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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10410
Sophocles, Electra, 943-989


nanThat you be brave in executing what I recommend. Chrysothemi


nanIf any good can be done, I will not refuse. Electra


nanRemember, nothing succeeds without toil. Chrysothemi


nanELECTRA: Remember, nothing succeeds without toil. CHRYSOTHEMIS: I know it, and will share thy burden with all my power. ELECTRA: Hear, then, how I am resolved to act. As for the support of friends, thou thyself must know that we have none; Hades hath taken our friends away. and we two are left alone. I, so long as I heard that my brother still lived and prospered, had hopes that he would yet come to avenge the murder of our sire. But now that he is no more, I: look next to thee, not to flinch from aiding me thy sister to slay our father's murderer, Aegisthus:- I must have no secret from thee more. How long art thou to wait inactive? What hope is left standing, to which thine eyes can turn? Thou hast to complain that thou art robbed of thy father's heritage; thou hast to mourn that thus far thy life is fading without nuptial song or wedded love. Nay, and do not hope that such joys will ever be thine; Aegisthus is not so ill-advised as ever to permit that children should spring from thee or me for his own sure destruction. But if thou wilt follow my counsels, first thou wilt win praise of piety from our dead sire below, and from our brother too; next, thou shalt be called free henceforth, as thou wert born, and shalt find worthy bridals; for noble natures draw the gaze of all. Then seest thou not what fair fame thou wilt win for thyself and for me, by hearkening to my word? What citizen or stranger, when he sees us, will not greet us with praises such as these?- 'Behold these two sisters, my friends, who saved their father's house; who, when their foes were firmly planted of yore, took their lives in their hands and stood forth as avengers of blood! Worthy of love are these twain, worthy of reverence from all; at festivals, and wherever the folk are assembled, let these be honoured of all men for their prowess.' Thus will every one speak of us, so that in life and in death our glory shall not fail. Come, dear sister, hearken! Work with thy sire, share the burden of thy brother, win rest from woes for me and for thyself,- mindful of this, that an ignoble life brings shame upon the noble. LEADER OF THE CHORUS: In such case as this, forethought is helpful for those who speak and those who hear. CHRYSOTHEMIS: Yea, and before she spake, my friends, were she blest with a sound mind, she would have remembered caution, as she doth not remember it. Now whither canst thou have turned thine eyes, that thou art arming thyself with such rashness, and calling me to aid thee? Seest thou not, thou art a woman, not a man, and no match for thine adversaries in strength? And their fortune prospers day by day, while ours is ebbing and coming to nought. Who, then, plotting to vanquish a foe so strong, shall escape without suffering deadly scathe? See that we change not our evil plight to worse, if any one hears these words. It brings us no relief or benefit, if, after winning fair fame, we die an ignominious death; for mere death is not the bitterest, but rather when one who wants to die cannot obtain even that boon. Nay, I beseech thee, before we are utterly destroyed, and leave our house desolate, restrain thy rage! I will take care that thy words remain secret and harmless; and learn thou the prudence, at last though late, of yielding, when so helpless, to thy rulers. LEADER: Hearken; there is no better gain for mortals to win than foresight and a prudent mind. ELECTRA: Thou hast said nothing unlooked-for; I well knew that thou wouldst reject what I proffered. Well! I must do this deed with mine own hand, and alone; for assuredly I will not leave it void. CHRYSOTHEMIS: Alas! Would thou hadst been so purposed on the day of our father's death! What mightst thou not have wrought? ELECTRA: My nature was the same then, but my mind less ripe. CHRYSOTHEMIS: Strive to keep such a mind through all thy life.


nanI know it, and I will share your burden with all my power. Electra


nanHear, then, in what way I have decided to take action. As for the support of friends, you yourself doubtless know that we have none. Hades has taken our friends away


nanHear, then, in what way I have decided to take action. As for the support of friends, you yourself doubtless know that we have none. Hades has taken our friends away


nanHear, then, in what way I have decided to take action. As for the support of friends, you yourself doubtless know that we have none. Hades has taken our friends away


nanand we two are left alone. I, so long as I heard that my brother still lived and prospered, had hopes that he would yet come to avenge the murder of our father. But now that he is no more, I look next to you


nanand we two are left alone. I, so long as I heard that my brother still lived and prospered, had hopes that he would yet come to avenge the murder of our father. But now that he is no more, I look next to you


nanand we two are left alone. I, so long as I heard that my brother still lived and prospered, had hopes that he would yet come to avenge the murder of our father. But now that he is no more, I look next to you


nanand we two are left alone. I, so long as I heard that my brother still lived and prospered, had hopes that he would yet come to avenge the murder of our father. But now that he is no more, I look next to you


nanand we two are left alone. I, so long as I heard that my brother still lived and prospered, had hopes that he would yet come to avenge the murder of our father. But now that he is no more, I look next to you


