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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10409
Sophocles, Antigone, 965


nanand he angered the Muses who love the flute.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

35 results
1. Hesiod, Works And Days, 1 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

1. Pierian Muses, with your songs of praise
2. Hesiod, Theogony, 53 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

53. Good things to all, and then of Zeus they sing
3. Homer, Iliad, 2.594-2.600, 6.130-6.140, 14.319 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.594. /to get him requital for his strivings and groanings for Helen's sake.And they that dwelt in Pylos and lovely Arene and Thryum, the ford of Alpheius, and fair-founded Aepy, and that had their abodes in Cyparisseïs and Amphigeneia and Pteleos and Helus and Dorium 2.595. /where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him 2.596. /where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him 2.597. /where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him 2.598. /where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him 2.599. /where the Muses met Thamyris the Thracian and made an end of his singing, even as he was journeying from Oechalia, from the house of Eurytus the Oechalian: for he vaunted with boasting that he would conquer, were the Muses themselves to sing against him, the daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis; but they in their wrath maimed him 2.600. /and took from him his wondrous song, and made him forget his minstrelsy;—all these folk again had as leader the horseman, Nestor of Gerenia. And with him were ranged ninety hollow ships.And they that held Arcadia beneath the steep mountain of Cyllene, beside the tomb of Aepytus, where are warriors that fight in close combat; 6.130. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.131. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.132. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.133. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.134. /Nay, for even the son of Dryas, mighty Lycurgus, lived not long, seeing that he strove with heavenly gods—he that on a time drave down over the sacred mount of Nysa the nursing mothers of mad Dionysus; and they all let fall to the ground their wands, smitten with an ox-goad by man-slaying Lycurgus. 6.135. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.136. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.137. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.138. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.139. /But Dionysus fled, and plunged beneath the wave of the sea, and Thetis received him in her bosom, filled with dread, for mighty terror gat hold of him at the man's threatenings. Then against Lycurgus did the gods that live at ease wax wroth, and the son of Cronos made him blind; 6.140. /and he lived not for long, seeing that he was hated of all the immortal gods. So would not I be minded to fight against the blessed gods. But if thou art of men, who eat the fruit of the field, draw nigh, that thou mayest the sooner enter the toils of destruction. Then spake to him the glorious son of Hippolochus: 14.319. /for never yet did desire for goddess or mortal woman so shed itself about me and overmaster the heart within my breast—nay, not when I was seized with love of the wife of Ixion, who bare Peirithous, the peer of the gods in counsel; nor of Danaë of the fair ankles, daughter of Acrisius
4. Homer, Odyssey, 15.418 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

5. Aristophanes, Frogs, 873 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

873. ἀγῶνα κρῖναι τόνδε μουσικώτατα:
6. Aristophanes, The Women Celebrating The Thesmophoria, 135, 994, 134 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

134. καί ς' ὦ νεανίσχ' ὅστις εἶ, κατ' Αἰσχύλον
7. Euripides, Bacchae, 141, 298-301, 307, 410, 453-491, 493-494, 496, 498-502, 506-507, 630-631, 920-922, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1. ἥκω Διὸς παῖς τήνδε Θηβαίων χθόνα 1. I, the son of Zeus, have come to this land of the Thebans—Dionysus, whom once Semele, Kadmos’ daughter, bore, delivered by a lightning-bearing flame. And having taken a mortal form instead of a god’s
8. Euripides, Hecuba, 1267 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1267. ὁ Θρῃξὶ μάντις εἶπε Διόνυσος τάδε. 1267. Dionysus, our Thracian prophet, told me so. Hecuba
9. Euripides, Medea, 1283-1292, 1282 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1282. of all the wives of yore I know but one who laid her hand upon her children dear, even Ino, This is Euripides’ version of the legend, not the usual one; which makes Athamas the father go mad and kill one son, while Ino leaps into the sea with the other. whom the gods did madden in the day
10. Euripides, Rhesus, 971-973, 970 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

