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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10409
Sophocles, Antigone, 980-989


nanand their birth from their mother stripped of her marriage. But she traced her descent from the ancient line of the Erechtheids, and in far-distant caves she was raised amidst her father’s gusts. She was the child of Boreas


nanand their birth from their mother stripped of her marriage. But she traced her descent from the ancient line of the Erechtheids, and in far-distant caves she was raised amidst her father’s gusts. She was the child of Boreas


nanand their birth from their mother stripped of her marriage. But she traced her descent from the ancient line of the Erechtheids, and in far-distant caves she was raised amidst her father’s gusts. She was the child of Boreas


nanand their birth from their mother stripped of her marriage. But she traced her descent from the ancient line of the Erechtheids, and in far-distant caves she was raised amidst her father’s gusts. She was the child of Boreas


nanand their birth from their mother stripped of her marriage. But she traced her descent from the ancient line of the Erechtheids, and in far-distant caves she was raised amidst her father’s gusts. She was the child of Boreas


nanrunning swift as horses over the steep hills, a daughter of gods. Yet she, too, was assailed by the long-lived Fates, my child.


nanrunning swift as horses over the steep hills, a daughter of gods. Yet she, too, was assailed by the long-lived Fates, my child.


nanrunning swift as horses over the steep hills, a daughter of gods. Yet she, too, was assailed by the long-lived Fates, my child.


nanTEIRESIAS: Princes of Thebes, we have come with linked steps, both served by the eyes of one; for thus, by a guide's help, the blind must walk. CREON: And what, aged Teiresias, are thy tidings? TEIRESIAS: I will tell thee; and do thou hearken to the seer. CREON: Indeed, it has not been my wont to slight thy counsel. TEIRESIAS: Therefore didst thou steer our city's course aright. CREON: I have felt, and can attest, thy benefits. TEIRESIAS: Mark that now, once more, thou standest on fate's fine edge. CREON: What means this? How I shudder at thy message! TEIRESIAS: Thou wilt learn, when thou hearest the warnings of mine art. As I took my place on mine old seat of augury, where all birds have been wont to gather within my ken, I heard a strange voice among them; they were screaming with dire, feverish rage, that drowned their language in jargon; and I knew that they were rending each other with their talons, murderously; the whirr of wings told no doubtful tale. Forthwith, in fear, I essayed burnt-sacrifice on a duly kindled altar: but from my offerings the Fire-god showed no flame; a dank moisture, oozing from the thigh-flesh, trickled forth upon the embers, and smoked, and sputtered; the gall was scattered to the air; and the streaming thighs lay bared of the fat that had been wrapped round them. Such was the failure of the rites by which I vainly asked a sign, as from this boy I learned; for he is my guide, as I am guide to others. And 'tis thy counsel that hath brought this sickness on our State. For the altars of our city and of our hearths have been tainted, one and all, by birds and dogs, with carrion from the hapless corpse, the son of Oidipus: and therefore the gods no more accept prayer and sacrifice at our hands, or the flame of meat-offering; nor doth any bird give a clear sign by its shrill cry, for they have tasted the fatness of a slain man's blood. Think, then, on these things, my son. All men are liable to err; but when an error hath been made, that man is no longer witless or unblest who heals the ill into which he hath fallen, and remains not stubborn. Self-will, we know, incurs the charge of folly. Nay, allow the claim of the dead; stab not the fallen; what prowess is it to slay the slain anew? I have sought thy good, and for thy good I speak: and never is it sweeter to learn from a good counsellor than when he counsels for thine own gain. CREON: Old man, ye all shoot your shafts at me, as archers at the butts;-Ye must needs practise on me with seer-craft also;-aye, the seer-tribe hath long trafficked in me, and made me their merchandise. Gain your gains, drive your trade, if ye list, in the silver-gold of Sardis and the gold of India; but ye shall not hide that man in the grave,-no, though the eagles of Zeus should bear the carrion morsels to their Master's throne-no, not for dread of that defilement will I suffer his burial:-for well I know that no mortal can defile the gods.-But, aged Teiresias, the wisest fall with shameful fall, when they clothe shameful thoughts in fair words, for lucre's sake.


nanPrinces of Thebes , we have come on a shared journey, two scouting the way by the eyes of one.


