
clytemnestra Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144, 196, 335
coirtiridas Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 335
council, royal Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 505, 506
croesus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
cynics/cynicism Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 49
death Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 49
deianeira Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 503
delphi Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
delphic Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
detienne, m. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 196
dryden, j. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 569
electra Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
epidaurus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
episodes, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 511
eurydice Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 503
fear, of oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 511
furies Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 423
gods (egyptian, greek, and roman), apollon Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 49
gods (egyptian, greek, and roman), zeus Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 49
groups, and individuals Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 226
groups, threatened and safe Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 226
hecuba Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 503
helen Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 196
hera Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
heracles Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
herodotus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
iliad Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 503
intertextuality Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 503
ismene Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 503
jocasta Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 503, 570; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144, 196, 335
kirkwood, g.m. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 569
knox, b.m.w. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 570
laius Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 423
lee, n. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 569
lycian Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170, 196, 335
menander Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 196
messenger, tragic Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 423
mycenae Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
myth, of oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 505
nero Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
odysseus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 505, 506, 511; Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 196
oedipus (euripides) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 505
oedipus rex, chorus Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 226
oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 505, 506, 511
oracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 570
peace (goddess) Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
pergamum Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
persians Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
perspective Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 226
pindar Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 49
plataea Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
plutarch Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 196
polis Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 226
polybus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 570
polytheism Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 49
prophecy/prophet Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 49
prusias Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 196
ritual Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 49
sacrifiant' Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
sequence, mythic, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 505
setting, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 506
seven against thebes (aeschylus), and oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 505
sophocles Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
space, and oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 506
sparta Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170
spectators, text uncertain Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 226
stasima, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 511
structure, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 506, 511
tiresias/teiresias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 570
tiresias Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 170, 335
titans Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
truth Edelmann-Singer et al., Sceptic and Believer in Ancient Mediterranean Religions (2020) 49
trygaeus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144
vernant, j.-p. Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 196
xenophon Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 196
zeus Naiden, Smoke Signals for the Gods: Ancient Greek Sacrifice from the Archaic through Roman Periods (2013) 144, 170, 196