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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10414
Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 387


nanCreon the trustworthy, Creon, my old friend, has crept upon me by stealth, yearning to overthrow me, and has suborned such a scheming juggler as this, a tricky quack, who has eyes only for profit, but is blind in his art!


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

34 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.68-1.70, 1.106, 1.122 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.68. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.69. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose Calchas son of Thestor, far the best of bird-diviners, who knew the things that were, and that were to be, and that had been before 1.70. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.106. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.122. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned
2. Homer, Odyssey, 17.383-17.385 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 900 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

900. θέλξειν μʼ ἔοικας καὶ μεθίσταμαι κότου. Ἀθηνᾶ 900. It seems you will win me by your spells; I am letting go my anger. Athena
4. Antiphanes, Fragments, 152 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

5. Antiphanes, Fragments, 152 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6. Aristophanes, Birds, 1244-1245, 521, 958-991, 1243 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1243. ἄκουσον αὕτη: παῦε τῶν παφλασμάτων:
7. Aristophanes, Knights, 1001-1089, 116-122, 1229, 123, 1230-1239, 124, 1240-1249, 125, 1250-1253, 126-149, 997-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. καὶ νὴ Δί' ἔτι γέ μοὔστι κιβωτὸς πλέα.
8. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 771-776, 770 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

770. ἀλλ' ὁπόταν πτήξωσι χελιδόνες εἰς ἕνα χῶρον
9. Aristophanes, Clouds, 332 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

332. Θουριομάντεις ἰατροτέχνας σφραγιδονυχαργοκομήτας
10. Aristophanes, Peace, 1047, 1052-1126, 1045 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1045. τίς ἄρα ποτ' ἐστίν; ὡς ἀλαζὼν φαίνεται:
11. Aristophanes, Wasps, 380, 160 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

160. ὅταν τις ἐκφύγῃ μ' ἀποσκλῆναι τότε.
12. Euripides, Bacchae, 216-369, 464, 944, 215 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

