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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10413
Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 720-1043


nanBut you are not just; you are one who considers it a fine thing to utter every sort of word, both those which are sanctioned and those which are forbidden—such are your taunts against me in the presence of these men. And to you it seems a fine thing to flatter the renowned Theseus, and Athens , saying how well it is governed.


nanBut you are not just; you are one who considers it a fine thing to utter every sort of word, both those which are sanctioned and those which are forbidden—such are your taunts against me in the presence of these men. And to you it seems a fine thing to flatter the renowned Theseus, and Athens , saying how well it is governed.


nanBut you are not just; you are one who considers it a fine thing to utter every sort of word, both those which are sanctioned and those which are forbidden—such are your taunts against me in the presence of these men. And to you it seems a fine thing to flatter the renowned Theseus, and Athens , saying how well it is governed.


nanBut you are not just; you are one who considers it a fine thing to utter every sort of word, both those which are sanctioned and those which are forbidden—such are your taunts against me in the presence of these men. And to you it seems a fine thing to flatter the renowned Theseus, and Athens , saying how well it is governed.


nanBut you are not just; you are one who considers it a fine thing to utter every sort of word, both those which are sanctioned and those which are forbidden—such are your taunts against me in the presence of these men. And to you it seems a fine thing to flatter the renowned Theseus, and Athens , saying how well it is governed.


nanYet while giving such generous praise, you forget that if any land knows how to worship the gods with honors, this land excels in that. It is from her that you had planned to steal me, a suppliant and an old man, and tried to seize me, having already carried off my daughters.


nanYet while giving such generous praise, you forget that if any land knows how to worship the gods with honors, this land excels in that. It is from her that you had planned to steal me, a suppliant and an old man, and tried to seize me, having already carried off my daughters.


nanYet while giving such generous praise, you forget that if any land knows how to worship the gods with honors, this land excels in that. It is from her that you had planned to steal me, a suppliant and an old man, and tried to seize me, having already carried off my daughters.


nanYet while giving such generous praise, you forget that if any land knows how to worship the gods with honors, this land excels in that. It is from her that you had planned to steal me, a suppliant and an old man, and tried to seize me, having already carried off my daughters.


nanYet while giving such generous praise, you forget that if any land knows how to worship the gods with honors, this land excels in that. It is from her that you had planned to steal me, a suppliant and an old man, and tried to seize me, having already carried off my daughters.


nanTherefore I now call on the goddesses here, I supplicate them, I beseech them with prayers, to bring me help and to fight on my behalf, that you may learn well what kind of men this city is guarded by. Choru


nanTherefore I now call on the goddesses here, I supplicate them, I beseech them with prayers, to bring me help and to fight on my behalf, that you may learn well what kind of men this city is guarded by. Choru


nanTherefore I now call on the goddesses here, I supplicate them, I beseech them with prayers, to bring me help and to fight on my behalf, that you may learn well what kind of men this city is guarded by. Choru


nanTherefore I now call on the goddesses here, I supplicate them, I beseech them with prayers, to bring me help and to fight on my behalf, that you may learn well what kind of men this city is guarded by. Choru


nanThe stranger is a good man, lord.


nanHis fate has been accursed, but it is worthy of our aid. Theseu


nanEnough of words. The doers of the deed are in flight, while we, the sufferers, stand still. Creon


nanEnough of words. The doers of the deed are in flight, while we, the sufferers, stand still. Creon


nanWhat order, then, do you have for a powerless man? Theseu


nanGuide the way on the path to them while I escort you


nanin order that if you are keeping the maidens whom we seek in these lands, you yourself may reveal them to me. But if your men are fleeing with the spoils in their grasp, we may spare our trouble; the chase is for others, from whom they will never escape out of this land to thank their gods.


nanin order that if you are keeping the maidens whom we seek in these lands, you yourself may reveal them to me. But if your men are fleeing with the spoils in their grasp, we may spare our trouble; the chase is for others, from whom they will never escape out of this land to thank their gods.


nanin order that if you are keeping the maidens whom we seek in these lands, you yourself may reveal them to me. But if your men are fleeing with the spoils in their grasp, we may spare our trouble; the chase is for others, from whom they will never escape out of this land to thank their gods.


nanin order that if you are keeping the maidens whom we seek in these lands, you yourself may reveal them to me. But if your men are fleeing with the spoils in their grasp, we may spare our trouble; the chase is for others, from whom they will never escape out of this land to thank their gods.


nanin order that if you are keeping the maidens whom we seek in these lands, you yourself may reveal them to me. But if your men are fleeing with the spoils in their grasp, we may spare our trouble; the chase is for others, from whom they will never escape out of this land to thank their gods.


nanCome, lead the way! And know that the captor has been captured; fate has seized you as you hunted. Gains unjustly got by guile are soon lost. And you will have no ally in your purpose; for I well know that it is not without accomplice or resource that you have come to such


nanCome, lead the way! And know that the captor has been captured; fate has seized you as you hunted. Gains unjustly got by guile are soon lost. And you will have no ally in your purpose; for I well know that it is not without accomplice or resource that you have come to such


nanCome, lead the way! And know that the captor has been captured; fate has seized you as you hunted. Gains unjustly got by guile are soon lost. And you will have no ally in your purpose; for I well know that it is not without accomplice or resource that you have come to such


nanCome, lead the way! And know that the captor has been captured; fate has seized you as you hunted. Gains unjustly got by guile are soon lost. And you will have no ally in your purpose; for I well know that it is not without accomplice or resource that you have come to such


nanCome, lead the way! And know that the captor has been captured; fate has seized you as you hunted. Gains unjustly got by guile are soon lost. And you will have no ally in your purpose; for I well know that it is not without accomplice or resource that you have come to such


nanoutrage, from the daring mood which has inspired you here. There was someone you were trusting in when you did these deeds. This I must consider, and I must not make this city weaker than one man. Do you take my drift?


nanoutrage, from the daring mood which has inspired you here. There was someone you were trusting in when you did these deeds. This I must consider, and I must not make this city weaker than one man. Do you take my drift?


nanoutrage, from the daring mood which has inspired you here. There was someone you were trusting in when you did these deeds. This I must consider, and I must not make this city weaker than one man. Do you take my drift?


nanoutrage, from the daring mood which has inspired you here. There was someone you were trusting in when you did these deeds. This I must consider, and I must not make this city weaker than one man. Do you take my drift?


nanoutrage, from the daring mood which has inspired you here. There was someone you were trusting in when you did these deeds. This I must consider, and I must not make this city weaker than one man. Do you take my drift?