970. Alone for ever, in a caverned place
11. Herodotus, Histories, 7.111 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7.111. The Satrae, as far as we know, have never yet been subject to any man; they alone of the Thracians have continued living in freedom to this day; they dwell on high mountains covered with forests of all kinds and snow, and they are excellent warriors. ,It is they who possess the place of divination sacred to Dionysus. This place is in their highest mountains; the Bessi, a clan of the Satrae, are the prophets of the shrine; there is a priestess who utters the oracle, as at Delphi; it is no more complicated here than there.
12. Plato, Apology of Socrates, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

22b. and the rest, thinking that there I should prove by actual test that I was less learned than they. So, taking up the poems of theirs that seemed to me to have been most carefully elaborated by them, I asked them what they meant, that I might at the same time learn something from them. Now I am ashamed to tell you the truth, gentlemen; but still it must be told. For there was hardly a man present, one might say, who would not speak better than they about the poems they themselves had composed. So again in the case of the poets also I presently recognized this
13. Plato, Ion, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

534b. in certain gardens and glades of the Muses—like the bees, and winging the air as these do. And what they tell is true. For a poet is a light and winged and sacred thing, and is unable ever to indite until he has been inspired and put out of his senses, and his mind is no longer in him: every man, whilst he retains possession of that, is powerless to indite a verse or chant an oracle. Seeing then that it is not by art that they compose and utter so many fine things about the deeds of men—
14. Plato, Phaedrus, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

244c. otherwise they would not have connected the very word mania with the noblest of arts, that which foretells the future, by calling it the manic art. No, they gave this name thinking that mania, when it comes by gift of the gods, is a noble thing, but nowadays people call prophecy the mantic art, tastelessly inserting a T in the word. So also, when they gave a name to the investigation of the future which rational persons conduct through observation of birds and by other signs, since they furnish mind (nous)
15. Plato, Symposium, None (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

218b. a Pausanias, an Aristodemus, and an Aristophanes—I need not mention Socrates himself—and all the rest of them; every one of you has had his share of philosophic frenzy and transport, so all of you shall hear. You shall stand up alike for what then was done and for what now is spoken. But the domestics, and all else profane and clownish, must clap the heaviest of doors upon their ears.
16. Sophocles, Ajax, 696-701, 695 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

17. Sophocles, Antigone, 1001-1152, 152-154, 289, 770-771, 943-964, 966, 980-990, 997-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

18. Sophocles, Electra, 1377-1383, 637, 644-645, 657-659, 1376 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

19. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 670-680, 669 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

20. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 161-162, 168-186, 209-215, 160 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

21. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 217-221, 216 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

216. and to the nymphs her neighbors! I am uplifted, I will not spurn the flute—O you master of my heart! Behold, his ivy stirs me! Euoe!
22. Demosthenes, Orations, 18.260 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

23. Plautus, Menaechmi, 836-842, 857-858, 862-868, 870-871, 835 (3rd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

24. Eratosthenes, Catasterismi, 24 (2nd cent. BCE - 2nd cent. BCE)

25. Diodorus Siculus, Historical Library, 3.65.5-3.65.7, 5.50, 5.52 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

