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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10414
Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 298-304


nanBut there is no one to convict him. But here they bring at last the godlike prophet, the only man in whom truth lives. Teiresias enters, led by a boy. Oedipu


nanBut there is no one to convict him. But here they bring at last the godlike prophet, the only man in whom truth lives. Teiresias enters, led by a boy. Oedipu


nanBut none has seen the man who saw him fall. CHORUS: Well, if he knows what fear is, he will quail And flee before the terror of thy curse. OIDIPUS:Words scare not him who blenches not at deeds. CHORUS: But here is one to arraign him. Lo, at length They bring the god-inspired seer in whom Above all other men is truth inborn. [Enter TEIRESIAS, led by a boy.] OIDIPUS: Teiresias, seer who comprehendest all, Lore of the wise and hidden mysteries, High things of heaven and low things of the earth, Thou knowest, though thy blinded eyes see naught, What plague infects our city; and we turn To thee, O seer, our one defense and shield. The purport of the answer that the God Returned to us who sought his oracle, The messengers have doubtless told thee — how One course alone could rid us of the pest, To find the murderers of Laius, And slay them or expel them from the land.


nanTeiresias, whose soul grasps all things, both that which may be told and that which is unspeakable, the Olympian secrets and the affairs of the earth, you feel, though you cannot see, what a huge plague haunts our state. From which, great prophet, we find you to be our protector and only savior.


nanTeiresias, whose soul grasps all things, both that which may be told and that which is unspeakable, the Olympian secrets and the affairs of the earth, you feel, though you cannot see, what a huge plague haunts our state. From which, great prophet, we find you to be our protector and only savior.


nanTeiresias, whose soul grasps all things, both that which may be told and that which is unspeakable, the Olympian secrets and the affairs of the earth, you feel, though you cannot see, what a huge plague haunts our state. From which, great prophet, we find you to be our protector and only savior.


nanTeiresias, whose soul grasps all things, both that which may be told and that which is unspeakable, the Olympian secrets and the affairs of the earth, you feel, though you cannot see, what a huge plague haunts our state. From which, great prophet, we find you to be our protector and only savior.


nanTeiresias, whose soul grasps all things, both that which may be told and that which is unspeakable, the Olympian secrets and the affairs of the earth, you feel, though you cannot see, what a huge plague haunts our state. From which, great prophet, we find you to be our protector and only savior.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

27 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.72, 2.353 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.72. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 2.353. /For I declare that Cronos' son, supreme in might, gave promise with his nod on that day when the Argives went on board their swift-faring ships, bearing unto the Trojans death and fate; for he lightened on our right and shewed forth signs of good. Wherefore let no man make haste to depart homewards until each have lain with the wife of some Trojan
2. Homer, Odyssey, 15.251-15.253 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Xenophanes, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Aristophanes, Birds, 959-991, 521 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

521. Λάμπων δ' ὄμνυς' ἔτι καὶ νυνὶ τὸν χῆν', ὅταν ἐξαπατᾷ τι.
7. Aristophanes, Knights, 1001-1089, 116-122, 1229, 123, 1230-1239, 124, 1240-1249, 125, 1250-1253, 126-149, 997-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1000. καὶ νὴ Δί' ἔτι γέ μοὔστι κιβωτὸς πλέα.
8. Aristophanes, Lysistrata, 771-776, 770 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

770. ἀλλ' ὁπόταν πτήξωσι χελιδόνες εἰς ἕνα χῶρον
9. Aristophanes, Clouds, 332 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

332. Θουριομάντεις ἰατροτέχνας σφραγιδονυχαργοκομήτας
10. Aristophanes, Peace, 1047, 1052-1126, 1045 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1045. τίς ἄρα ποτ' ἐστίν; ὡς ἀλαζὼν φαίνεται:
11. Aristophanes, Wasps, 380, 160 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

160. ὅταν τις ἐκφύγῃ μ' ἀποσκλῆναι τότε.
12. Plato, Laches, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

195e. Lach. I do: it seems to be the seers whom he calls the courageous: for who else can know for which of us it is better to be alive than dead? And yet, Nicias, do you avow yourself to be a seer, or to be neither a seer nor courageous? Nic. What! Is it now a seer, think you, who has the gift of judging what is to be dreaded and what to be dared? Lach. That is my view: who else could it be? Nic. Much rather the man of whom I speak, my dear sir: for the seer’s business is to judge only the signs of what is yet to come—whether a man is to meet with death or disease or loss of property
13. Sophocles, Antigone, 1001-1090, 115-154, 988-990, 992-993, 997-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 101, 1012-1013, 1016-1019, 102, 1020, 103, 1032, 1036, 104-106, 1068, 107, 1071-1072, 110-111, 1129-1131, 1133-1139, 114-115, 1169-1170, 1177-1181, 1184-1185, 1223-1296, 139-146, 223, 227-229, 236-243, 273, 284-289, 299-304, 307, 312-313, 316-317, 320-321, 324-403, 405, 408-425, 429-444, 452-453, 455, 484, 496-501, 532-630, 85, 87-88, 91-92, 95, 953, 96, 964-969, 97, 970-972, 976, 98-100 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 538, 552-553, 555-581, 584-587, 623, 629-630, 537 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