nanOr do these words seem as empty as the warnings given when you were laying your plans? Creon


nanSay what you wish while you are here; I will not object. But at home I too will know how to act. Theseu


nanSay what you wish while you are here; I will not object. But at home I too will know how to act. Theseu


nanMake your threats, then, but go forward. As for you, Oedipus, stay here in peace with my pledge that, unless I die beforehand


nanMake your threats, then, but go forward. As for you, Oedipus, stay here in peace with my pledge that, unless I die beforehand


nanI will not cease until I put you in possession of your children. Oedipu


nanI will not cease until I put you in possession of your children. Oedipu


nanThanks to you, Theseus, for your nobleness and your righteous care for me! Theseus exits with attendants and Creon. Choru


nanThanks to you, Theseus, for your nobleness and your righteous care for me! Theseus exits with attendants and Creon. Choru


nanLand that is praised above all lands, now it is your task to make those bright praises seen in deeds! Oedipu


nanLand that is praised above all lands, now it is your task to make those bright praises seen in deeds! Oedipu


nanLand that is praised above all lands, now it is your task to make those bright praises seen in deeds! Oedipu


nanLand that is praised above all lands, now it is your task to make those bright praises seen in deeds! Oedipu


nanAh, dearest old men, now give me


nanthe final proof of my salvation! Choru


nanCourage! It will be yours. For even if I am aged, this country’s strength has not grown old. Enter Creon, with attendants. Creon


nanCourage! It will be yours. For even if I am aged, this country’s strength has not grown old. Enter Creon, with attendants. Creon


nanGentlemen, noble dwellers in this land, I see from your eyes that a sudden fear has troubled you at my coming;


nanGentlemen, noble dwellers in this land, I see from your eyes that a sudden fear has troubled you at my coming;


nanbut do not shrink back from me, and let no evil word escape you. I am here with no thought of force; I am old, and I know that the city to which I have come is mighty, if any in Hellas has might.


nanbut do not shrink back from me, and let no evil word escape you. I am here with no thought of force; I am old, and I know that the city to which I have come is mighty, if any in Hellas has might.


nanbut do not shrink back from me, and let no evil word escape you. I am here with no thought of force; I am old, and I know that the city to which I have come is mighty, if any in Hellas has might.


nanbut do not shrink back from me, and let no evil word escape you. I am here with no thought of force; I am old, and I know that the city to which I have come is mighty, if any in Hellas has might.


nanbut do not shrink back from me, and let no evil word escape you. I am here with no thought of force; I am old, and I know that the city to which I have come is mighty, if any in Hellas has might.


nanNo, I have been sent, aged as I am, to plead with this man to return with me to the land of Cadmus. I am not one man’s envoy, but have a mandate from all our people; since it belonged to me, by family, beyond all other Thebans to mourn his woes.


nanNo, I have been sent, aged as I am, to plead with this man to return with me to the land of Cadmus. I am not one man’s envoy, but have a mandate from all our people; since it belonged to me, by family, beyond all other Thebans to mourn his woes.


nanNo, I have been sent, aged as I am, to plead with this man to return with me to the land of Cadmus. I am not one man’s envoy, but have a mandate from all our people; since it belonged to me, by family, beyond all other Thebans to mourn his woes.


nanNo, I have been sent, aged as I am, to plead with this man to return with me to the land of Cadmus. I am not one man’s envoy, but have a mandate from all our people; since it belonged to me, by family, beyond all other Thebans to mourn his woes.


nanNo, I have been sent, aged as I am, to plead with this man to return with me to the land of Cadmus. I am not one man’s envoy, but have a mandate from all our people; since it belonged to me, by family, beyond all other Thebans to mourn his woes.


nanUnhappy Oedipus, hear us, and come home! Justly are you summoned by all the Cadmeans, and most of all by me, since I—unless I am the worst of all men born—feel most sorrow for your woes, old man


nanUnhappy Oedipus, hear us, and come home! Justly are you summoned by all the Cadmeans, and most of all by me, since I—unless I am the worst of all men born—feel most sorrow for your woes, old man


nanUnhappy Oedipus, hear us, and come home! Justly are you summoned by all the Cadmeans, and most of all by me, since I—unless I am the worst of all men born—feel most sorrow for your woes, old man


nanUnhappy Oedipus, hear us, and come home! Justly are you summoned by all the Cadmeans, and most of all by me, since I—unless I am the worst of all men born—feel most sorrow for your woes, old man


nanUnhappy Oedipus, hear us, and come home! Justly are you summoned by all the Cadmeans, and most of all by me, since I—unless I am the worst of all men born—feel most sorrow for your woes, old man


nanwhen I see you, unhappy as you are, a stranger and a wanderer evermore, roaming in beggary, with one handmaid for your support. Ah, me, I had not thought that she could fall to such a depth of misery as that to which she has fallen—


nanwhen I see you, unhappy as you are, a stranger and a wanderer evermore, roaming in beggary, with one handmaid for your support. Ah, me, I had not thought that she could fall to such a depth of misery as that to which she has fallen—


nanwhen I see you, unhappy as you are, a stranger and a wanderer evermore, roaming in beggary, with one handmaid for your support. Ah, me, I had not thought that she could fall to such a depth of misery as that to which she has fallen—


nanwhen I see you, unhappy as you are, a stranger and a wanderer evermore, roaming in beggary, with one handmaid for your support. Ah, me, I had not thought that she could fall to such a depth of misery as that to which she has fallen—


nanwhen I see you, unhappy as you are, a stranger and a wanderer evermore, roaming in beggary, with one handmaid for your support. Ah, me, I had not thought that she could fall to such a depth of misery as that to which she has fallen—


nanthis poor girl!—as she tends forever your dark life amid poverty; in ripe youth, but unwed: a prize for the first passerby to seize. Is it not a cruel reproach—alas!—that I have cast at you, and me, and all our race?


nanthis poor girl!—as she tends forever your dark life amid poverty; in ripe youth, but unwed: a prize for the first passerby to seize. Is it not a cruel reproach—alas!—that I have cast at you, and me, and all our race?


nanthis poor girl!—as she tends forever your dark life amid poverty; in ripe youth, but unwed: a prize for the first passerby to seize. Is it not a cruel reproach—alas!—that I have cast at you, and me, and all our race?


nanthis poor girl!—as she tends forever your dark life amid poverty; in ripe youth, but unwed: a prize for the first passerby to seize. Is it not a cruel reproach—alas!—that I have cast at you, and me, and all our race?


nanthis poor girl!—as she tends forever your dark life amid poverty; in ripe youth, but unwed: a prize for the first passerby to seize. Is it not a cruel reproach—alas!—that I have cast at you, and me, and all our race?