nanand ask that you not flinch from aiding me, your sister, to slay our father’s murderer, Aegisthus. There—I can have no secrets from you anymore. How long will you wait in indifference? What hope is left standing, to which your eyes can turn? Now you are right to complain


nanand ask that you not flinch from aiding me, your sister, to slay our father’s murderer, Aegisthus. There—I can have no secrets from you anymore. How long will you wait in indifference? What hope is left standing, to which your eyes can turn? Now you are right to complain


nanand ask that you not flinch from aiding me, your sister, to slay our father’s murderer, Aegisthus. There—I can have no secrets from you anymore. How long will you wait in indifference? What hope is left standing, to which your eyes can turn? Now you are right to complain


nanand ask that you not flinch from aiding me, your sister, to slay our father’s murderer, Aegisthus. There—I can have no secrets from you anymore. How long will you wait in indifference? What hope is left standing, to which your eyes can turn? Now you are right to complain


nanand ask that you not flinch from aiding me, your sister, to slay our father’s murderer, Aegisthus. There—I can have no secrets from you anymore. How long will you wait in indifference? What hope is left standing, to which your eyes can turn? Now you are right to complain


nanthat you are robbed of possession of your father’s estate; now you may mourn that you have advanced this far in years without wedded love or bridal song. And do not cling to hopes that you will ever meet with such joys. The man, Aegisthus, is not so unthinking


nanthat you are robbed of possession of your father’s estate; now you may mourn that you have advanced this far in years without wedded love or bridal song. And do not cling to hopes that you will ever meet with such joys. The man, Aegisthus, is not so unthinking


nanthat you are robbed of possession of your father’s estate; now you may mourn that you have advanced this far in years without wedded love or bridal song. And do not cling to hopes that you will ever meet with such joys. The man, Aegisthus, is not so unthinking


nanthat you are robbed of possession of your father’s estate; now you may mourn that you have advanced this far in years without wedded love or bridal song. And do not cling to hopes that you will ever meet with such joys. The man, Aegisthus, is not so unthinking


nanthat you are robbed of possession of your father’s estate; now you may mourn that you have advanced this far in years without wedded love or bridal song. And do not cling to hopes that you will ever meet with such joys. The man, Aegisthus, is not so unthinking


nanas ever to permit that offspring should shoot up from you or from me either to be a certain bane for himself. But if you will follow my plans, first you will win praise for piety from our dead father below, and from our brother, too;


nanas ever to permit that offspring should shoot up from you or from me either to be a certain bane for himself. But if you will follow my plans, first you will win praise for piety from our dead father below, and from our brother, too;


nanas ever to permit that offspring should shoot up from you or from me either to be a certain bane for himself. But if you will follow my plans, first you will win praise for piety from our dead father below, and from our brother, too;


nanas ever to permit that offspring should shoot up from you or from me either to be a certain bane for himself. But if you will follow my plans, first you will win praise for piety from our dead father below, and from our brother, too;


nanas ever to permit that offspring should shoot up from you or from me either to be a certain bane for himself. But if you will follow my plans, first you will win praise for piety from our dead father below, and from our brother, too;


nannext, you shall be called hereafter free, just as you were born, and shall find a worthy marriage. For noble natures draw the gaze of all. Then do you not see what fair fame you will procure for yourself and for me, by obeying me?


nannext, you shall be called hereafter free, just as you were born, and shall find a worthy marriage. For noble natures draw the gaze of all. Then do you not see what fair fame you will procure for yourself and for me, by obeying me?


nannext, you shall be called hereafter free, just as you were born, and shall find a worthy marriage. For noble natures draw the gaze of all. Then do you not see what fair fame you will procure for yourself and for me, by obeying me?


nannext, you shall be called hereafter free, just as you were born, and shall find a worthy marriage. For noble natures draw the gaze of all. Then do you not see what fair fame you will procure for yourself and for me, by obeying me?


nannext, you shall be called hereafter free, just as you were born, and shall find a worthy marriage. For noble natures draw the gaze of all. Then do you not see what fair fame you will procure for yourself and for me, by obeying me?


nanWhat citizen or stranger when he sees us will not greet us with praises such as these: Behold these two sisters, my friends! They saved their father’s house, and at a time when their foes were firmly established, they took their lives in their hands and administered bloodshed! Worthy of love is this pair, worthy of reverence from all. At festivals, and wherever the citizenry is assembled, let these two be honored by all men for their manly courage. Thus will every one speak of us


nanWhat citizen or stranger when he sees us will not greet us with praises such as these: Behold these two sisters, my friends! They saved their father’s house, and at a time when their foes were firmly established, they took their lives in their hands and administered bloodshed! Worthy of love is this pair, worthy of reverence from all. At festivals, and wherever the citizenry is assembled, let these two be honored by all men for their manly courage. Thus will every one speak of us


nanWhat citizen or stranger when he sees us will not greet us with praises such as these: Behold these two sisters, my friends! They saved their father’s house, and at a time when their foes were firmly established, they took their lives in their hands and administered bloodshed! Worthy of love is this pair, worthy of reverence from all. At festivals, and wherever the citizenry is assembled, let these two be honored by all men for their manly courage. Thus will every one speak of us


