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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10409
Sophocles, Antigone, 988-990


nanTEIRESIAS: Princes of Thebes, we have come with linked steps, both served by the eyes of one; for thus, by a guide's help, the blind must walk. CREON: And what, aged Teiresias, are thy tidings? TEIRESIAS: I will tell thee; and do thou hearken to the seer. CREON: Indeed, it has not been my wont to slight thy counsel. TEIRESIAS: Therefore didst thou steer our city's course aright. CREON: I have felt, and can attest, thy benefits. TEIRESIAS: Mark that now, once more, thou standest on fate's fine edge. CREON: What means this? How I shudder at thy message! TEIRESIAS: Thou wilt learn, when thou hearest the warnings of mine art. As I took my place on mine old seat of augury, where all birds have been wont to gather within my ken, I heard a strange voice among them; they were screaming with dire, feverish rage, that drowned their language in jargon; and I knew that they were rending each other with their talons, murderously; the whirr of wings told no doubtful tale. Forthwith, in fear, I essayed burnt-sacrifice on a duly kindled altar: but from my offerings the Fire-god showed no flame; a dank moisture, oozing from the thigh-flesh, trickled forth upon the embers, and smoked, and sputtered; the gall was scattered to the air; and the streaming thighs lay bared of the fat that had been wrapped round them. Such was the failure of the rites by which I vainly asked a sign, as from this boy I learned; for he is my guide, as I am guide to others. And 'tis thy counsel that hath brought this sickness on our State. For the altars of our city and of our hearths have been tainted, one and all, by birds and dogs, with carrion from the hapless corpse, the son of Oidipus: and therefore the gods no more accept prayer and sacrifice at our hands, or the flame of meat-offering; nor doth any bird give a clear sign by its shrill cry, for they have tasted the fatness of a slain man's blood. Think, then, on these things, my son. All men are liable to err; but when an error hath been made, that man is no longer witless or unblest who heals the ill into which he hath fallen, and remains not stubborn. Self-will, we know, incurs the charge of folly. Nay, allow the claim of the dead; stab not the fallen; what prowess is it to slay the slain anew? I have sought thy good, and for thy good I speak: and never is it sweeter to learn from a good counsellor than when he counsels for thine own gain. CREON: Old man, ye all shoot your shafts at me, as archers at the butts;-Ye must needs practise on me with seer-craft also;-aye, the seer-tribe hath long trafficked in me, and made me their merchandise. Gain your gains, drive your trade, if ye list, in the silver-gold of Sardis and the gold of India; but ye shall not hide that man in the grave,-no, though the eagles of Zeus should bear the carrion morsels to their Master's throne-no, not for dread of that defilement will I suffer his burial:-for well I know that no mortal can defile the gods.-But, aged Teiresias, the wisest fall with shameful fall, when they clothe shameful thoughts in fair words, for lucre's sake.


nanPrinces of Thebes , we have come on a shared journey, two scouting the way by the eyes of one.


nanPrinces of Thebes , we have come on a shared journey, two scouting the way by the eyes of one.


nanFor this is the method of travel for the blind, using a guide.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