3.65.5.  Consequently he sailed across secretly to his army, and then Lycurgus, they say, falling upon the Maenads in the city known as Nysium, slew them all, but Dionysus, bringing his forces over, conquered the Thracians in a battle, and taking Lycurgus alive put out his eyes and inflicted upon him every kind of outrage, and then crucified him. 3.65.6.  Thereupon, out of gratitude to Charops for the aid the man had rendered him, Dionysus made over to him the kingdom of the Thracians and instructed him in the secret rites connected with the initiations; and Oeagrus, the son of Charops, then took over both the kingdom and the initiatory rites which were handed down in the mysteries, the rites which afterwards Orpheus, the son of Oeagrus, who was the superior of all men in natural gifts and education, learned from his father; Orpheus also made many changes in the practices and for that reason the rites which had been established by Dionysus were also called "Orphic. 3.65.7.  But some of the poets, one of whom is Antimachus, state that Lycurgus was king, not of Thrace, but of Arabia, and that the attack upon Dionysus and the Bacchantes was made at the Nysa which is in Arabia. However this may be, Dionysus, they say, punished the impious but treated all other men honourably, and then made his return journey from India to Thebes upon an elephant. 5.50. 1.  Since we have set forth the facts concerning Samothrace, we shall now, in accordance with our plan, discuss Naxos. This island was first called Strongylê and its first settlers were men from Thrace, the reasons for their coming being somewhat as follows.,2.  The myth relates that two sons, Butes and Lycurgus, were born to Boreas, but not by the same mother; and Butes, who was the younger, formed a plot against his brother, and on being discovered he received no punishment from Lycurgus beyond that he was ordered by Lycurgus to gather ships and, together with his accomplices in the plot, to seek out another land in which to make his home.,3.  Consequently Butes, together with the Thracians who were implicated with him, set forth, and making his way through the islands of the Cyclades he seized the island of Strongylê, where he made his home and proceeded to plunder many of those who sailed past the island. And since they had no women they sailed here and there and seized them from the land.,4.  Now some of the islands of the Cyclades had no inhabitants whatsoever and others were sparsely settled; consequently they sailed further, and having been repulsed once from Euboea, they sailed to Thessaly, where Butes and his companions, upon landing, came upon the female devotees of Dionysus as they were celebrating the orgies of the god near Drius, as it is called, in Achaea Phthiotis.,5.  As Butes and his companions rushed at the women, these threw away the sacred objects, and some of them fled for safety to the sea, and others to the mountain called Dius; but Coronis, the myth continues, was seized by Butes and forced to lie with him. And she, in anger at the seizure and at the insolent treatment she had received, called upon Dionysus to lend her his aid. And the god struck Butes with madness, because of which he lost his mind and, throwing himself into a well, met his death.,6.  But the rest of the Thracians seized some of the other women, the most renowned of whom were Iphimedeia, the wife of Aloeus, and Pancratis, her daughter, and taking these women along with them, they sailed off to Strongylê. And in place of Butes the Thracians made Agassamenus king of the island, and to him they united in marriage Pancratis, the daughter of Aloeus, who was a woman of surpassing beauty;,7.  for, before their choice fell on Agassamenus, the most renowned among their leaders, Sicelus and Hecetorus, had quarrelled over Pancratis and had slain each other. And Agassamenus appointed one of his friends his lieutet and united Iphimedeia to him in marriage. 5.52. 1.  The myth which the Naxians have to relate about Dionysus is like this: He was reared, they say, in their country, and for this reason the island has been most dear to him and is called by some Dionysias.,2.  For according to the myth which has been handed down to us, Zeus, on the occasion when Semelê had been slain by his lightning before the time for bearing the child, took the babe and sewed it up within his thigh, and when the appointed time came for its birth, wishing to keep the matter concealed from Hera, he took the babe from his thigh in what is now Naxos and gave it to the Nymphs of the island, Philia, Coronis, and Cleidê, to be reared. The reason Zeus slew Semelê with his lightning before she could give birth to her child was his desire that the babe should be born, not of a mortal woman but of two immortals, and thus should be immortal from its very birth.,3.  And because of the kindness which the inhabitants of Naxos had shown to Dionysus in connection with his rearing they received marks of his gratitude; for the island increased in prosperity and fitted out notable naval forces, and the Naxians were the first to withdraw from the naval forces of Xerxes and to aid in the defeat at sea which the barbarian suffered, and they participated with distinction in the battle of Plataeae. Also the wine of the island possesses an excellence which is peculiarly its own and offers proof of the friendship which the god entertains for the island.
26. Hyginus, Fabulae (Genealogiae), 242, 132 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