215. ἔκδημος ὢν μὲν τῆσδʼ ἐτύγχανον χθονός 215. I happened to be at a distance from this land, when I heard of strange evils throughout this city, that the women have left our homes in contrived Bacchic rites, and rush about in the shadowy mountains, honoring with dance
13. Herodotus, Histories, 1.107, 1.120, 1.128, 1.132, 1.140, 7.19, 7.37, 7.43, 7.113, 7.191 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1.107. Afterwards, Cyaxares died after a reign of forty years (among which I count the years of the Scythian domination) and his son Astyages inherited the sovereignty. Astyages had a daughter, whom he called Mandane: he dreamed that she urinated so much that she filled his city and flooded all of Asia . He communicated this vision to those of the Magi who interpreted dreams, and when he heard what they told him he was terrified; ,and presently, when Mandane was of marriageable age, he feared the vision too much to give her to any Mede worthy to marry into his family, but married her to a Persian called Cambyses, a man whom he knew to be wellborn and of a quiet temper: for Astyages held Cambyses to be much lower than a Mede of middle rank. 1.120. Thus Astyages punished Harpagus. But, to help him to decide about Cyrus, he summoned the same Magi who had interpreted his dream as I have said: and when they came, Astyages asked them how they had interpreted his dream. They answered as before, and said that the boy must have been made king had he lived and not died first. ,Then Astyages said, “The boy is safe and alive, and when he was living in the country the boys of his village made him king, and he duly did all that is done by true kings: for he assigned to each individually the roles of bodyguards and sentinels and messengers and everything else, and so ruled. And what do you think is the significance of this?” ,“If the boy is alive,” said the Magi, “and has been made king without premeditation, then be confident on this score and keep an untroubled heart: he will not be made king a second time. Even in our prophecies, it is often but a small thing that has been foretold and the consequences of dreams come to nothing in the end.” ,“I too, Magi,” said Astyages, “am very much of your opinion: that the dream came true when the boy was called king, and that I have no more to fear from him. Nevertheless consider well and advise me what will be safest both for my house and for you.” ,The Magi said, “O King, we too are very anxious that your sovereignty prosper: for otherwise, it passes from your nation to this boy who is a Persian, and so we Medes are enslaved and held of no account by the Persians, as we are of another blood, but while you, our countryman, are established king, we have our share of power, and great honor is shown us by you. ,Thus, then, we ought by all means to watch out for you and for your sovereignty. And if at the present time we saw any danger we would declare everything to you: but now the dream has had a trifling conclusion, and we ourselves are confident and advise you to be so also. As for this boy, send him out of your sight to the Persians and to his parents.” 1.128. Thus the Median army was shamefully scattered. As soon as Astyages heard, he sent a threatening message to Cyrus: “Nevertheless, Cyrus shall not rejoice”; ,and with that he took the Magi who interpreted dreams, who had persuaded him to let Cyrus go free, and impaled them; then he armed the Medes who were left in the city, the very young and very old men. ,Leading these out, and engaging the Persians, he was beaten: Astyages himself was taken prisoner, and lost the Median army which he led. 1.132. And this is their method of sacrifice to the aforesaid gods: when about to sacrifice, they do not build altars or kindle fire, employ libations, or music, or fillets, or barley meal: when a man wishes to sacrifice to one of the gods, he leads a beast to an open space and then, wearing a wreath on his tiara, of myrtle usually, calls on the god. ,To pray for blessings for himself alone is not lawful for the sacrificer; rather, he prays that the king and all the Persians be well; for he reckons himself among them. He then cuts the victim limb from limb into portions, and, after boiling the flesh, spreads the softest grass, trefoil usually, and places all of it on this. ,When he has so arranged it, a Magus comes near and chants over it the song of the birth of the gods, as the Persian tradition relates it; for no sacrifice can be offered without a Magus. Then after a little while the sacrificer carries away the flesh and uses it as he pleases. 1.140. So much I can say of them from my own certain knowledge. But there are other matters concerning the dead which are secretly and obscurely told: how the dead bodies of Persians are not buried before they have been mangled by birds or dogs. ,That this is the way of the Magi, I know for certain; for they do not conceal the practice. But this is certain, that before the Persians bury the body in earth they embalm it in wax. These Magi are as unlike the priests of Egypt as they are unlike all other men: ,for the priests consider it sacrilege to kill anything that lives, except what they sacrifice; but the Magi kill with their own hands every creature, except dogs and men; they kill all alike, ants and snakes, creeping and flying things, and take great pride in it. Leaving this custom to be such as it has been from the first, I return now to my former story. 7.19. Xerxes was now intent on the expedition and then saw a third vision in his sleep, which the Magi interpreted to refer to the whole earth and to signify that all men should be his slaves. This was the vision: Xerxes thought that he was crowned with an olive bough, of which the shoots spread over the whole earth, and then the crown vanished from off his head where it was set. ,The Magi interpreted it in this way, and immediately every single man of the Persians who had been assembled rode away to his own province and there used all zeal to fulfill the kings command, each desiring to receive the promised gifts. Thus it was that Xerxes mustered his army, searching out every part of the continent. 7.37. When the bridges and the work at Athos were ready, and both the dikes at the canal's entrances, built to prevent the surf from silting up the entrances of the dug passage, and the canal itself were reported to be now completely finished, the army then wintered. At the beginning of spring the army made ready and set forth from Sardis to march to Abydos. ,As it was setting out, the sun left his place in the heaven and was invisible, although the sky was without clouds and very clear, and the day turned into night. When Xerxes saw and took note of that, he was concerned and asked the Magi what the vision might signify. ,They declared to him that the god was showing the Greeks the abandonment of their cities; for the sun (they said) was the prophet of the Greeks, as the moon was their own. Xerxes rejoiced exceedingly to hear that and continued on his march. 7.43. When the army had come to the river Scamander, which was the first river after the beginning of their march from Sardis that fell short of their needs and was not sufficient for the army and the cattle to drink—arriving at this river, Xerxes ascended to the citadel of Priam, having a desire to see it. ,After he saw it and asked about everything there, he sacrificed a thousand cattle to Athena of Ilium, and the Magi offered libations to the heroes. After they did this, a panic fell upon the camp in the night. When it was day they journeyed on from there, keeping on their left the cities of Rhoetium and Ophryneum and Dardanus, which borders Abydos, and on their right the Teucrian Gergithae. 7.113. Marching past the Paeonians, Doberes, and Paeoplae, who dwell beyond and northward of the Pangaean mountains, he kept going westwards, until he came to the river Strymon and the city of Eion; its governor was that Boges, then still alive, whom I mentioned just before this. ,All this region about the Pangaean range is called Phyllis; it stretches westwards to the river Angites, which issues into the Strymon, and southwards to the Strymon itself; at this river the Magi sought good omens by sacrificing white horses. 7.191. There was no counting how many grain-ships and other vessels were destroyed. The generals of the fleet were afraid that the Thessalians might attack them now that they had been defeated, so they built a high palisade out of the wreckage. ,The storm lasted three days. Finally the Magi made offerings and cast spells upon the wind, sacrificing also to Thetis and the Nereids. In this way they made the wind stop on the fourth day—or perhaps it died down on its own. They sacrificed to Thetis after hearing from the Ionians the story that it was from this place that Peleus had carried her off and that all the headland of Sepia belonged to her and to the other Nereids.
14. Hippocrates, The Sacred Disease, 1.10 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