17 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 1.68-1.120, 1.122 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1.68. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. 1.69. /in hope that he may accept the savour of lambs and unblemished goats, and be willing to ward off the pestilence from us. When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose Calchas son of Thestor, far the best of bird-diviners, who knew the things that were, and that were to be, and that had been before 1.70. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.71. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.72. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.73. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.74. /and who had guided the ships of the Achaeans to Ilios by his own prophetic powers which Phoebus Apollo had bestowed upon him. He with good intent addressed the gathering, and spoke among them:Achilles, dear to Zeus, you bid me declare the wrath of Apollo, the lord who strikes from afar. 1.75. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.76. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.77. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.78. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.79. /Therefore I will speak; but take thought and swear that you will readily defend me with word and with might of hand; for I think I shall anger a man who rules mightily over all the Argives, and whom the Achaeans obey. For mightier is a king, when he is angry at a lesser man. 1.80. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.81. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.82. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.83. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.84. /Even if he swallows down his wrath for that day, yet afterwards he cherishes resentment in his heart till he brings it to fulfillment. Say then, if you will keep me safe. In answer to him spoke swift-footed Achilles:Take heart, and speak out whatever oracle you know; 1.85. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.86. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.87. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.88. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.89. /for by Apollo, dear to Zeus, to whom you, Calchas, pray when you reveal oracles to the Danaans, no one, while I live and have sight on the earth, shall lay heavy hands on you beside the hollow ships, no one of the whole host of the Danaans 1.90. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.91. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.92. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.93. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. 1.94. /not even if you name Agamemnon, who now claims to be far the best of the Achaeans. Then the blameless seer took heart, and spoke:It is not then because of a vow that he finds fault, nor because of a hecatomb, but because of the priest whom Agamemnon dishonoured, and did not release his daughter nor accept the ransom. 1.95. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.96. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.97. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.98. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.99. /For this cause the god who strikes from afar has given woes and will still give them. He will not drive off from the Danaans the loathsome pestilence, until we give back to her dear father the bright-eyed maiden, unbought, unransomed, and lead a sacred hecatomb to Chryse. Then we might appease and persuade him. 1.100. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.101. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.102. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.103. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.104. /When he had thus spoken he sat down, and among them arose the warrior, son of Atreus, wide-ruling Agamemnon, deeply troubled. With rage his black heart was wholly filled, and his eyes were like blazing fire. To Calchas first of all he spoke, and his look threatened evil: 1.105. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.106. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.107. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.108. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.109. / Prophet of evil, never yet have you spoken to me a pleasant thing; ever is evil dear to your heart to prophesy, but a word of good you have never yet spoken, nor brought to pass. And now among the Danaans you claim in prophecy that for this reason the god who strikes from afar brings woes upon them 1.110. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.111. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.112. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.113. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.114. /that I would not accept the glorious ransom for the girl, the daughter of Chryses, since I much prefer to keep her in my home. For certainly I prefer her to Clytemnestra, my wedded wife, since she is not inferior to her, either in form or in stature, or in mind, or in any handiwork. 1.115. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.116. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.117. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.118. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.119. /Yet even so will I give her back, if that is better; I would rather the people be safe than perish. But provide me with a prize of honour forthwith, lest I alone of the Argives be without one, since that would not be proper. For you all see this, that my prize goes elsewhere. 1.120. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned 1.122. /In answer to him spoke swift-footed brilliant Achilles:Most glorious son of Atreus, most covetous of all, how shall the great-hearted Achaeans give you a prize? We know nothing of a hoard of wealth in common store, but whatever we took by pillage from the cities has been apportioned
2. Homer, Odyssey, 10.490-10.495, 11.90-11.151 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

3. Homeric Hymns, To Apollo And The Muses, 40 (8th cent. BCE - 8th cent. BCE)

40. Ida’s dark hills, Phocaea and Scyros
4. Aeschylus, Suppliant Women, 699, 604 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

604. δήμου κρατοῦσα χεὶρ ὅπῃ πληθύνεται. Δαναός
5. Euripides, Fragments, 1013-1015, 1012 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Euripides, Hippolytus, 1013-1015, 1012 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Euripides, Ion, 596-606, 595 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

595. and if I win my way to the highest place in the state, and seek to be some one, I shall be hated by those who have no influence, for superiority is galling; while ’mongst men of worth who could show their wisdom, but are silent, and take no interest in politics
8. Euripides, Orestes, 908-913, 907 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

9. Euripides, Phoenician Women, 550-567, 549 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

549. Why do you honor to excess tyranny, a prosperous injustice
10. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 239-245, 414-416, 442-455, 238 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

11. Sophocles, Ajax, 1224, 542-543, 712, 1223 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

12. Sophocles, Antigone, 1001-1114, 1183-1190, 1320, 159-160, 162-163, 289, 491-492, 50, 578, 843, 885, 940, 944-966, 980-987, 989-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

13. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 657-667, 904-931, 1249 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

14. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 1193-1195, 1207-1210, 1213, 1223-1296, 14, 144-147, 1473, 148, 1480-1489, 149, 1490-1499, 15, 150, 1500-1509, 151, 1510-1514, 1518-1519, 152-159, 16, 160-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-199, 2, 200-215, 223, 227-229, 236-243, 273, 284-289, 298-304, 307, 312-313, 316-317, 320-321, 324-403, 405, 408-425, 429-444, 448-530, 709, 711-712, 863-869, 87, 870-879, 88, 880-923, 928, 946, 964-966, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

15. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 32-35, 31 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

31. and the next night, in turn, drives it out. Children, furthermore, were born to us, whom at the time he looked at only as the farmer looks at a distant field, visiting it only once to sow seed and once to reap. Such was the manner of his life, ever sending him
16. Thucydides, The History of The Peloponnesian War, 2.22.1 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