nanBut indeed an open shame cannot be hidden. Oedipus, in the name of your ancestral gods, listen to me! Hide it, and consent to return to the city and the house of your ancestors, after bidding a kind farewell to this city. Athens is worthy; yet your own city has the first claim on your reverence


nanBut indeed an open shame cannot be hidden. Oedipus, in the name of your ancestral gods, listen to me! Hide it, and consent to return to the city and the house of your ancestors, after bidding a kind farewell to this city. Athens is worthy; yet your own city has the first claim on your reverence


nanBut indeed an open shame cannot be hidden. Oedipus, in the name of your ancestral gods, listen to me! Hide it, and consent to return to the city and the house of your ancestors, after bidding a kind farewell to this city. Athens is worthy; yet your own city has the first claim on your reverence


nanBut indeed an open shame cannot be hidden. Oedipus, in the name of your ancestral gods, listen to me! Hide it, and consent to return to the city and the house of your ancestors, after bidding a kind farewell to this city. Athens is worthy; yet your own city has the first claim on your reverence


nanBut indeed an open shame cannot be hidden. Oedipus, in the name of your ancestral gods, listen to me! Hide it, and consent to return to the city and the house of your ancestors, after bidding a kind farewell to this city. Athens is worthy; yet your own city has the first claim on your reverence


nanince it was Thebes that nurtured you long ago. Oedipu


nanYou who will dare anything, who from any just plea would derive a crafty trick, why do you make this attempt on me, and seek once more to snare me in your trap where I would feel most grief?


nanYou who will dare anything, who from any just plea would derive a crafty trick, why do you make this attempt on me, and seek once more to snare me in your trap where I would feel most grief?


nanYou who will dare anything, who from any just plea would derive a crafty trick, why do you make this attempt on me, and seek once more to snare me in your trap where I would feel most grief?


nanYou who will dare anything, who from any just plea would derive a crafty trick, why do you make this attempt on me, and seek once more to snare me in your trap where I would feel most grief?


nanLong ago, when I labored under the sickness of my self-made evils, and I yearned to be cast out of the land, you refused to grant the favor. But when my fierce anger had spent its force, and seclusion in the house was sweet to me


nanLong ago, when I labored under the sickness of my self-made evils, and I yearned to be cast out of the land, you refused to grant the favor. But when my fierce anger had spent its force, and seclusion in the house was sweet to me


nanLong ago, when I labored under the sickness of my self-made evils, and I yearned to be cast out of the land, you refused to grant the favor. But when my fierce anger had spent its force, and seclusion in the house was sweet to me


nanLong ago, when I labored under the sickness of my self-made evils, and I yearned to be cast out of the land, you refused to grant the favor. But when my fierce anger had spent its force, and seclusion in the house was sweet to me


nanLong ago, when I labored under the sickness of my self-made evils, and I yearned to be cast out of the land, you refused to grant the favor. But when my fierce anger had spent its force, and seclusion in the house was sweet to me


nanit was then that you thrust me from the house and cast me from the land. And this common race that you mention—that was not at all dear to you then. Now, in turn, when you see that I have a kindly welcome from this city and all its race, you try to pluck me away, wrapping your cruel thoughts in soft words.


nanit was then that you thrust me from the house and cast me from the land. And this common race that you mention—that was not at all dear to you then. Now, in turn, when you see that I have a kindly welcome from this city and all its race, you try to pluck me away, wrapping your cruel thoughts in soft words.


nanit was then that you thrust me from the house and cast me from the land. And this common race that you mention—that was not at all dear to you then. Now, in turn, when you see that I have a kindly welcome from this city and all its race, you try to pluck me away, wrapping your cruel thoughts in soft words.


nanit was then that you thrust me from the house and cast me from the land. And this common race that you mention—that was not at all dear to you then. Now, in turn, when you see that I have a kindly welcome from this city and all its race, you try to pluck me away, wrapping your cruel thoughts in soft words.


nanit was then that you thrust me from the house and cast me from the land. And this common race that you mention—that was not at all dear to you then. Now, in turn, when you see that I have a kindly welcome from this city and all its race, you try to pluck me away, wrapping your cruel thoughts in soft words.


nanAnd yet what pleasure do you find in this, in treating me as dear against my will? As if a man should refuse you a gift, bring you no aid, when you continually begged for it; but after your heart was sated with your desires, he should grant it then, when the favor could bring no joy


nanAnd yet what pleasure do you find in this, in treating me as dear against my will? As if a man should refuse you a gift, bring you no aid, when you continually begged for it; but after your heart was sated with your desires, he should grant it then, when the favor could bring no joy


nanAnd yet what pleasure do you find in this, in treating me as dear against my will? As if a man should refuse you a gift, bring you no aid, when you continually begged for it; but after your heart was sated with your desires, he should grant it then, when the favor could bring no joy


nanAnd yet what pleasure do you find in this, in treating me as dear against my will? As if a man should refuse you a gift, bring you no aid, when you continually begged for it; but after your heart was sated with your desires, he should grant it then, when the favor could bring no joy


nanAnd yet what pleasure do you find in this, in treating me as dear against my will? As if a man should refuse you a gift, bring you no aid, when you continually begged for it; but after your heart was sated with your desires, he should grant it then, when the favor could bring no joy


nan—would you not find your delight in this empty? Yet such is the nature of your own offers to me: noble in appearance, but in substance base. And I will declare it to these men too, to show you up as base. You have come to get me


nan—would you not find your delight in this empty? Yet such is the nature of your own offers to me: noble in appearance, but in substance base. And I will declare it to these men too, to show you up as base. You have come to get me


nan—would you not find your delight in this empty? Yet such is the nature of your own offers to me: noble in appearance, but in substance base. And I will declare it to these men too, to show you up as base. You have come to get me


nan—would you not find your delight in this empty? Yet such is the nature of your own offers to me: noble in appearance, but in substance base. And I will declare it to these men too, to show you up as base. You have come to get me


nan—would you not find your delight in this empty? Yet such is the nature of your own offers to me: noble in appearance, but in substance base. And I will declare it to these men too, to show you up as base. You have come to get me


nannot to bring me home, but to plant me near your borders, so that your city might escape uninjured by evils from this land. That fate is not for you, but this one: the brooding of my vengeful spirit on your land forever; and for my sons, this heirloom:


nannot to bring me home, but to plant me near your borders, so that your city might escape uninjured by evils from this land. That fate is not for you, but this one: the brooding of my vengeful spirit on your land forever; and for my sons, this heirloom:


nannot to bring me home, but to plant me near your borders, so that your city might escape uninjured by evils from this land. That fate is not for you, but this one: the brooding of my vengeful spirit on your land forever; and for my sons, this heirloom:


nannot to bring me home, but to plant me near your borders, so that your city might escape uninjured by evils from this land. That fate is not for you, but this one: the brooding of my vengeful spirit on your land forever; and for my sons, this heirloom:


nannot to bring me home, but to plant me near your borders, so that your city might escape uninjured by evils from this land. That fate is not for you, but this one: the brooding of my vengeful spirit on your land forever; and for my sons, this heirloom:


nanjust so much soil in my realm in which to die. Am I not wiser than you in the fortunes of Thebes ? Yes, far wiser, by as much as the sources of my knowledge are truer: Phoebus I mean, and his father, Zeus himself. But you have come here with fraud on your lips, yes