27. Ovid, Metamorphoses, 4.1-4.41, 4.389-4.415 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. CE)

28. Strabo, Geography, 10.3.16 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

10.3.16. Also resembling these rites are the Cotytian and the Bendideian rites practiced among the Thracians, among whom the Orphic rites had their beginning. Now the Cotys who is worshipped among the Edonians, and also the instruments used in her rites, are mentioned by Aeschylus; for he says,O adorable Cotys among the Edonians, and ye who hold mountain-ranging instruments; and he mentions immediately afterwards the attendants of Dionysus: one, holding in his hands the bombyces, toilsome work of the turner's chisel, fills full the fingered melody, the call that brings on frenzy, while another causes to resound the bronze-bound cotylae and again,stringed instruments raise their shrill cry, and frightful mimickers from some place unseen bellow like bulls, and the semblance of drums, as of subterranean thunder, rolls along, a terrifying sound; for these rites resemble the Phrygian rites, and it is at least not unlikely that, just as the Phrygians themselves were colonists from Thrace, so also their sacred rites were borrowed from there. Also when they identify Dionysus and the Edonian Lycurgus, they hint at the homogeneity of their sacred rites.
29. Apollodorus, Bibliotheca, 2.2.2, 3.5.1-3.5.2 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.2.2. καὶ γίνεται Ἀκρισίῳ μὲν ἐξ Εὐρυδίκης τῆς Λακεδαίμονος Δανάη, Προίτῳ δὲ ἐκ Σθενεβοίας Λυσίππη καὶ Ἰφινόη καὶ Ἰφιάνασσα. αὗται δὲ ὡς ἐτελειώθησαν, ἐμάνησαν, ὡς μὲν Ἡσίοδός φησιν, ὅτι τὰς Διονύσου τελετὰς οὐ κατεδέχοντο, ὡς δὲ Ἀκουσίλαος λέγει, διότι τὸ τῆς Ἥρας ξόανον ἐξηυτέλισαν. γενόμεναι δὲ ἐμμανεῖς ἐπλανῶντο ἀνὰ τὴν Ἀργείαν ἅπασαν, αὖθις δὲ τὴν Ἀρκαδίαν καὶ τὴν Πελοπόννησον 1 -- διελθοῦσαι μετʼ ἀκοσμίας ἁπάσης διὰ τῆς ἐρημίας ἐτρόχαζον. Μελάμπους δὲ ὁ Ἀμυθάονος καὶ Εἰδομένης τῆς Ἄβαντος, μάντις ὢν καὶ τὴν διὰ φαρμάκων καὶ καθαρμῶν θεραπείαν πρῶτος εὑρηκώς, ὑπισχνεῖται θεραπεύειν τὰς παρθένους, εἰ λάβοι τὸ τρίτον μέρος τῆς δυναστείας. οὐκ ἐπιτρέποντος δὲ Προίτου θεραπεύειν ἐπὶ μισθοῖς τηλικούτοις, ἔτι μᾶλλον ἐμαίνοντο αἱ παρθένοι καὶ προσέτι μετὰ τούτων αἱ λοιπαὶ γυναῖκες· καὶ γὰρ αὗται τὰς οἰκίας ἀπολιποῦσαι τοὺς ἰδίους ἀπώλλυον παῖδας