15. Plato, Laws, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

909b. or open to bribes, despise men, charming the souls of many of the living, and claiming that they charm the souls of the dead, and promising to persuade the gods by bewitching them, as it were, with sacrifices, prayers and incantations, and who try thus to wreck utterly not only individuals, but whole families and States for the sake of money,—if any of these men be pronounced guilty, the court shall order him to be imprisoned according to law in the mid-country jail
16. Plato, Republic, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

572e. to be repeated in his case. He is drawn toward utter lawlessness, which is called by his seducers complete freedom. His father and his other kin lend support to these compromise appetites while the others lend theirs to the opposite group. And when these dread magi and king-makers come to realize that they have no hope of controlling the youth in any other way, they contrive to engender in his soul a ruling passion to be the protector
17. Sophocles, Antigone, 1001-1090, 115-134, 1348-1349, 135, 1350-1353, 136-154, 631-765, 988-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 101, 1012-1013, 1016-1019, 102, 1020, 103, 1032, 1036, 104-106, 1068, 107, 1071-1072, 110-111, 1129-1131, 1133-1139, 114-115, 1169-1170, 1177-1181, 1184-1185, 1223-1296, 1345-1346, 1382-1384, 139-146, 150, 154, 158-200, 223, 227-229, 236-243, 273, 284-289, 298-304, 307, 310, 312-313, 316-317, 320-321, 324-386, 388-403, 405, 408-425, 429-444, 448-462, 532-630, 709, 711-712, 85, 863-869, 87, 870-872, 88, 882-883, 91-92, 946, 95, 953, 96, 964-969, 97, 970-972, 976, 98-100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 538, 552-553, 555-581, 584-587, 623, 629-630, 537 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

537. and partly to grieve over my sufferings in your company. I have received a maiden—or, I believe, no longer a maiden, but an experienced woman—into my home, just as a mariner takes on cargo, a merchandise to wreck my peace of mind. And now we are two, a pair waiting under
20. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 8.1.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

8.1.1. Such were the events in Sicily . When the news was brought to Athens, for a long while they disbelieved even the most respectable of the soldiers who had themselves escaped from the scene of action and clearly reported the matter, a destruction so complete not being thought credible. When the conviction was forced upon them, they were angry with the orators who had joined in promoting the expedition, just as if they had not themselves voted it, and were enraged also with the reciters of oracles and soothsayers, and all other omenmongers of the time who had encouraged them to hope that they should conquer Sicily .
21. Xenophon, Hellenica, 4.5.13-4.5.14 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

4.5.13. But those in the city of the Corinthians, both Callias, the son of Hipponicus, commander of the Athenian hoplites, and Iphicrates, leader of the peltasts, when they descried the Lacedaemonians and saw that they were not only few in number, but also unaccompanied by either peltasts or cavalry, thought that it was safe to attack them with their force of peltasts. For if they should proceed along the road, they could be attacked with javelins on their unprotected side and destroyed; and if they should undertake to pursue, they with their peltasts, the nimblest of all troops, could easily escape the hoplites. 4.5.14. Having come to this conclusion, they led forth their troops. And Callias formed his hoplites in line of battle not far from the city, while Iphicrates with his peltasts attacked the Lacedaemonian regiment. Now when the Lacedaemonians 390 B.C. were being attacked with javelins, and several men had been wounded and several others slain, they directed the shield-bearers Slaves who carried the shields of the hoplites. to take up these wounded men and carry them back to Lechaeum; and these were the only men in the regiment who were really saved. i.e., saved both in life and in honour. Then the polemarch ordered the first ten year-classes See note on II. iv. 32. to drive off their assailants.
22. Aeschines, Letters, 3.137 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

23. Aristotle, Politics, None (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

24. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.259-18.260 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

25. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 12.10.3-12.10.4 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

12.10.3.  And shortly thereafter the city was moved to another site and received another name, its founders being Lampon and Xenocritus; the circumstances of its founding were as follows. The Sybarites who were driven a second time from their native city dispatched ambassadors to Greece, to the Lacedaemonians and Athenians, requesting that they assist their repatriation and take part in the settlement. 12.10.4.  Now the Lacedaemonians paid no attention to them, but the Athenians promised to join in the enterprise, and they manned ten ships and sent them to the Sybarites under the leadership of Lampon and Xenocritus; they further sent word to the several cities of the Peloponnesus, offering a share in the colony to anyone who wished to take part in it.
26. Plutarch, On The Obsolescence of Oracles, None (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