2.22.1. He, meanwhile, seeing anger and infatuation just now in the ascendant, and confident of his wisdom in refusing a sally, would not call either assembly or meeting of the people, fearing the fatal results of a debate inspired by passion and not by prudence. Accordingly, he addressed himself to the defence of the city, and kept it as quiet as possible
17. Cassius Dio, Roman History, 59.5 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

59.5. 1.  This was the kind of emperor into whose hands the Romans were then delivered. Hence the deeds of Tiberius, though they were felt to have been very harsh, were nevertheless as far superior to those of Gaius as the deeds of Augustus were to those of his successor.,2.  For Tiberius always kept the power in his own hands and used others as agents for carrying out his wishes; whereas Gaius was ruled by the charioteers and gladiators, and was the slave of the actors and others connected with the stage. Indeed, he always kept Apelles, the most famous of the tragedians of that day, with him even in public.,3.  Thus he by himself and they by themselves did without let or hindrance all that such persons would naturally dare to do when given power. Everything that pertained to their art he arranged and settled on the slightest pretext in the most lavish manner, and he compelled the praetors and the consuls to do the same, so that almost every day some performance of the kind was sure to be given.,4.  At first he was but a spectator and listener at these and would take sides for or against various performers like one of the crowd; and one time, when he was vexed with those of opposing tastes, he did not go to the spectacle. But as time went on, he came to imitate, and to contend in many events,,5.  driving chariots, fighting as a gladiator, giving exhibitions of pantomimic dancing, and acting in tragedy. So much for his regular behaviour. And once he sent an urgent summons at night to the leading men of the senate, as if for some important deliberation, and then danced before them.  


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
actors Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203, 506
aeschylus, dramas by\n, eumenides Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
aeschylus, dramas by\n, suppliant women Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
agamemnon, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
agamemnon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
ajax, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
ajax Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
ajax (sophocles), seer in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
anger, vs. wisdom Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
antigone, and chronology Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
antigone (sophocles), a seer in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
antigone (sophocles), and chronology Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
antigone (sophocles), and oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 506, 508
antigone (sophocles), characters in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
antigone (sophocles), political heroes in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
apollo, homeric hymn Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
architectural remains, sanctuaries Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
artemis, at claros Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
artemis, homeric hymn Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
calchas, as the voice of the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
characters, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 506
characters Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203, 336
choruses/choreuts, tragic Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
choruses/choreuts Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
claros Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
council, royal Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 506
creon, as a political hero Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
creon, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
creon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
creon (king of thebes) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
cries, of characters Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 756
death, of oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
delphi Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
episodes, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
episodes, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
eulogy, of human beings Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
eurydice Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
eurysaces Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
extras Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
general parodos, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
gods, and humans Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
hamartanō Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 756
heracles, myth of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
heroes, political Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
hippocrates, on extras Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
humans, and the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
iliad (homer), and chronology Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
interpreters, of the gods Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
ismene, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
ismene Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
jocasta (epicaste), and tiresias Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
judgment, vs. anger Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
kings, as political heroes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
mutes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
myths, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
oedipus, and chronology Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
oedipus, and tiresias Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
oedipus, as a political hero Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
oedipus, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 506, 508
oedipus at colonus (sophocles), actors in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
oedipus at colonus (sophocles), and chronology Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
oedipus the king (sophocles), actors in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
oedipus the king (sophocles), and chronology Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
oedipus the king (sophocles), political heroes in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
oedipus the king (sophocles), seer in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 506, 508
oligarchs/oligarchy Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
oracle, challenges to Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
oresteia (aeschylus), as a trilogy Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
paean, to human beings Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
past, the, and oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 508
pericles, nature of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
persians Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
power, political Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
pylades Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
seers, and creon Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
seers, challenges to Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
sequence, mythic Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
setting, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 506
silence, of minor characters Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
sophocles, dramas by\n, antigone Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sophocles, dramas by\n, trachiniae Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
sophocles (tragic poet) Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
space, and oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 506
spectacle, and extras Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 203
stasima, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
structure, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
structure, of oedipus the king (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 506, 508
teiresias Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
thucydides (politician), on pericles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
time, and tragic myth Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
tiresias, and oedipus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
tiresias, challenges to Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 376
tlepolemus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
tragedy, choruses of Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
trilogy, of tragedies Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
trojan war, first Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131
tyrant, oedipus as Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 336
tyrants/ tyranny Csapo et al., Theatre and Autocracy in the Ancient World (2022) 206
votives' Sweeney, Foundation Myths and Politics in Ancient Ionia (2013) 110
women of trachis, the (sophocles), and chronology Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 131