nanPrinces of Thebes , we have come on a shared journey, two scouting the way by the eyes of one.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 9.458, 14.319, 24.257 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

9.458. /that never should there sit upon his knees a dear child begotten of me; and the gods fulfilled his curse, even Zeus of the nether world and dread Persephone. Then I took counsel to slay him with the sharp sword, but some one of the immortals stayed mine anger, bringing to my mind 14.319. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius 24.257. /Woe is me, that am all unblest, seeing that I begat sons the best in the broad land of Troy, yet of them I avow that not one is left, not godlike Nestor, not Troilus the warrior charioteer, not Hector that was a god among men, neither seemed he as the son of a mortal man, but of a god:
2. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 421 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

421. τὰ τοῦ τυφλοῦ Φοίνικος; οὐ Φοίνικος, οὔ:
3. Euripides, Bacchae, 58 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

58. αἴρεσθε τἀπιχώριʼ ἐν πόλει Φρυγῶν
4. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

229c. Socrates. No, the place is about two or three furlongs farther down, where you cross over to the precinct of Agra ; and there is an altar of Boreas somewhere thereabouts. Phaedrus. I have never noticed it. But, for Heaven’s sake, Socrates, tell me; do you believe this tale is true? Socrates. If I disbelieved, as the wise men do, I should not be extraordinary; then I might give a rational explanation, that a blast of Boreas, the north wind, pushed her off the neighboring rocks as she was playing with Pharmacea, and
5. Sophocles, Antigone, 1001-1114, 289, 944-966, 981-990, 997-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 1248 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Strabo, Geography, 7.3.1 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

7.3.1. Getae As for the southern part of Germany beyond the Albis, the portion which is just contiguous to that river is occupied by the Suevi; then immediately adjoining this is the land of the Getae, which, though narrow at first, stretching as it does along the Ister on its southern side and on the opposite side along the mountain-side of the Hercynian Forest (for the land of the Getae also embraces a part of the mountains), afterwards broadens out towards the north as far as the Tyregetae; but I cannot tell the precise boundaries. It is because of men's ignorance of these regions that any heed has been given to those who created the mythical Rhipaean Mountains and Hyperboreans, and also to all those false statements made by Pytheas the Massalian regarding the country along the ocean, wherein he uses as a screen his scientific knowledge of astronomy and mathematics. So then, those men should be disregarded; in fact, if even Sophocles, when in his role as a tragic poet he speaks of Oreithyia, tells how she was snatched up by Boreas and carried over the whole sea to the ends of the earth and to the sources of night and to the unfoldings of heaven and to the ancient garden of Phoebus, his story can have no bearing on the present inquiry, but should be disregarded, just as it is disregarded by Socrates in the Phaedrus. But let us confine our narrative to what we have learned from history, both ancient and modern.
8. Apollodorus, Epitome, 3.32 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

