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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10413
Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 1548


nanallow me unaided to find the sacred tomb where it is my fate to be buried in this land. This way, here—come this way! Hermes the Conductor and the goddess of the dead lead me in this direction. Light of day, no light to me, once you were mine


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

22 results
1. Hesiod, Theogony, 767, 185 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

185. “Children, your father’s sinful, so hear me,”
2. Homer, Iliad, 9.259, 9.418, 9.569, 14.274 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9.259. /give thee if they be so minded, but do thou curb thy proud spirit in thy breast, for gentle-mindedness is the better part; and withdraw thee from strife, contriver of mischief, that so the Argives both young and old may honour thee the more.’ On this wise did that old man charge thee, but thou forgettest. Yet do thou lease even now 9.418. /lost then is my glorious renown, yet shall my life long endure, neither shall the doom of death come soon upon me. 9.569. /By her side lay Meleager nursing his bitter anger, wroth because of his mother's curses; for she prayed instantly to the gods, being grieved for her brother's slaying; and furthermore instantly beat with her hands upon the all-nurturing earth, calling upon Hades and dread Persephone 14.274. /So spake she, and Sleep waxed glad, and made answer saying:Come now, swear to me by the inviolable water of Styx, and with one hand lay thou hold of the bounteous earth, and with the other of the shimmering sea, that one and all they may be witnesses betwixt us twain, even the gods that are below with Cronos
3. Homer, Odyssey, 17.475, 20.78 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

4. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 1 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. Ἑρμῆ χθόνιε, πατρῷʼ ἐποπτεύων κράτη 1. Hermes of the nether world, you who guard the powers that are your father’s, note anchored=
5. Aeschylus, Eumenides, 417 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

417. Ἀραὶ δʼ ἐν οἴκοις γῆς ὑπαὶ κεκλήμεθα. Ἀθηνᾶ
6. Aeschylus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Aeschylus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Aeschylus, Fragments, None (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Aeschylus, Persians, 628 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

628. ἀλλά, χθόνιοι δαίμονες ἁγνοί
10. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 70 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

70. Ἀρά τʼ Ἐρινὺς πατρὸς ἡ μεγασθενής 70. and Curse, note anchored=
11. Aristophanes, Frogs, 82 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

82. ὁ δ' εὔκολος μὲν ἐνθάδ' εὔκολος δ' ἐκεῖ.
12. Euripides, Alcestis, 361 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Euripides, Helen, 1307, 1306 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1306. πόθῳ τᾶς ἀποιχομένας
14. Euripides, Rhesus, 963 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

963. of Death’s eternal bride, the heavenly-born
15. Sophocles, Ajax, 201, 245-256, 298-299, 349-350, 364-367, 387-391, 412-413, 443, 457-466, 479-480, 492-493, 522, 542-543, 560-573, 594-595, 646-647, 658-665, 672-673, 677, 679-683, 690, 837, 1372 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

16. Sophocles, Electra, 111, 110 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 1001-1043, 1156-1181, 1199, 1249, 1254-1396, 1413-1446, 1460, 1514-1515, 1518-1547, 1549-1555, 1612, 607-628, 720-889, 89, 890-899, 90, 900-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 83, 82 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 178 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

178. Hush—no more ill-omened words! I see a man approaching who is crowned with garlands as if for joyous news. Enter the Messenger. Messenger:
20. Aristotle, Poetics, 18 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

21. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 1.96 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