nanjust so much soil in my realm in which to die. Am I not wiser than you in the fortunes of Thebes ? Yes, far wiser, by as much as the sources of my knowledge are truer: Phoebus I mean, and his father, Zeus himself. But you have come here with fraud on your lips, yes


nanjust so much soil in my realm in which to die. Am I not wiser than you in the fortunes of Thebes ? Yes, far wiser, by as much as the sources of my knowledge are truer: Phoebus I mean, and his father, Zeus himself. But you have come here with fraud on your lips, yes


nanjust so much soil in my realm in which to die. Am I not wiser than you in the fortunes of Thebes ? Yes, far wiser, by as much as the sources of my knowledge are truer: Phoebus I mean, and his father, Zeus himself. But you have come here with fraud on your lips, yes


nanjust so much soil in my realm in which to die. Am I not wiser than you in the fortunes of Thebes ? Yes, far wiser, by as much as the sources of my knowledge are truer: Phoebus I mean, and his father, Zeus himself. But you have come here with fraud on your lips, yes


nanand with a tongue keener than the edge of a sword; yet by their use you may well reap more sorrow than salvation. Still, since I know that I cannot persuade you of this, go! Allow us to live on here; for even in this plight our life would not be bad, if we should be content with it. Creon


nanand with a tongue keener than the edge of a sword; yet by their use you may well reap more sorrow than salvation. Still, since I know that I cannot persuade you of this, go! Allow us to live on here; for even in this plight our life would not be bad, if we should be content with it. Creon


nanand with a tongue keener than the edge of a sword; yet by their use you may well reap more sorrow than salvation. Still, since I know that I cannot persuade you of this, go! Allow us to live on here; for even in this plight our life would not be bad, if we should be content with it. Creon


nanand with a tongue keener than the edge of a sword; yet by their use you may well reap more sorrow than salvation. Still, since I know that I cannot persuade you of this, go! Allow us to live on here; for even in this plight our life would not be bad, if we should be content with it. Creon


nanand with a tongue keener than the edge of a sword; yet by their use you may well reap more sorrow than salvation. Still, since I know that I cannot persuade you of this, go! Allow us to live on here; for even in this plight our life would not be bad, if we should be content with it. Creon


nanWhich of us, do you think, suffers more in this exchange—I by your action, or you by your own? Oedipu


nanWhich of us, do you think, suffers more in this exchange—I by your action, or you by your own? Oedipu


nanFor me, it is enough if your pleading fails both with me and with these men nearby. Creon


nanFor me, it is enough if your pleading fails both with me and with these men nearby. Creon


nanUnhappy man, will you let everyone see that even in your years you have gained no sense?


nanMust you live on to disgrace your old age? Oedipu


nanYou have a clever tongue, but I know no just man who can produce from every side a pretty speech. Creon


nanYou have a clever tongue, but I know no just man who can produce from every side a pretty speech. Creon


nanWords may be many, and yet not to the point. Oedipu


nanAs if yours, indeed, were few, but on the mark. Creon


nanThey cannot be, not for one whose mind is such as yours. Oedipu


nanBegone! I will say it for these men too. And do not besiege me with a jealous watch where I am destined to remain. Creon


nanBegone! I will say it for these men too. And do not besiege me with a jealous watch where I am destined to remain. Creon


nanI call these men, and not you, to witness the tenor of your words to your friends. And if I ever catch you— Oedipu


nanI call these men, and not you, to witness the tenor of your words to your friends. And if I ever catch you— Oedipu


nanAnd who could catch me against the will of these allies? Creon


nanI promise you, soon you will be pained even without that. Oedipu


nanWhere is the deed which backs that threatening word? Creon


nanOne of your two daughters I have myself just seized and sent away. The other I will drag off immediately. Oedipu


nanOne of your two daughters I have myself just seized and sent away. The other I will drag off immediately. Oedipu


nanOne of your two daughters I have myself just seized and sent away. The other I will drag off immediately. Oedipu


nanOne of your two daughters I have myself just seized and sent away. The other I will drag off immediately. Oedipu


nanOh! Strangers, what will you do? Will you betray me? Will you not drive the godless man from this land? Choru


nanOh! Strangers, what will you do? Will you betray me? Will you not drive the godless man from this land? Choru


nanDepart, stranger! Quick!


nanYour present deed is not just, nor the deed which you have done. Creon To his attendants.


nanIt is time for you to drag this girl off against her will, if she will not go freely. Antigone


nanIt is time for you to drag this girl off against her will, if she will not go freely. Antigone


nanWretched that I am! Where can I flee? Where find help from gods or men? Choru


nanWretched that I am! Where can I flee? Where find help from gods or men? Choru


nanI will not touch this man, but her who is mine. Oedipu


nanI will not touch this man, but her who is mine. Oedipu


nanI will not touch this man, but her who is mine. Oedipu


nanOh, city ! Choru


nanWhat are you doing, stranger? Release her!


nanYour strength and ours will soon come to the test. Creon


nanYour strength and ours will soon come to the test. Creon


nanThere will be war with Thebes for you, if you harm me. Oedipu


nanThere will be war with Thebes for you, if you harm me. Oedipu


nanDo not make commands where you are not the master. Choru


nanDo not make commands where you are not the master. Choru


nanHelp, men of Colonus , bring help! The city, our city, is attacked by force! Come to our aid! Antigone


nanHelp, men of Colonus , bring help! The city, our city, is attacked by force! Come to our aid! Antigone


nanHelp, men of Colonus , bring help! The city, our city, is attacked by force! Come to our aid! Antigone


nanI am being dragged away in misery. Strangers, strangers! Oedipu


nanI am being dragged away in misery. Strangers, strangers! Oedipu


nanI am being dragged away in misery. Strangers, strangers! Oedipu


nanI am being dragged away in misery. Strangers, strangers! Oedipu


nanSo those two staffs will never again support your path.


nanSo those two staffs will never again support your path.


nanBut since you wish to overcome your country and your friends, whose will I, though tyrant as well, am here discharging, then I wish you victory. For in time, I am sure, you will come to recognize all this, that now too as in time past, it is you who have done yourself no good, by indulging your anger despite your friends.


nanBut since you wish to overcome your country and your friends, whose will I, though tyrant as well, am here discharging, then I wish you victory. For in time, I am sure, you will come to recognize all this, that now too as in time past, it is you who have done yourself no good, by indulging your anger despite your friends.


nanBut since you wish to overcome your country and your friends, whose will I, though tyrant as well, am here discharging, then I wish you victory. For in time, I am sure, you will come to recognize all this, that now too as in time past, it is you who have done yourself no good, by indulging your anger despite your friends.