3.32. ἀνέλκουσι δὲ τὰς ναῦς. μὴ θαρρούντων δὲ τῶν βαρβάρων, Ἀχιλλεὺς ἐνεδρεύσας Τρωίλον ἐν τῷ τοῦ Θυμβραίου Ἀπόλλωνος ἱερῷ φονεύει, καὶ νυκτὸς ἐλθὼν ἐπὶ τὴν πόλιν Λυκάονα λαμβάνει. παραλαβὼν δὲ Ἀχιλλεύς τινας τῶν ἀριστέων τὴν χώραν ἐπόρθει, καὶ παραγίνεται εἰς Ἴδην ἐπὶ τὰς Αἰνείου τοῦ Πριάμου 1 -- βόας. φυγόντος δὲ αὐτοῦ, τοὺς βουκόλους κτείνας καὶ Μήστορα 2 -- τὸν Πριάμου τὰς βόας ἐλαύνει. 3.32. The barbarians showing no courage, Achilles waylaid Troilus and slaughtered him in the sanctuary of Thymbraean Apollo, Compare Proclus in Epicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. G. Kinkel, p. 20 ; Scholiast on Hom. Il. xxiv.257 (where for ὀχευθῆναι it has been proposed to read λοχηθῆναι or λογχευθῆναἰ; Eustathius on Hom. Il. xxiv.251,p. 1348 ; Dio Chrysostom xi. vol. i. p. 189, ed. L. Dindorf ; Tzetzes, Scholiast on Lycophron 307-313 ; Verg. A. 1.474ff. ; Serv. Verg. A. 1.474 ; Scriptores rerum mythicarum Latini, ed. Bode, i. p. 66 (First Vatican Mythographer 210) . Troilus is represented as a youth, but the stories concerning his death are various. According to Eustathius, the lad was exercising his horses in the Thymbraeum or sanctuary of the Thymbraean Apollo, when Achilles killed him with his spear. Tzetzes says that he was a son of Hecuba by Apollo, though nominally by Priam, that he fled from his assailant to the temple of Apollo, and was cut down by Achilles at the altar. There was a prophecy that Troy could not be taken if Troilus should live to the age of twenty (so the First Vatican Mythographer). This may have been the motive of Achilles for slaying the lad. According to Dictys Cretensis iv.9, Troilus was taken prisoner and publicly slaughtered in cold blood by order of Achilles. The indefatigable Sophocles, as usual, wrote a tragedy on the subject. See The Fragments of Sophocles, ed. A. C. Pearson, vol. ii. pp. 253ff. and coming by night to the city he captured Lycaon. Compare Hom. Il. 11.34ff. ; Hom. Il. 13.746ff. Lycaon was captured by Achilles when he was cutting sticks in the orchard of his father Priam. After being sold by his captor into slavery in Lemnos he was ransomed and returned to Troy, but meeting Achilles in battle a few days later, he was ruthlessly slain by him. The story seems to have been told also in the epic Cypria . See Proclus in Epicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. G. Kinkel, p. 20 . Moreover, taking some of the chiefs with him, Achilles laid waste the country, and made his way to Ida to lift the kine of Aeneas. But Aeneas fled, and Achilles killed the neatherds and Nestor, son of Priam, and drove away the kine. Compare Hom. Il. 20.90ff. ; Hom. Il. 20.188ff. ; Proclus in Epicorum Graecorum Fragmenta, ed. G. Kinkel, p. 20 .
9. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 1.38.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

1.38.2. and the first to dwell on the other side of the Rheiti was Crocon, where at the present day is what is called the palace of Crocon. This Crocon the Athenians say married Saesara, daughter of Celeus. Not all of them say this, but only those who belong to the parish of Scambonidae. I could not find the grave of Crocon, but Eleusinians and Athenians agreed in identifying the tomb of Eumolpus. This Eumolpus they say came from Thrace, being the son of Poseidon and Chione. Chione they say was the daughter of the wind Boreas and of Oreithyia. Homer says nothing about the family of Eumolpus, but in his poems styles him “manly.”


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
achilles, and troilus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603
acrisius (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
aeschylus Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
agency Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
akrisios (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
alcmeon, as a secondary myth Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
amphiarus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171, 489
antigone (sophocles), and secondary myths Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
antigone (sophocles), and the drummers (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603
antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
athamas Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 609
athamas (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 609
blindness, of phineuss sons Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 609
boreas Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
cartographic space Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
cave Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
chione Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
cleopatra Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603
danaë Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
danaë (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
destiny Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
dolopians, the (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 609
drummers, the (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603, 609
electra (sophocles), as using secondary myth Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
episodes, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
erichthonios Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
euboea Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
eulogy, of human beings Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
eumolpus Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
fragments, of sophocles works Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603, 609
geography, ancient Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
gods, named and unnamed Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 142
heliades Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
herodotus Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
iliad (homer), and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
iliad (homer), and troilus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603
imprisonment, of antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
ino Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 609
ion of chios Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603
king Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
limit Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
men of larissa, the (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
myth Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
mythical geography Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
myths, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
myths, secondary Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
names, gods named and unnamed Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 142
nephele Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 609
oreithyia Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
orestes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
paean, to human beings Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
perseus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
persians Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
phineus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603
phineus (aeschylus) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 609
phoenix (euripides) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 609
phoenix (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 609
phrixos, phrixus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 609
piety, of antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
plays, lost Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603, 609
sophocles, lost plays and fragments of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603, 609
sophocles Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
stasima, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
structure, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
submission, of antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
tradition, mythic' Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
tradition Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
triptolemos, triptolemus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603
troïlos, troilus (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603
tumpanistai (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 603
vase painting Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
winds Gagne, Cosmography and the Idea of Hyperborea in Ancient Greece (2021), 269
zeus, and danaë Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171