καὶ εἰς τὴν ἐρημίαν ἐφοίτων. προβαινούσης δὲ ἐπὶ πλεῖστον τῆς συμφορᾶς, τοὺς αἰτηθέντας μισθοὺς ὁ Προῖτος ἐδίδου. ὁ δὲ ὑπέσχετο θεραπεύειν ὅταν ἕτερον τοσοῦτον τῆς γῆς ὁ ἀδελφὸς αὐτοῦ λάβῃ Βίας. Προῖτος δὲ εὐλαβηθεὶς μὴ βραδυνούσης τῆς θεραπείας αἰτηθείη καὶ πλεῖον, θεραπεύειν συνεχώρησεν ἐπὶ τούτοις. Μελάμπους δὲ παραλαβὼν τοὺς δυνατωτάτους τῶν νεανιῶν μετʼ ἀλαλαγμοῦ καί τινος ἐνθέου χορείας ἐκ τῶν ὀρῶν αὐτὰς εἰς Σικυῶνα συνεδίωξε. κατὰ δὲ τὸν διωγμὸν ἡ πρεσβυτάτη τῶν θυγατέρων Ἰφινόη μετήλλαξεν· ταῖς δὲ λοιπαῖς τυχούσαις καθαρμῶν σωφρονῆσαι συνέβη. καὶ ταύτας μὲν ἐξέδοτο Προῖτος Μελάμποδι καὶ Βίαντι, παῖδα δʼ ὕστερον ἐγέννησε Μεγαπένθην. 3.5.1. Διόνυσος δὲ εὑρετὴς ἀμπέλου γενόμενος, Ἥρας μανίαν αὐτῷ ἐμβαλούσης περιπλανᾶται Αἴγυπτόν τε καὶ Συρίαν. καὶ τὸ μὲν πρῶτον Πρωτεὺς αὐτὸν ὑποδέχεται βασιλεὺς Αἰγυπτίων, αὖθις δὲ εἰς Κύβελα τῆς Φρυγίας ἀφικνεῖται, κἀκεῖ καθαρθεὶς ὑπὸ Ῥέας καὶ τὰς τελετὰς ἐκμαθών, καὶ λαβὼν παρʼ ἐκείνης τὴν στολήν, ἐπὶ Ἰνδοὺς 1 -- διὰ τῆς Θράκης ἠπείγετο. Λυκοῦργος δὲ παῖς Δρύαντος, Ἠδωνῶν βασιλεύων, οἳ Στρυμόνα ποταμὸν παροικοῦσι, πρῶτος ὑβρίσας ἐξέβαλεν αὐτόν. καὶ Διόνυσος μὲν εἰς θάλασσαν πρὸς Θέτιν τὴν Νηρέως κατέφυγε, Βάκχαι δὲ ἐγένοντο αἰχμάλωτοι καὶ τὸ συνεπόμενον Σατύρων πλῆθος αὐτῷ. αὖθις δὲ αἱ Βάκχαι ἐλύθησαν ἐξαίφνης, Λυκούργῳ δὲ μανίαν ἐνεποίησε 2 -- Διόνυσος. ὁ δὲ μεμηνὼς Δρύαντα τὸν παῖδα, ἀμπέλου νομίζων κλῆμα κόπτειν, πελέκει πλήξας ἀπέκτεινε, καὶ ἀκρωτηριάσας αὐτὸν ἐσωφρόνησε. 1 -- τῆς δὲ γῆς ἀκάρπου μενούσης, ἔχρησεν ὁ θεὸς καρποφορήσειν αὐτήν, ἂν θανατωθῇ Λυκοῦργος. Ἠδωνοὶ δὲ ἀκούσαντες εἰς τὸ Παγγαῖον αὐτὸν ἀπαγαγόντες ὄρος ἔδησαν, κἀκεῖ κατὰ Διονύσου βούλησιν ὑπὸ ἵππων διαφθαρεὶς ἀπέθανε. 3.5.2. διελθὼν δὲ Θρᾴκην καὶ τὴν Ἰνδικὴν ἅπασαν, στήλας ἐκεῖ στήσας 1 -- ἧκεν εἰς Θήβας, καὶ τὰς γυναῖκας ἠνάγκασε καταλιπούσας τὰς οἰκίας βακχεύειν ἐν τῷ Κιθαιρῶνι. Πενθεὺς δὲ γεννηθεὶς ἐξ Ἀγαυῆς Ἐχίονι, παρὰ Κάδμου εἰληφὼς τὴν βασιλείαν, διεκώλυε ταῦτα γίνεσθαι, καὶ παραγενόμενος εἰς Κιθαιρῶνα τῶν Βακχῶν κατάσκοπος ὑπὸ τῆς μητρὸς Ἀγαυῆς κατὰ μανίαν ἐμελίσθη· ἐνόμισε γὰρ αὐτὸν θηρίον εἶναι. δείξας δὲ Θηβαίοις ὅτι θεός ἐστιν, ἧκεν εἰς Ἄργος, κἀκεῖ 2 -- πάλιν οὐ τιμώντων αὐτὸν ἐξέμηνε τὰς γυναῖκας. αἱ δὲ ἐν τοῖς ὄρεσι τοὺς ἐπιμαστιδίους ἔχουσαι 3 -- παῖδας τὰς σάρκας αὐτῶν ἐσιτοῦντο.
30. Aelian, Varia Historia, 3.42 (2nd cent. CE - 3rd cent. CE)

31. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.20.4, 2.22.1 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.20.4. The tomb near this they call that of the maenad Chorea, saying that she was one of the women who joined Dionysus in his expedition against Argos, and that Perseus, being victorious in the battle, put most of the women to the sword. To the rest they gave a common grave, but to Chorea they gave burial apart because of her high rank. 2.22.1. The temple of Hera Anthea (Flowery) is on the right of the sanctuary of Leto, and before it is a grave of women. They were killed in a battle against the Argives under Perseus, having come from the Aegean Islands to help Dionysus in war; for which reason they are surnamed Haliae (Women of the Sea). Facing the tomb of the women is a sanctuary of Demeter, surnamed Pelasgian from Pelasgus, son of Triopas, its founder, and not far from the sanctuary is the grave of Pelasgus.
32. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 21.26-21.92, 21.155-21.169 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

33. Servius, Commentary On The Aeneid, 3.14 (4th cent. CE - 5th cent. CE)

34. Aeschylus, Edonians, 57

35. Orphic Hymns., Fragments, 564



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
acrisius (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
aegisthus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 60
aeschylus, aeschylean (dionysiac) tetralogies/plays Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11
aeschylus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 95
agaue Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 90
agave Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 12
akrisios (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
alcmeon, as a secondary myth Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
altar Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 45, 100
ambrosia (the nymph) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 53
amphiarus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
antigone Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171, 172, 489; Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6
antigone (sophocles), and secondary myths Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171, 172
antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
apollo Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65, 128
apollodorus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 7, 11, 12
arabia Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 58, 184
archaic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
ares Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65
argos, argive Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
aristophanes, frogs Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
askos (the giant) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 58
bacchants, maenads Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 48, 52, 65
bassarids Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 90
bond, g. w. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
butes Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
cannibal, cannibalism Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 90
captivity/imprisonment/enslavement Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 7, 12
cave Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 49, 50, 51; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
charops Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65
chora Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134
chorus χορός, choral Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283, 289
cleopatra Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 46
clytemnestra Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 60
creon Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134
cry, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
cult, cultic acts for specific cults, the corresponding god or place Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289, 303
cult/ritual/worship Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 7, 11, 31, 95
damascus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 58, 184
danae, as paradigm Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
danae Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 46, 47, 48, 51
danaë Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171, 172
danaë (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
dance, dancing, ecstatic, frenzied, maenadic, orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
destiny Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171, 172
diodorus siculus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11
dionysos, dionysos xenos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
dionysos, epiphany Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
dionysos, nurse of Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
dionysos, punishment Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283, 303
dionysos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283, 289, 303
dionysus, and light (lightning) and thunder Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11, 95
dionysus, effeminate/effeminacy of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 12, 31
dionysus, epiphanies/theophany of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11, 12
dionysus, in antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
dionysus, mantic abilities of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31, 95
dionysus, relation with the muses Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 31, 95
dionysus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134
divine status Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 52, 53, 54, 58
dryas Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 7, 11, 12
ecstasy ἔκστασις, ecstatic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
edonoi Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
electra (sophocles), as using secondary myth Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
entheos ἔνθεος Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
enthusiasm ἐνθουσιασμός, enthusiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
epic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
episodes, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
eulogy, of human beings Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
eumelus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6
euripides, bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 11, 95
euripides, heracles Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 12
euripides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
europa, as paradigm Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
evidence (of aeschylus dionysiac tetralogies), iconographic Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 12
evidence (of aeschylus dionysiac tetralogies), mythographic Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 7, 11, 12
evohé εὐαί, εὐαἵ, εὐοἷ Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
eyes, eyesight, blindness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65
fear Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 60
fire Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134
flute Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
frenzy, frenzied Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
frenzy, mania, madness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 46, 99
glaucus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 4
gods, named and unnamed Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 142
great dionysia, city dionysia Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
hades Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134
hallucination/delusion Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11
henderson, j. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
heracles Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
heroines, as paradigms Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
heroines, qualities of Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
homeric hymns, to dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11
horse Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 43, 49
hubris Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6
hyginus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 7, 11, 12
hypsipyle Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
iacchus Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134
iliad (homer), and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171, 172
immortality Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 4, 43, 50, 53, 54, 58
imprisonment, captivity Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 46, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 60, 90, 100
imprisonment, of antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171, 172
initiands/initiates/initiation Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
initiation/rite of passage Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65
interrogation (-scene) Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 7, 12, 31
intertext/intertextual/intertextuality Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 7
io, as paradigm Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
ivy Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
jesus christ Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