417c. in which it is possible to gain the clearest reflections and adumbrations of the truth about the demigods, 'let my lips be piously sealed,' as Herodotus says; but as for festivals and sacrifices, which may be compared with ill-omened and gloomy days, in which occur the eating of raw flesh, rending of victims, fasting, and beating of breasts, and again in many places scurrilous language at the shrines, and Frenzy and shouting of throngs in excitement With tumultuous tossing of heads in the air, Ishould say that these acts are not performed for any god, but are soothing and appeasing rites for the averting of evil spirits. Nor is it credible that the gods demanded or welcomed the human sacrifices of ancient days
27. Plutarch, Pericles, 6.2, 32.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

6.2. A story is told that once on a time the head of a one-horned ram was brought to Pericles from his country-place, and that Lampon the seer, when he saw how the horn grew strong and solid from the middle of the forehead, declared that, whereas there were two powerful parties in the city, that of Thucydides and that of Pericles, the mastery would finally devolve upon one man,—the man to whom this sign had been given. Anaxagoras, however, had the skull cut in two, and showed that the brain had not filled out its position, but had drawn together to a point, like an egg, at that particular spot in the entire cavity where the root of the horn began. 32.2. The people accepted with delight these slanders, and so, while they were in this mood, a bill was passed, on motion of Dracontides, that Pericles should deposit his accounts of public moneys with the prytanes, and that the jurors should decide upon his case with ballots which had lain upon the altar of the goddess on the acropolis. But Hagnon amended this clause of the bill with the motion that the case be tried before fifteen hundred jurors in the ordinary way, whether one wanted to call it a prosecution for embezzlement and bribery, or malversation.
28. Seneca The Younger, Hercules Oetaeus, 486-538, 567-582, 485 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

29. Seneca The Younger, Oedipus, 216, 233-238, 286, 418, 509, 697-708, 838-881, 915-979, 212 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

30. Porphyry, On Abstinence, 2.37 (3rd cent. CE - 4th cent. CE)

2.37. 37.The first God being incorporeal, immoveable, and impartible, and neither subsisting in any thing, nor restrained in his energies, is not, as has been before observed, in want of any thing external to himself, as neither is the soul of the world; but this latter, containing in itself the principle of that which is triply divisible, and being naturally self-motive, is adapted to be moved in a beautiful and orderly manner, and also to move the body of the world, according to the most excellent reasons [i.e. productive principles or powers]. It is, however, connected with and comprehends body, though it is itself incorporeal, and liberated from the participation of any passion. To the remaining Gods, therefore, to the world, to the inerratic and erratic stars, who are visible Gods, consisting of soul and body, thanks are to be returned after the above-mentioned manner, through sacrifices from iimate natures. The multitude, therefore, of those invisible beings remains for us, whom Plato indiscriminately calls daemons 17; but of these, some being denominated by men, obtain from them honours, and other religious observances, similar to those which are paid to the Gods; but others, who for the most part are not explicitly denominated, receive an occult religious reverence and appellation from certain persons in villages and certain cities; and the remaining multitude is called in common by the |67 name of daemons. The general persuasion, however, respecting all these invisible beings, is this, that if they become angry through being neglected, and deprived of the religious reverence which is due to them, they are noxious to those by whom they are thus neglected, and that they again become beneficent, if they are appeased by prayers, supplications, and sacrifices, and other similar rites. SPAN
31. Aeschines, Or., 3.137