nanBut since you wish to overcome your country and your friends, whose will I, though tyrant as well, am here discharging, then I wish you victory. For in time, I am sure, you will come to recognize all this, that now too as in time past, it is you who have done yourself no good, by indulging your anger despite your friends.


nanBut since you wish to overcome your country and your friends, whose will I, though tyrant as well, am here discharging, then I wish you victory. For in time, I am sure, you will come to recognize all this, that now too as in time past, it is you who have done yourself no good, by indulging your anger despite your friends.


nanThis has always been your ruin. Choru


nanThis has always been your ruin. Choru


nanI will not let go, unless you give back the maidens. Creon


nanThen you will soon give the city a more valuable prize, for I will lay hands on more than those two girls. Choru


nanThen you will soon give the city a more valuable prize, for I will lay hands on more than those two girls. Choru


nanThen you will soon give the city a more valuable prize, for I will lay hands on more than those two girls. Choru


nanThen you will soon give the city a more valuable prize, for I will lay hands on more than those two girls. Choru


nanIndeed, unless the ruler of this realm prevents you. Oedipu


nanVoice of shamelessness! Will you really lay hands on me? Creon


nanVoice of shamelessness! Will you really lay hands on me? Creon


nanVoice of shamelessness! Will you really lay hands on me? Creon


nanVoice of shamelessness! Will you really lay hands on me? Creon


nanVoice of shamelessness! Will you really lay hands on me? Creon


nanVoice of shamelessness! Will you really lay hands on me? Creon


nanVoice of shamelessness! Will you really lay hands on me? Creon


nangrant in time an old age such as mine! Creon


nanDo you see this, people of the land? Oedipu


nanThey see both you and me. They know that I have suffered in deeds, and my defense is mere words. Creon


nanThey see both you and me. They know that I have suffered in deeds, and my defense is mere words. Creon


nanI will not check my anger. Though I am alone


nanand slow with age, I will take this man by force. Oedipu


nanAh, my wretchedness! Choru


nanWhat arrogance you have come with, stranger, if you think you will achieve this! Creon


nanI will. Choru


nanThen I think this city no longer exists. Creon


nanFor men who are just, you see, the weak vanquishes the strong. Oedipu


nanFor men who are just, you see, the weak vanquishes the strong. Oedipu


nanFor men who are just, you see, the weak vanquishes the strong. Oedipu


nanFor men who are just, you see, the weak vanquishes the strong. Oedipu


nanHear people, hear rulers of the land! Come quickly, come!


nanThese men are on their way to cross our borders! Enter Theseus. Theseu


nanThese men are on their way to cross our borders! Enter Theseus. Theseu


nanWhat is this shout? What is the trouble? What fear has moved you to stop my sacrifice at the altar to the sea-god, the lord of your Colonus ? Speak, so that I may know the situation; for that is why I have sped


nanWhat is this shout? What is the trouble? What fear has moved you to stop my sacrifice at the altar to the sea-god, the lord of your Colonus ? Speak, so that I may know the situation; for that is why I have sped


nanWhat is this shout? What is the trouble? What fear has moved you to stop my sacrifice at the altar to the sea-god, the lord of your Colonus ? Speak, so that I may know the situation; for that is why I have sped


nanhere more swiftly than was pleasant. Oedipu


nanDearest of men! I know your voice. Terrible are the things I have just suffered at the hands of this man here. Theseu


nanDearest of men! I know your voice. Terrible are the things I have just suffered at the hands of this man here. Theseu


nanWhat things are these? And who has pained you? Speak! Oedipu


nanCreon, whom you see here


nanhas torn from me my children—my only two. Theseu


nanhas torn from me my children—my only two. Theseu


nanHurry, one of you attendants, to the altars there, and order the people to leave the sacrifice


nanHurry, one of you attendants, to the altars there, and order the people to leave the sacrifice


nanHurry, one of you attendants, to the altars there, and order the people to leave the sacrifice


nanand race on foot and by horse full speed, to the region where the two highways meet, so that the maidens may not pass, and I not become a mockery to this stranger as one worsted by force. Quick, I say, away with you! Turning towards Creon.


nanand race on foot and by horse full speed, to the region where the two highways meet, so that the maidens may not pass, and I not become a mockery to this stranger as one worsted by force. Quick, I say, away with you! Turning towards Creon.


nanand race on foot and by horse full speed, to the region where the two highways meet, so that the maidens may not pass, and I not become a mockery to this stranger as one worsted by force. Quick, I say, away with you! Turning towards Creon.


nanand race on foot and by horse full speed, to the region where the two highways meet, so that the maidens may not pass, and I not become a mockery to this stranger as one worsted by force. Quick, I say, away with you! Turning towards Creon.


nanand race on foot and by horse full speed, to the region where the two highways meet, so that the maidens may not pass, and I not become a mockery to this stranger as one worsted by force. Quick, I say, away with you! Turning towards Creon.


nananger went as far as he deserves, I would not let him go uninjured from my hand. But now, just such law as he himself has brought will be the rule for his correction. Addressing Creon.


nananger went as far as he deserves, I would not let him go uninjured from my hand. But now, just such law as he himself has brought will be the rule for his correction. Addressing Creon.


nananger went as far as he deserves, I would not let him go uninjured from my hand. But now, just such law as he himself has brought will be the rule for his correction. Addressing Creon.


nananger went as far as he deserves, I would not let him go uninjured from my hand. But now, just such law as he himself has brought will be the rule for his correction. Addressing Creon.


nanYou will never leave this land


nanuntil you bring those maidens and produce them in my sight. For your action is a disgrace to me, and to your own ancestors, and to your country. You have come to a city that practices justice and sanctions nothing without law


nanuntil you bring those maidens and produce them in my sight. For your action is a disgrace to me, and to your own ancestors, and to your country. You have come to a city that practices justice and sanctions nothing without law


nanuntil you bring those maidens and produce them in my sight. For your action is a disgrace to me, and to your own ancestors, and to your country. You have come to a city that practices justice and sanctions nothing without law


nanuntil you bring those maidens and produce them in my sight. For your action is a disgrace to me, and to your own ancestors, and to your country. You have come to a city that practices justice and sanctions nothing without law


nanuntil you bring those maidens and produce them in my sight. For your action is a disgrace to me, and to your own ancestors, and to your country. You have come to a city that practices justice and sanctions nothing without law


nanyet you have spurned her lawful authorities and made this violent assault. You are taking captives at will and subjugating them by force, as if you believed that my city was void of men, or manned by slaves, and that I counted for nothing. Yet it was not Thebes that trained you to be evil. Thebes is not accustomed to rearing unjust men;—


nanyet you have spurned her lawful authorities and made this violent assault. You are taking captives at will and subjugating them by force, as if you believed that my city was void of men, or manned by slaves, and that I counted for nothing. Yet it was not Thebes that trained you to be evil. Thebes is not accustomed to rearing unjust men;—