537. and partly to grieve over my sufferings in your company. I have received a maiden—or, I believe, no longer a maiden, but an experienced woman—into my home, just as a mariner takes on cargo, a merchandise to wreck my peace of mind. And now we are two, a pair waiting under
16. Xenophon, The Persian Expedition, 5.6.29, 6.1.31 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

6.1.31. Then Xenophon, seeing that something more was needed, came forward and spoke again: Well, soldiers, he said, that you may understand the matter fully I swear to you by all the gods and goddesses that in very truth, so soon as I became aware of your intention, I offered sacrifices to learn whether it was best for you to entrust to me this command and for me to undertake it; and the gods gave me such signs in the sacrifices that even a layman could perceive that I must withhold myself from accepting the sole command.
17. Xenophon, On Horsemanship, 9.9 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

18. Xenophon, Hellenica, 2.4.18-2.4.19 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.4.18. After saying these words and turning about to face the enemy, he kept quiet; for the seer bade them not to attack until one of their own number was either killed or wounded. But as soon as that happens, he said, we shall lead on, and to you who follow will come victory, but death, methinks, to me. 2.4.19. And his saying did not prove false, for when they had taken up their shields, he, as though led on by a kind of fate, leaped forth first of all, fell upon the enemy, and was slain, and he lies buried at the ford of the Cephisus; but the others were victorious, and pursued the enemy as far as the level ground. In this battle fell two of the Thirty, Critias and Hippomachus, one of the Ten who ruled in Piraeus, Charmides, the son of Glaucon, and about seventy of the others. And the victors took possession of their arms, but they did not strip off the tunic Worn underneath the breastplate. The victors, then, appropriated the arms and armour of the dead, but not their clothing. of any citizen. When this had been done and while they were giving back the bodies of the dead, many on either side mingled and talked with one another.
19. Xenophon, The Education of Cyrus, 1.6.2, 1.6.46 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.6.2. My son, it is evident both from the sacrifices and from the signs from the skies that the gods are sending you forth with their grace and favour; and you yourself must recognize it, for I had you taught this art on purpose that you might not have to learn the counsels of the gods through others as interpreters, but that you yourself, both seeing what is to be seen and hearing what is to be heard, might understand; for I would not have you at the mercy of the soothsayers, in case they should wish to deceive you by saying other things than those revealed by the gods; and furthermore, if ever you should be without a soothsayer, I would not have you in doubt as to what to make of the divine revelations, but by your soothsayer’s art I would have you understand the counsels of the gods and obey them.
20. Xenophon, Memoirs, 1.1.9 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.1.9. If any man thinks that these matters are wholly within the grasp of the human mind and nothing in them is beyond our reason, that man, he said, is irrational. But it is no less irrational to seek the guidance of heaven in matters which men are permitted by the gods to decide for themselves by study: to ask, for instance, Is it better to get an experienced coachman to drive my carriage or a man without experience? Cyropaedia I. vi. 6. Is it better to get an experienced seaman to steer my ship or a man without experience? So too with what we may know by reckoning, measurement or weighing. To put such questions to the gods seemed to his mind profane. In short, what the gods have granted us to do by help of learning, we must learn; what is hidden from mortals we should try to find out from the gods by divination: for to him that is in their grace the gods grant a sign.
21. Cicero, On Divination, 1.5.9 (2nd cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

22. Plutarch, Pericles, 32.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

32.2. The people accepted with delight these slanders, and so, while they were in this mood, a bill was passed, on motion of Dracontides, that Pericles should deposit his accounts of public moneys with the prytanes, and that the jurors should decide upon his case with ballots which had lain upon the altar of the goddess on the acropolis. But Hagnon amended this clause of the bill with the motion that the case be tried before fifteen hundred jurors in the ordinary way, whether one wanted to call it a prosecution for embezzlement and bribery, or malversation.
23. Seneca The Younger, Hercules Oetaeus, 486-538, 567-582, 485 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

24. Seneca The Younger, Oedipus, 216, 233-238, 286, 418, 509, 697-708, 838-881, 915-979, 212 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)

25. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.34.4, 6.17.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.34.4. The Oropians have near the temple a spring, which they call the Spring of Amphiaraus; they neither sacrifice into it nor are wont to use it for purifications or for lustral water. But when a man has been cured of a disease through a response the custom is to throw silver and coined gold into the spring, for by this way they say that Amphiaraus rose up after he had become a god. Iophon the Cnossian, a guide, produced responses in hexameter verse, saying that Amphiaraus gave them to the Argives who were sent against Thebes . These verses unrestrainedly appealed to popular taste. Except those whom they say Apollo inspired of old none of the seers uttered oracles, but they were good at explaining dreams and interpreting the flights of birds and the entrails of victims. 6.17.6. That he was the soothsayer of the clan of the Clytidae, Eperastus declares at the end of the inscription: of the stock of the sacred-tongued Clytidae I boast to be, Their soothsayer, the scion of the god-like Melampodidae. For Mantius was a son of Melampus, the son of Amythaon, and he had a son Oicles, while Clytius was a son of Alcmaeon, the son of Amphiaraus, the son of Oicles. Clytius was the son of Alcmaeon by the daughter of Phegeus, and he migrated to Elis because he shrank from living with his mother's brothers, knowing that they had compassed the murder of Alcmaeon.
26. Sextus, Outlines of Pyrrhonism, 1.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

27. Augustine, The City of God, 7.17 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

7.17. And the same is true with respect to all the rest, as is true with respect to those things which I have mentioned for the sake of example. They do not explain them, but rather involve them. They rush hither and there, to this side or to that, according as they are driven by the impulse of erratic opinion; so that even Varro himself has chosen rather to doubt concerning all things, than to affirm anything. For, having written the first of the three last books concerning the certain gods, and having commenced in the second of these to speak of the uncertain gods, he says: I ought not to be censured for having stated in this book the doubtful opinions concerning the gods. For he who, when he has read them, shall think that they both ought to be, and can be, conclusively judged of, will do so himself. For my own part, I can be more easily led to doubt the things which I have written in the first book, than to attempt to reduce all the things I shall write in this one to any orderly system. Thus he makes uncertain not only that book concerning the uncertain gods, but also that other concerning the certain gods. Moreover, in that third book concerning the select gods, after having exhibited by anticipation as much of the natural theology as he deemed necessary, and when about to commence to speak of the vanities and lying insanities of the civil theology, where he was not only without the guidance of the truth of things, but was also pressed by the authority of tradition, he says: I will write in this book concerning the public gods of the Roman people, to whom they have dedicated temples, and whom they have conspicuously distinguished by many adornments; but, as Xenophon of Colophon writes, I will state what I think, not what I am prepared to maintain: it is for man to think those things, for God to know them. It is not, then, an account of things comprehended and most certainly believed which he promised, when about to write those things which were instituted by men. He only timidly promises an account of things which are but the subject of doubtful opinion. Nor, indeed, was it possible for him to affirm with the same certainty that Janus was the world, and such like things; or to discover with the same certainty such things as how Jupiter was the son of Saturn, while Saturn was made subject to him as king:- he could, I say, neither affirm nor discover such things with the same certainty with which he knew such things as that the world existed, that the heavens and earth existed, the heavens bright with stars, and the earth fertile through seeds; or with the same perfect conviction with which he believed that this universal mass of nature is governed and administered by a certain invisible and mighty force.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agyrtes Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 118
alcmaeon Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
antigone (sophocles), a seer in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
antigone (sophocles), and oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
antigone (sophocles), and seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
apollo Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110, 115
aristophanes, on hierokles and lampon Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
azande people, sudan, poison oracle Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
calchas Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
cicero, on divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
diopeithes Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
divination, and approximation to the divine Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110, 115
divination, and knowledge-claims Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
divination, as conjectural Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
divination, by signs Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
divination, mantic families Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
divination, not admitted in court individuals Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 118
divination, practised by amateurs Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110, 115
episodes, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
error, human Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
general parodos, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
gods, and humans Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
hercules on oeta (seneca) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
hierokles Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
homer, on divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110, 115
humans, and the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
iliad (homer), and seers Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
information, from the outside, by seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
lampon Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
manteis Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 118
manteis advise individuals Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 118
manteis suspicion of Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 118
oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
oedipus the king (sophocles), and seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
oedipus the king (sophocles), seer in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
onchestos, boiotia Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
oracle, veracity of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
oracle, vs. seers Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
oracles, consultation of by individuals Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 118
past, the, and oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
philter, from deianira Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
poseidon, sanctuary at onchestos Eidinow, Oracles, Curses, and Risk Among the Ancient Greeks (2007) 258
rationality, in divination' Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
recognition, of fulfillment Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
seers, veracity of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
seers, vs. oracles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
sophocles Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
sophocles abuse of manteis in Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 118
stoicism, teiresias Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110, 115
structure, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
tiresias, and apollo Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
tiresias Parker, Polytheism and Society at Athens (2005) 118
veracity, of seers and oracles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 380
women of trachis, the (sophocles), and seneca Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 763
xenophanes, his attitude to divine disclosure, his attitude to divine disclosure Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110, 115
xenophanes, on knowledge Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 115
xenophon, on divination Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110
zeus Tor, Mortal and Divine in Early Greek Epistemology (2017) 110