kadmos, kadmeian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
kleopatra, as paradigm Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
knossos Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
kotys Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 53
light/lightning Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11
light Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134
lightning Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
lycurgeia, the Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
lycurgus, and pentheus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
lycurgus, in antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 172
lycurgus, myth of Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 7, 11, 12
lycurgus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283, 303; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31
lycurgus (another mythical figure) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 43
lykourgos, as paradigm Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
lyssa/fury Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 184
macedon Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 52
madness Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
madness (mania)/frenzy, and lycurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 7, 11, 12
madness (mania)/frenzy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 12, 95
maenads, maenadic, maenadism Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283, 289
maenads/maenadism Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11
mania μανία, maniacal Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
manliness Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 60
marriage Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134
medea Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
men of larissa, the (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
messengers/messenger-speech Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 12
minyads, daughters of minyas psoloeis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
mountains Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 90
muses Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 46, 65; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 31, 95
music, musical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
myth, mythical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283, 289, 303
myths, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171, 172
myths, secondary Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171, 172
naevius lucurgus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11
names, gods named and unnamed Budelmann, The Language of Sophocles: Communality, Communication, and Involvement (1999) 142
naxos Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 184
nurses of dionysus Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31, 95
nymph Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
nysa, nyseion, nysion Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65, 184
nysa, nyseion Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
oeagrus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65
olbia/pontic olbia, olbian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
on stage Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11
oracle Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 50, 51, 54
orestes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
orgiastic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
orpheus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 29, 60, 65, 90, 134, 211; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 11, 31, 95
paean, to human beings Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
palace Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 90
pan Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
pangaeum Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11, 12
pangaion Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 50, 99, 184
pantheon Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
papyrus-text Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11
paradigms, heroines as Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
parodos, of bacchae Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 12
peek, w. Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
penelope, as paradigm Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
pentheus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 99; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 12
performance Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134
perinthus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
perseus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
phrygia, phrygian Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
phrygia Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 2, 54, 58, 211
pieros Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65
piety, of antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171, 172
pipe Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
plato Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134
polis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
possession, possessed Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
procession Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
proetids, daughters of proetus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
prokris, as paradigm Lyons, Gender and Immortality: Heroines in Ancient Greek Myth and Cult (1997) 37
punishment Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 47, 48, 49, 99; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
reconstruction, of edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 12
resemblances, bassarae/bassarides Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 12
resemblances, choephoroi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6
resemblances, edonoi Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 7, 11, 12, 31
resemblances, myth and dramatic action Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 7, 11, 12
resemblances, seven Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6
resemblances, supplices Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6
resemblances, theban tetralogy Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6
resemblances Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 95
resistence Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 90
rhesus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 50, 51, 53; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 11
rite, ritual Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289, 303
rock Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 46, 50, 51, 52, 53
saboi σάβοι Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
satyrs Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
sea Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 65
semele Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6
sophocles, antigone Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 7
soul Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
sparagmos/dismemberment Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 6, 7
star Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134
stasima, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
structure, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489
submission, of antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171, 172
syria Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 2, 58, 211
teiresias Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 45; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 31, 95
telephus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 52
thamyris Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 45
theater, theatrical Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
thebes, theban Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289, 303
thebes (in boeotia) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 46, 184
thebes (in cilicia) Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 184
theomachist, theomachus Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
thetis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283
thrace Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 2, 53, 54, 58, 65, 211; Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 7, 11, 12, 31, 95
torch, torchlight Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
trachis Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
tradition, mythic Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171, 172
tragedy, tragic Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289, 303
trance Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 289
vase-paintings Xanthaki-Karamanou, 'Dionysiac' Dialogues: Euripides' 'Bacchae', Aeschylus and 'Christus Patiens' (2022) 7, 12
vine Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 52, 53, 128
woman' Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 303
woman Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283, 289
zalmoxis Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 51
zeus, and danaë Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 171
zeus Bednarek, The Myth of Lycurgus in Aeschylus, Naevius, and beyond (2021) 58, 65; Bernabe et al., Redefining Dionysos (2013) 283, 289, 303; Bierl, Time and Space in Ancient Myth, Religion and Culture (2017) 134