nanyet you have spurned her lawful authorities and made this violent assault. You are taking captives at will and subjugating them by force, as if you believed that my city was void of men, or manned by slaves, and that I counted for nothing. Yet it was not Thebes that trained you to be evil. Thebes is not accustomed to rearing unjust men;—


nanyet you have spurned her lawful authorities and made this violent assault. You are taking captives at will and subjugating them by force, as if you believed that my city was void of men, or manned by slaves, and that I counted for nothing. Yet it was not Thebes that trained you to be evil. Thebes is not accustomed to rearing unjust men;—


nanyet you have spurned her lawful authorities and made this violent assault. You are taking captives at will and subjugating them by force, as if you believed that my city was void of men, or manned by slaves, and that I counted for nothing. Yet it was not Thebes that trained you to be evil. Thebes is not accustomed to rearing unjust men;—


nannor would she praise you, if she learned that you are despoiling me, and despoiling the gods, when by force you drive off their unfortunate suppliants. If my foot were upon your land, never would I drag off or lead away someone


nannor would she praise you, if she learned that you are despoiling me, and despoiling the gods, when by force you drive off their unfortunate suppliants. If my foot were upon your land, never would I drag off or lead away someone


nannor would she praise you, if she learned that you are despoiling me, and despoiling the gods, when by force you drive off their unfortunate suppliants. If my foot were upon your land, never would I drag off or lead away someone


nannor would she praise you, if she learned that you are despoiling me, and despoiling the gods, when by force you drive off their unfortunate suppliants. If my foot were upon your land, never would I drag off or lead away someone


nannor would she praise you, if she learned that you are despoiling me, and despoiling the gods, when by force you drive off their unfortunate suppliants. If my foot were upon your land, never would I drag off or lead away someone


nanwithout permission from the ruler of the land, whoever he might be—no, even if my claim were the most just of all. I would know how a stranger ought to live among citizens. But you are disgracing a city that does not deserve it: your own


nanwithout permission from the ruler of the land, whoever he might be—no, even if my claim were the most just of all. I would know how a stranger ought to live among citizens. But you are disgracing a city that does not deserve it: your own


nanwithout permission from the ruler of the land, whoever he might be—no, even if my claim were the most just of all. I would know how a stranger ought to live among citizens. But you are disgracing a city that does not deserve it: your own


nanwithout permission from the ruler of the land, whoever he might be—no, even if my claim were the most just of all. I would know how a stranger ought to live among citizens. But you are disgracing a city that does not deserve it: your own


nanwithout permission from the ruler of the land, whoever he might be—no, even if my claim were the most just of all. I would know how a stranger ought to live among citizens. But you are disgracing a city that does not deserve it: your own


nanand your years, despite their fullness, bring you an old age barren of sense. Now, I have said before, and I say it once again: let the maidens be brought here speedily, unless you wish to be an unwilling immigrant to this country by force.


nanand your years, despite their fullness, bring you an old age barren of sense. Now, I have said before, and I say it once again: let the maidens be brought here speedily, unless you wish to be an unwilling immigrant to this country by force.


nanand your years, despite their fullness, bring you an old age barren of sense. Now, I have said before, and I say it once again: let the maidens be brought here speedily, unless you wish to be an unwilling immigrant to this country by force.


nanand your years, despite their fullness, bring you an old age barren of sense. Now, I have said before, and I say it once again: let the maidens be brought here speedily, unless you wish to be an unwilling immigrant to this country by force.


nanand your years, despite their fullness, bring you an old age barren of sense. Now, I have said before, and I say it once again: let the maidens be brought here speedily, unless you wish to be an unwilling immigrant to this country by force.


nanThese are the words of my lips; my mind is in accord. Choru


nanThese are the words of my lips; my mind is in accord. Choru


nanDo you see your plight, stranger? You are judged to be just by where you are from, but your deeds are found to be evil. Creon


nanDo you see your plight, stranger? You are judged to be just by where you are from, but your deeds are found to be evil. Creon


nanIt is not because I thought this city void of men, son of Aegeus, or of counsel, as you say


nanthat I have done this deed; but because I judged that its people could never be so zealous for my relatives as to support them against my will. And I knew that this people would not receive a parricide and a polluted man


nanthat I have done this deed; but because I judged that its people could never be so zealous for my relatives as to support them against my will. And I knew that this people would not receive a parricide and a polluted man


nanthat I have done this deed; but because I judged that its people could never be so zealous for my relatives as to support them against my will. And I knew that this people would not receive a parricide and a polluted man


nanthat I have done this deed; but because I judged that its people could never be so zealous for my relatives as to support them against my will. And I knew that this people would not receive a parricide and a polluted man


nanthat I have done this deed; but because I judged that its people could never be so zealous for my relatives as to support them against my will. And I knew that this people would not receive a parricide and a polluted man


nana man whose unholy marriage—a marriage with children—had been found out. Such wisdom, I knew, was immemorial on the Areopagus, which does not allow such wanderers to dwell within this city. Trusting in that, I sought to take this prize.


nana man whose unholy marriage—a marriage with children—had been found out. Such wisdom, I knew, was immemorial on the Areopagus, which does not allow such wanderers to dwell within this city. Trusting in that, I sought to take this prize.


nana man whose unholy marriage—a marriage with children—had been found out. Such wisdom, I knew, was immemorial on the Areopagus, which does not allow such wanderers to dwell within this city. Trusting in that, I sought to take this prize.


nana man whose unholy marriage—a marriage with children—had been found out. Such wisdom, I knew, was immemorial on the Areopagus, which does not allow such wanderers to dwell within this city. Trusting in that, I sought to take this prize.


nana man whose unholy marriage—a marriage with children—had been found out. Such wisdom, I knew, was immemorial on the Areopagus, which does not allow such wanderers to dwell within this city. Trusting in that, I sought to take this prize.


nanAnd I would not have done so, had he not been calling down bitter curses on me and on my race. As I was wronged in this way, I judged that I had a right to this requital. For anger knows no old age, until death comes;


nanAnd I would not have done so, had he not been calling down bitter curses on me and on my race. As I was wronged in this way, I judged that I had a right to this requital. For anger knows no old age, until death comes;


nanAnd I would not have done so, had he not been calling down bitter curses on me and on my race. As I was wronged in this way, I judged that I had a right to this requital. For anger knows no old age, until death comes;


nanAnd I would not have done so, had he not been calling down bitter curses on me and on my race. As I was wronged in this way, I judged that I had a right to this requital. For anger knows no old age, until death comes;


nanAnd I would not have done so, had he not been calling down bitter curses on me and on my race. As I was wronged in this way, I judged that I had a right to this requital. For anger knows no old age, until death comes;


nanthe dead alone feel no galling pain. In response to this, you will do what pleases you; for, though my case is just, the lack of aid makes me weak. Yet in the face of your actions, despite my age, I will endeavor to pay you back. Oedipu