1.96. 1.  But now that we have examined these matters, we must enumerate what Greeks, who have won fame for their wisdom and learning, visited Egypt in ancient times, in order to become acquainted with its customs and learning.,2.  For the priests of Egypt recount from the records of their sacred books that they were visited in early times by Orpheus, Musaeus, Melampus, and Daedalus, also by the poet Homer and Lycurgus of Sparta, later by Solon of Athens and the philosopher Plato, and that there also came Pythagoras of Samos and the mathematician Eudoxus, as well as Democritus of Abdera and Oenopides of Chios.,3.  As evidence for the visits of all these men they point in some cases to their statues and in others to places or buildings which bear their names, and they offer proofs from the branch of learning which each one of these men pursued, arguing that all the things for which they were admired among the Greeks were transferred from Egypt.,4.  Orpheus, for instance, brought from Egypt most of his mystic ceremonies, the orgiastic rites that accompanied his wanderings, and his fabulous account of his experiences in Hades.,5.  For the rite of Osiris is the same as that of Dionysus and that of Isis very similar to that of Demeter, the names alone having been interchanged; and the punishments in Hades of the unrighteous, the Fields of the Righteous, and the fantastic conceptions, current among the many, which are figments of the imagination — all these were introduced by Orpheus in imitation of the Egyptian funeral customs.,6.  Hermes, for instance, the Conductor of Souls, according to the ancient Egyptian custom, brings up the body of the Apis to a certain point and then gives it over to one who wears the mask of Cerberus. And after Orpheus had introduced this notion among the Greeks, Homer followed it when he wrote: Cyllenian Hermes then did summon forth The suitors's souls, holding his wand in hand. And again a little further on he says: They passed Oceanus' streams, the Gleaming Rock, The Portals of the Sun, the Land of Dreams; And now they reached the Meadow of Asphodel, Where dwell the Souls, the shades of men outworn.,7.  Now he calls the river "Oceanus" because in their language the Egyptians speak of the Nile as Oceanus; the "Portals of the Sun" (Heliopulai) is his name for the city of Heliopolis; and "Meadows," the mythical dwelling of the dead, is his term for the place near the lake which is called Acherousia, which is near Memphis, and around it are fairest meadows, of a marsh-land and lotus and reeds. The same explanation also serves for the statement that the dwelling of the dead is in these regions, since the most and the largest tombs of the Egyptians are situated there, the dead being ferried across both the river and Lake Acherousia and their bodies laid in the vaults situated there.,8.  The other myths about Hades, current among the Greeks, also agree with the customs which are practised even now in Egypt. For the boat which receives the bodies is called baris, and the passenger's fee is given to the boatman, who in the Egyptian tongue is called charon.,9.  And near these regions, they say, are also the "Shades," which is a temple of Hecate, and "portals" of Cocytus and Lethe, which are covered at intervals with bands of bronze. There are, moreover, other portals, namely, those of Truth, and near them stands a headless statue of Justice.
22. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.28.6 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.28.6. Hard by is a sanctuary of the goddesses which the Athenians call the August, but Hesiod in the Theogony l. 185. calls them Erinyes (Furies). It was Aeschylus who first represented them with snakes in their hair. But on the images neither of these nor of any of the under-world deities is there anything terrible. There are images of Pluto, Hermes, and Earth, by which sacrifice those who have received an acquittal on the Hill of Ares; sacrifices are also offered on other occasions by both citizens and aliens.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antigone (antigone) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 102
ara Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 747
aristotle, on tragedy Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
arrival, of creon Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
arrival, of the chorus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
athens Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
blind oaths, heracles and hyllus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 102
charon Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 228
chorus, the, arrival of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
complication, and denouement Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
creon, arrival of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
cult epithets Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 228
defixio Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
demeter Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
denouement, and complication Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
eleusian mysteries Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
episodes, length of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
episodes, of oedipus at colonus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 525
episodes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
erinyes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 747; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
eschatology Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
eubouleus Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
exodos, of oedipus at colonus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 525
friends Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 102
funerary Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 228
general parodos, and the choruss arrival Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
hades, god Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
handclasping (dexiōsis), signifying friendship' Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 102
hermes, chthonios Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 228
hermes, pompaios Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 228
hermes, pompos Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 228
hermes, psychopompos Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 228
hermes Mackil and Papazarkadas, Greek Epigraphy and Religion: Papers in Memory of Sara B (2020) 228; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 171
hyllus, oath with Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 102
hyllus, oath with heracles Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 102
lamentation Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 171
messenger, tragic Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 171
oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 525
oedipus at colonus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 525
orpheus, orphic gold leaves, crete Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
orpheus, orphic gold leaves, entella Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
orpheus, orphic gold leaves, hipponion Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
orpheus, orphic gold leaves Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
orphic initiation Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
orphic pass-words, pelinna Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
orphic pass-words, pella/dion Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
orphic pass-words, thurii Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
orphic pass-words Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
persephone Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 171; Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
plato, platonic tradition Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
prayer, of ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 747
righteous dead Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
sicily Waldner et al., Burial Rituals, Ideas of Afterlife, and the Individual in the Hellenistic World and the Roman Empire (2016) 33
stasima, of oedipus at colonus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 525
structure, of oedipus at colonus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 525
theseus, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 102
tragedy Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
zeus, oaths invoking, head of zeus Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 102
zeus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 171