32. Anon., Scholia Aristophanem Nubes, 332

33. Epigraphy, Lscg, 154

34. Epigraphy, Lss, 115



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agersikybelis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62, 316
agoracritus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
agōn scene Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
ajax, and agōn scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
ajax (sophocles), and agōn scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
ajax (sophocles), seer in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
amphiaraus Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 118
anagnos Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180
anger, and agōn scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
antigone (sophocles), a seer in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
antigone (sophocles), and agōn scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
antigone (sophocles), and oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
antigone (sophocles), and seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
apollo Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 98
archives Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
aristophanes, birds Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
aristophanes, on hierokles and lampon Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
aristophanes Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
athena Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 98
athens, athenian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
athens and athenians, and drama Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
athens and athenians, and religious authority Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62, 316
athens and athenians, attitudes of, toward asiatics Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
athens and athenians, cults and cult places of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
athens and athenians, in peloponnesian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62, 316
athens and athenians, in persian war era Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
audience, theatre Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 98
azande people, sudan, poison oracle Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
barathron Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
cakes (offerings) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
calchas, as the voice of the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
callias son of hipponicus (younger) Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
cerri, giovanni Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
charlatans Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
comedy Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
council house, of athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
cratinus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62, 316
creon, and agōn scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
creon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 98
critias, sisyphus Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
critias Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
croesus, fall of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
curse (ara), self-curse Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 181
cybele Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
daidouchos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
daimons Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
darius i Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
demeter Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
derveni author Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
dialogue, and agōn scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
dionysos, dionysos as foreign god Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317; Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
diopeithes Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
discoverer (heuretês), first Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
discovery Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
divination Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
divine punishment/retribution Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180
eagle Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
eleusis Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
episodes, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
erinyes Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
eudaimonia, rooted in thinking in sophocles Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180, 181
eumenides Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
expiation Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
first inventor" Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
foucart, paul Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
general parodos, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
god, belief in Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
gods, and humans Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
haemon, and agōn scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
hagneia, as a divine law Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180, 181
hagneia, of words Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180
hercules on oeta (seneca) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
herodotus, ethnic perspectives of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
herodotus, historical perspective of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
herodotus, religious perspective of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
hierarchy of means Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
hierocles Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
hierokles Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
hippocrates, works, sacred disease Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
hippocratic authors Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
homer Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
humans, and the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
hymn, to reverent purity Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180, 181
incest Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 181
incompetence, in medicine Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
information, from the outside, by seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
initiates Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
initiation, initiatory rites Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
interpreters, of the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
iranian priests Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
jocasta (epicaste), and tiresias Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
katharmos Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180
kybebe Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62, 316
kybebos Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62, 316
kybele Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
laius Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 98
lampon Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
libations Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
loimos Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180
lydia, lydian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
lydia and lydians, and phrygian symbols Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
lydia and lydians, rites of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
magic Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
magicians Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
magos Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
mantis, battle participation of manteis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 118
mantis, elucidation of past Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 118
mantis Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 118
maps, ionian Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
melampus, melampids Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 118
menelaus, and agōn scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
metragyrtes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62, 316
metroön, at athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
miastor Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180
mother of the gods, and athens Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62, 316
mother of the gods, and persians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
mother of the gods, as lydian kybebe Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
mother of the gods, in attic drama Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62, 316
mother of the gods, rites of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
mother of the gods, scholarship on Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
mother of the gods, statues and images of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
mountebanks Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
mysteries, profanation of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
nilsson, martin Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
oedipus, and agōn scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
oedipus, and tiresias Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
oedipus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317; Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 118; Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62, 316; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180, 181
oedipus the king (sophocles), and agōn scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
oedipus the king (sophocles), and seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
oedipus the king (sophocles), seer in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
onchestos, boiotia Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
oracle, challenges to Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
oracles Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
paian/paean Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 98
past, the, and oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
peloponnesian war Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
pentheus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
pericles Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
persia and persians, customs of Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
philter, from deianira Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
phren/phrenes, seat of purity/impurity, in the antigone Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180
phrygia and phrygians, as stereotype Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
plague Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
plato Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
plutarch Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
poseidon, sanctuary at onchestos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
prayer, chorus in oedipus tyrannus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180, 181
priest, priesthood Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
prodicus Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 162
professionals, of the sacred Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
prophet, prophetic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
prophet Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
punishments Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
purity, of the leader Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 181
religion Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
rite, ritual' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
rites, rituals Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
sacred Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
sacred regulations (inscriptional) Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 181
sacrifices Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
seers, challenges to Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
segal, c. p. Pucci, Euripides' Revolution Under Cover: An Essay (2016) 162
servants of the gods (minor deities) Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
sicily and sicilians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
socrates Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
soothsayer Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
sophocles, works, oedipus rex Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
sophocles Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180, 181
souls Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
structure, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
teiresias Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 181
teucer, and agōn scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 317
thebes Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 180
thrace and thracians Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62
tiresias, and agōn scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 285
tiresias, challenges to Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
tiresias/teiresias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 98
tiresias Johnston, Ancient Greek Divination (2008) 118; Jouanna, Greek Medicine from Hippocrates to Galen (2012) 102
tragedy Edmonds, Drawing Down the Moon: Magic in the Ancient Greco-Roman World (2019) 231
tyrannus Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 62, 316
underworld Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35
women of trachis, the (sophocles), and seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
xerxes Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
zeus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 98; Munn, The Mother of the Gods, Athens, and the Tyranny of Asia: A Study of Sovereignty in Ancient Religion (2006) 316
μάγοι Alvarez, The Derveni Papyrus: Unearthing Ancient Mysteries (2018) 35