nanthe dead alone feel no galling pain. In response to this, you will do what pleases you; for, though my case is just, the lack of aid makes me weak. Yet in the face of your actions, despite my age, I will endeavor to pay you back. Oedipu


nanthe dead alone feel no galling pain. In response to this, you will do what pleases you; for, though my case is just, the lack of aid makes me weak. Yet in the face of your actions, despite my age, I will endeavor to pay you back. Oedipu


nanthe dead alone feel no galling pain. In response to this, you will do what pleases you; for, though my case is just, the lack of aid makes me weak. Yet in the face of your actions, despite my age, I will endeavor to pay you back. Oedipu


nanthe dead alone feel no galling pain. In response to this, you will do what pleases you; for, though my case is just, the lack of aid makes me weak. Yet in the face of your actions, despite my age, I will endeavor to pay you back. Oedipu


nanShameless arrogance, where do you think this outrage falls—on my old age, or on your own? Bloodshed, incest, misery—all this your tongue has launched against me, and all this I have borne in my wretchedness by no choice of mine.


nanShameless arrogance, where do you think this outrage falls—on my old age, or on your own? Bloodshed, incest, misery—all this your tongue has launched against me, and all this I have borne in my wretchedness by no choice of mine.


nanShameless arrogance, where do you think this outrage falls—on my old age, or on your own? Bloodshed, incest, misery—all this your tongue has launched against me, and all this I have borne in my wretchedness by no choice of mine.


nanShameless arrogance, where do you think this outrage falls—on my old age, or on your own? Bloodshed, incest, misery—all this your tongue has launched against me, and all this I have borne in my wretchedness by no choice of mine.


nanShameless arrogance, where do you think this outrage falls—on my old age, or on your own? Bloodshed, incest, misery—all this your tongue has launched against me, and all this I have borne in my wretchedness by no choice of mine.


nanFor this was dear to the gods, who were angry, perhaps, with my race from of old. Taking me alone, you could not find a reproach for any crime, in retribution for which I was driven to commit these sins against myself and against my kin. Tell me now: if, by the voice of an oracle, some divine doom was coming on my father


nanFor this was dear to the gods, who were angry, perhaps, with my race from of old. Taking me alone, you could not find a reproach for any crime, in retribution for which I was driven to commit these sins against myself and against my kin. Tell me now: if, by the voice of an oracle, some divine doom was coming on my father


nanFor this was dear to the gods, who were angry, perhaps, with my race from of old. Taking me alone, you could not find a reproach for any crime, in retribution for which I was driven to commit these sins against myself and against my kin. Tell me now: if, by the voice of an oracle, some divine doom was coming on my father


nanFor this was dear to the gods, who were angry, perhaps, with my race from of old. Taking me alone, you could not find a reproach for any crime, in retribution for which I was driven to commit these sins against myself and against my kin. Tell me now: if, by the voice of an oracle, some divine doom was coming on my father


nanFor this was dear to the gods, who were angry, perhaps, with my race from of old. Taking me alone, you could not find a reproach for any crime, in retribution for which I was driven to commit these sins against myself and against my kin. Tell me now: if, by the voice of an oracle, some divine doom was coming on my father


nanthat he should die by a son’s hand, how could you justly reproach me with this, when I was then unborn, when no father had yet begotten me, no mother’s womb conceived me? But if, having been born to misery—as I was born—I came to blows with my father and slew him, ignorant of what


nanthat he should die by a son’s hand, how could you justly reproach me with this, when I was then unborn, when no father had yet begotten me, no mother’s womb conceived me? But if, having been born to misery—as I was born—I came to blows with my father and slew him, ignorant of what


nanthat he should die by a son’s hand, how could you justly reproach me with this, when I was then unborn, when no father had yet begotten me, no mother’s womb conceived me? But if, having been born to misery—as I was born—I came to blows with my father and slew him, ignorant of what


nanthat he should die by a son’s hand, how could you justly reproach me with this, when I was then unborn, when no father had yet begotten me, no mother’s womb conceived me? But if, having been born to misery—as I was born—I came to blows with my father and slew him, ignorant of what


nanthat he should die by a son’s hand, how could you justly reproach me with this, when I was then unborn, when no father had yet begotten me, no mother’s womb conceived me? But if, having been born to misery—as I was born—I came to blows with my father and slew him, ignorant of what


nanI was doing and to whom, how could you reasonably blame the unwitting deed? And my mother—wretch, do you feel no shame in forcing me to speak of her marriage, when she was your sister, and when it was such as I will now tell?


nanI was doing and to whom, how could you reasonably blame the unwitting deed? And my mother—wretch, do you feel no shame in forcing me to speak of her marriage, when she was your sister, and when it was such as I will now tell?


nanI was doing and to whom, how could you reasonably blame the unwitting deed? And my mother—wretch, do you feel no shame in forcing me to speak of her marriage, when she was your sister, and when it was such as I will now tell?


nanI was doing and to whom, how could you reasonably blame the unwitting deed? And my mother—wretch, do you feel no shame in forcing me to speak of her marriage, when she was your sister, and when it was such as I will now tell?


nanI was doing and to whom, how could you reasonably blame the unwitting deed? And my mother—wretch, do you feel no shame in forcing me to speak of her marriage, when she was your sister, and when it was such as I will now tell?


nanFor I will not be silent, when you have gone so far in impious speech. Yes, she was my mother, yes—alas, for my miseries! I did not know it, nor did she, and to her shame she bore children to the son whom she had borne.


nanFor I will not be silent, when you have gone so far in impious speech. Yes, she was my mother, yes—alas, for my miseries! I did not know it, nor did she, and to her shame she bore children to the son whom she had borne.


nanFor I will not be silent, when you have gone so far in impious speech. Yes, she was my mother, yes—alas, for my miseries! I did not know it, nor did she, and to her shame she bore children to the son whom she had borne.


nanFor I will not be silent, when you have gone so far in impious speech. Yes, she was my mother, yes—alas, for my miseries! I did not know it, nor did she, and to her shame she bore children to the son whom she had borne.


nanFor I will not be silent, when you have gone so far in impious speech. Yes, she was my mother, yes—alas, for my miseries! I did not know it, nor did she, and to her shame she bore children to the son whom she had borne.


nanBut one thing, at least, I know: that you willingly revile her and me, but I did not willingly marry her, and I do not willingly speak now. No, I will not be called evil on account of this marriage, nor in the slaying of my father, which you charge me with again and again in bitter insult.


nanBut one thing, at least, I know: that you willingly revile her and me, but I did not willingly marry her, and I do not willingly speak now. No, I will not be called evil on account of this marriage, nor in the slaying of my father, which you charge me with again and again in bitter insult.


nanBut one thing, at least, I know: that you willingly revile her and me, but I did not willingly marry her, and I do not willingly speak now. No, I will not be called evil on account of this marriage, nor in the slaying of my father, which you charge me with again and again in bitter insult.