nanWhat citizen or stranger when he sees us will not greet us with praises such as these: Behold these two sisters, my friends! They saved their father’s house, and at a time when their foes were firmly established, they took their lives in their hands and administered bloodshed! Worthy of love is this pair, worthy of reverence from all. At festivals, and wherever the citizenry is assembled, let these two be honored by all men for their manly courage. Thus will every one speak of us


nanWhat citizen or stranger when he sees us will not greet us with praises such as these: Behold these two sisters, my friends! They saved their father’s house, and at a time when their foes were firmly established, they took their lives in their hands and administered bloodshed! Worthy of love is this pair, worthy of reverence from all. At festivals, and wherever the citizenry is assembled, let these two be honored by all men for their manly courage. Thus will every one speak of us


nanWhat citizen or stranger when he sees us will not greet us with praises such as these: Behold these two sisters, my friends! They saved their father’s house, and at a time when their foes were firmly established, they took their lives in their hands and administered bloodshed! Worthy of love is this pair, worthy of reverence from all. At festivals, and wherever the citizenry is assembled, let these two be honored by all men for their manly courage. Thus will every one speak of us


nanWhat citizen or stranger when he sees us will not greet us with praises such as these: Behold these two sisters, my friends! They saved their father’s house, and at a time when their foes were firmly established, they took their lives in their hands and administered bloodshed! Worthy of love is this pair, worthy of reverence from all. At festivals, and wherever the citizenry is assembled, let these two be honored by all men for their manly courage. Thus will every one speak of us


nanWhat citizen or stranger when he sees us will not greet us with praises such as these: Behold these two sisters, my friends! They saved their father’s house, and at a time when their foes were firmly established, they took their lives in their hands and administered bloodshed! Worthy of love is this pair, worthy of reverence from all. At festivals, and wherever the citizenry is assembled, let these two be honored by all men for their manly courage. Thus will every one speak of us


nanWhat citizen or stranger when he sees us will not greet us with praises such as these: Behold these two sisters, my friends! They saved their father’s house, and at a time when their foes were firmly established, they took their lives in their hands and administered bloodshed! Worthy of love is this pair, worthy of reverence from all. At festivals, and wherever the citizenry is assembled, let these two be honored by all men for their manly courage. Thus will every one speak of us


nanWhat citizen or stranger when he sees us will not greet us with praises such as these: Behold these two sisters, my friends! They saved their father’s house, and at a time when their foes were firmly established, they took their lives in their hands and administered bloodshed! Worthy of love is this pair, worthy of reverence from all. At festivals, and wherever the citizenry is assembled, let these two be honored by all men for their manly courage. Thus will every one speak of us


nano that in life and in death our glory shall not fail. Come, dear sister, be persuaded! Toil with our father, share the burden of your brother, put an end to my troubles and an end to yours, keeping in mind that a shameful life brings shame upon the noble-born. Choru


nano that in life and in death our glory shall not fail. Come, dear sister, be persuaded! Toil with our father, share the burden of your brother, put an end to my troubles and an end to yours, keeping in mind that a shameful life brings shame upon the noble-born. Choru


nano that in life and in death our glory shall not fail. Come, dear sister, be persuaded! Toil with our father, share the burden of your brother, put an end to my troubles and an end to yours, keeping in mind that a shameful life brings shame upon the noble-born. Choru


nano that in life and in death our glory shall not fail. Come, dear sister, be persuaded! Toil with our father, share the burden of your brother, put an end to my troubles and an end to yours, keeping in mind that a shameful life brings shame upon the noble-born. Choru


nano that in life and in death our glory shall not fail. Come, dear sister, be persuaded! Toil with our father, share the burden of your brother, put an end to my troubles and an end to yours, keeping in mind that a shameful life brings shame upon the noble-born. Choru


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

2 results
1. Sophocles, Antigone, 10-19, 2, 20-29, 3, 30-39, 4, 40-49, 5, 50-59, 6, 60-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80-89, 9, 90-99, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Sophocles, Electra, 1027-1028, 1036, 939-941, 944-989, 1023 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegisthus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
aeschylus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 77
agamemnon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 77
andreia Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 77
antigone, heroism of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
characters Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
chorus, the, and women Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
chrysothemis, and electra Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
chrysothemis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 77
clytemnestra (sophocles), and electra Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
deception Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
electra, heroism of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
electra Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 498
electra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 498
episodes, of electra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 498
family and gender Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 77
family honour Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 77
heroism, of young women Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
hierarchy, of social function, and women Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
ismene, and antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
justice (dikè), in electra Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
love, of antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
love, of electra Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
loyalty, of young women Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
mother-daughter relationship, the Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 77
orestes, and electra Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
philein/philos' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 77
piety, of antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 735
sisters Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355
stasima, of electra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 498
structure, of electra (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 498
tutor, and orestes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 735
women, young Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 355