nanBut one thing, at least, I know: that you willingly revile her and me, but I did not willingly marry her, and I do not willingly speak now. No, I will not be called evil on account of this marriage, nor in the slaying of my father, which you charge me with again and again in bitter insult.


nanBut one thing, at least, I know: that you willingly revile her and me, but I did not willingly marry her, and I do not willingly speak now. No, I will not be called evil on account of this marriage, nor in the slaying of my father, which you charge me with again and again in bitter insult.


nanAnswer just one thing of those I ask. If, here and now, someone should come up and try to murder you—you, the just one—would you ask if the murderer was your father, or would you revenge yourself on him straightaway?


nanAnswer just one thing of those I ask. If, here and now, someone should come up and try to murder you—you, the just one—would you ask if the murderer was your father, or would you revenge yourself on him straightaway?


nanAnswer just one thing of those I ask. If, here and now, someone should come up and try to murder you—you, the just one—would you ask if the murderer was your father, or would you revenge yourself on him straightaway?


nanAnswer just one thing of those I ask. If, here and now, someone should come up and try to murder you—you, the just one—would you ask if the murderer was your father, or would you revenge yourself on him straightaway?


nanAnswer just one thing of those I ask. If, here and now, someone should come up and try to murder you—you, the just one—would you ask if the murderer was your father, or would you revenge yourself on him straightaway?


nanI think that if your life is dear to you, you would requite the criminal, and not look around for a justification. Such then were the evils into which I came, led by the gods; and in this, I think, my father’s soul, could it come back to life, would not contradict me.


nanI think that if your life is dear to you, you would requite the criminal, and not look around for a justification. Such then were the evils into which I came, led by the gods; and in this, I think, my father’s soul, could it come back to life, would not contradict me.


nanI think that if your life is dear to you, you would requite the criminal, and not look around for a justification. Such then were the evils into which I came, led by the gods; and in this, I think, my father’s soul, could it come back to life, would not contradict me.


nanI think that if your life is dear to you, you would requite the criminal, and not look around for a justification. Such then were the evils into which I came, led by the gods; and in this, I think, my father’s soul, could it come back to life, would not contradict me.


nanI think that if your life is dear to you, you would requite the criminal, and not look around for a justification. Such then were the evils into which I came, led by the gods; and in this, I think, my father’s soul, could it come back to life, would not contradict me.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 585 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

585. πολλαὶ μέν ἐσμεν, λέξομεν δὲ συντόμως. 585. We are many, but we will speak briefly. To Orestes. Answer our questions, one by one. Say first if you killed your mother. Orestes
2. Euripides, Hippolytus, 921 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

921. A very master in his craft the man, who can force fools to be wise! But these ill-timed subtleties of thine, father, make me fear thy tongue is running riot through trouble. Theseu
3. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 1104-1140, 1175, 1099 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 903 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Sophocles, Ajax, 245-256, 298-299, 349-350, 364-367, 387-391, 412-413, 443, 457-466, 479-480, 492-493, 522, 542-543, 560-573, 594-595, 646-647, 658-665, 672-673, 677, 679-683, 201 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Sophocles, Antigone, 472, 471 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 1001-1043, 1049-1051, 1095, 1156-1181, 1199, 1249, 1254-1396, 1413-1446, 1514-1515, 1518-1555, 2, 510-511, 521-548, 551-651, 654, 668-699, 7, 700-799, 8, 800-869, 87, 870-879, 88, 880-889, 89, 890-899, 90, 900-999, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 83, 82 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 178 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

178. Hush—no more ill-omened words! I see a man approaching who is crowned with garlands as if for joyous news. Enter the Messenger. Messenger:
10. Aristotle, Poetics, 18 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

11. Statius, Thebais, 10.674-10.675, 10.683-10.685, 10.688, 10.699-10.719, 10.721, 10.736-10.737, 10.756-10.797, 10.801, 10.806-10.813, 10.817-10.818, 11.707, 11.724 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
advocate Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 161
aeschylus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153
amphiaraus (prophet) Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 271
antigone, and oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
antigone Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203
antigone (sophocles), creon in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
apollo Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 271
aristotle, on tragedy Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
aristotle aristotle Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153, 161
arrival, of creon Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
arrival, of the chorus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
athens Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153, 164; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203, 204, 205
audience, theatre Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 271
audience Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 161, 164
bad (κακός) Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 161
characters Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
chorus, the, arrival of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
claudius, roman emperor, expulsion of jews from rome by Feldman, Judaism and Hellenism Reconsidered (2006) 442
cleon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 164
colonus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203
complication, and denouement Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
conacher, d. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153
creon, and oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 452
creon, arrival of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
creon, as a repeating character Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
creon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 161, 164; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203, 204, 205; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 271
criminal, oedipus as Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 452
deception Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
defence Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 164
demosthenes Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153, 164
denouement, and complication Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
deuotio Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 205
dionysus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 271
discourse Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153
discovery, and tragic reversal Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 452
drama Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153
episodes, length of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
episodes, of oedipus at colonus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 522, 523
episodes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
epode Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 170
eteocles Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203, 204, 205
eumenides Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 271
euripides Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 271
fear, and oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 452
forensic oratory Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 161
general parodos, and the choruss arrival Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
goldhill, s. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 164
greek tragedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153
halliwell, s. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153, 161, 164
ismene Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203
justice Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 452
justification, of oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 452
menoeceus Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 205
messenger, tragic Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 271
naples, bilingualism in Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203, 204, 205
nature, of creon Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
nature, of oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
nobility, of oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
oedipus, and tragic discovery Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 452
oedipus, as a repeating character Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
oedipus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153, 161, 164; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203, 204, 205; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 522, 523; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 271
oedipus at colonus (sophocles), and discovery Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 452
oedipus at colonus (sophocles), creon in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
oedipus at colonus (sophocles), oedipus in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
oedipus at colonus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 522, 523
oedipus the king (sophocles), creon in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
oedipus the king (sophocles), oedipus in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
oracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 271
oratory Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 161, 164
parakatalogē Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153
performance Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153
poetry Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153
polynices Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203, 204, 205
repetition, of characters Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 358
reversal, tragic Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 452
rhetoric Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153, 161
sanctuary, of the eumenides Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 452
sansone, d. Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 164
seven against thebes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 271
solon Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 164
sophocles Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153, 161
spectators Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 164
stasima, of oedipus at colonus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 522, 523
statius, and euripides Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 205
statius, and greek tragedy Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203, 204, 205
statius, and sophocles Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203, 204, 205
statius, father of Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203, 204, 205
structure, of oedipus at colonus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 522, 523
thebes Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203, 204, 205
theseus Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 164; Augoustakis, Flavian Poetry and its Greek Past (2014) 203, 204, 205
thucydides Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 164
tragedy' Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 153
tragedy Poet and Orator: A Symbiotic Relationship in Democratic Athens (2019)" 161, 164; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715