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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10409
Sophocles, Antigone, 446-525


nanYou, however, tell me—not at length, but briefly—did you know that an edict had forbidden this?


nanYou, however, tell me—not at length, but briefly—did you know that an edict had forbidden this?


nanI knew it. How could I not? It was public.


nanAnd even so you dared overstep that law?


nanANTIGONE: Yes; for it was not Zeus that had published me that edict; not such are the laws set among men by the justice who dwells with the gods below; nor deemed I that thy decrees were of such force, that a mortal could override the unwritten and unfailing statutes of heaven. For their life is not of today or yesterday, but from all time, and no man knows when they were first put forth. Not through dread of any human pride could I answer to the gods for breaking these. Die I must,-I knew that well (how should I: not?)-even without thy edicts. But if I am to die before my time, I: count that a gain: for when any one lives, as I do, compassed about with evils, can such an one find aught but gain in death? So for me to meet this doom is trifling grief; but if I had suffered my mother's son to lie in death an unburied corpse, that would have grieved me; for this, I am not grieved. And if my present deeds are foolish in thy sight, it may be that a foolish judge arraigns my folly. LEADER OF THE CHORUS: The maid shows herself passionate child of passionate sire, and knows not how to bend before troubles.


nanYes, since it was not Zeus that published me that edict, and since not of that kind are the laws which Justice who dwells with the gods below established among men. Nor did I think that your decrees were of such force, that a mortal could override the unwritten


nanYes, since it was not Zeus that published me that edict, and since not of that kind are the laws which Justice who dwells with the gods below established among men. Nor did I think that your decrees were of such force, that a mortal could override the unwritten


nanYes, since it was not Zeus that published me that edict, and since not of that kind are the laws which Justice who dwells with the gods below established among men. Nor did I think that your decrees were of such force, that a mortal could override the unwritten


nanYes, since it was not Zeus that published me that edict, and since not of that kind are the laws which Justice who dwells with the gods below established among men. Nor did I think that your decrees were of such force, that a mortal could override the unwritten


nanYes, since it was not Zeus that published me that edict, and since not of that kind are the laws which Justice who dwells with the gods below established among men. Nor did I think that your decrees were of such force, that a mortal could override the unwritten


nanand unfailing statutes given us by the gods. For their life is not of today or yesterday, but for all time, and no man knows when they were first put forth. Not for fear of any man’s pride was I about to owe a penalty to the gods for breaking these.


nanand unfailing statutes given us by the gods. For their life is not of today or yesterday, but for all time, and no man knows when they were first put forth. Not for fear of any man’s pride was I about to owe a penalty to the gods for breaking these.


nanand unfailing statutes given us by the gods. For their life is not of today or yesterday, but for all time, and no man knows when they were first put forth. Not for fear of any man’s pride was I about to owe a penalty to the gods for breaking these.


nanand unfailing statutes given us by the gods. For their life is not of today or yesterday, but for all time, and no man knows when they were first put forth. Not for fear of any man’s pride was I about to owe a penalty to the gods for breaking these.


nanand unfailing statutes given us by the gods. For their life is not of today or yesterday, but for all time, and no man knows when they were first put forth. Not for fear of any man’s pride was I about to owe a penalty to the gods for breaking these.


nanDie I must, that I knew well (how could I not?). That is true even without your edicts. But if I am to die before my time, I count that a gain. When anyone lives as I do, surrounded by evils, how can he not carry off gain by dying?


nanDie I must, that I knew well (how could I not?). That is true even without your edicts. But if I am to die before my time, I count that a gain. When anyone lives as I do, surrounded by evils, how can he not carry off gain by dying?


nanDie I must, that I knew well (how could I not?). That is true even without your edicts. But if I am to die before my time, I count that a gain. When anyone lives as I do, surrounded by evils, how can he not carry off gain by dying?


nanDie I must, that I knew well (how could I not?). That is true even without your edicts. But if I am to die before my time, I count that a gain. When anyone lives as I do, surrounded by evils, how can he not carry off gain by dying?


nanDie I must, that I knew well (how could I not?). That is true even without your edicts. But if I am to die before my time, I count that a gain. When anyone lives as I do, surrounded by evils, how can he not carry off gain by dying?


nanSo for me to meet this doom is a grief of no account. But if I had endured that my mother’s son should in death lie an unburied corpse, that would have grieved me. Yet for this, I am not grieved. And if my present actions are foolish in your sight


nanSo for me to meet this doom is a grief of no account. But if I had endured that my mother’s son should in death lie an unburied corpse, that would have grieved me. Yet for this, I am not grieved. And if my present actions are foolish in your sight


nanSo for me to meet this doom is a grief of no account. But if I had endured that my mother’s son should in death lie an unburied corpse, that would have grieved me. Yet for this, I am not grieved. And if my present actions are foolish in your sight


nanSo for me to meet this doom is a grief of no account. But if I had endured that my mother’s son should in death lie an unburied corpse, that would have grieved me. Yet for this, I am not grieved. And if my present actions are foolish in your sight


nanSo for me to meet this doom is a grief of no account. But if I had endured that my mother’s son should in death lie an unburied corpse, that would have grieved me. Yet for this, I am not grieved. And if my present actions are foolish in your sight


nanit may be that it is a fool who accuses me of folly.


nanShe shows herself the wild offspring of a wild father, and does not know how to bend before troubles.


nanShe shows herself the wild offspring of a wild father, and does not know how to bend before troubles.


nanCREON: Yet I would have thee know that o'er-stubborn spirits are most often humbled; 'tis the stiffest iron, baked to hardness in the fire, that thou shalt oftenest see snapped and shivered; and I have known horses that show temper brought to order by a little curb; there is no room for pride when thou art thy neighbour's slave.-This girl was already versed in insolence when she transgressed the laws that had been set forth; and, that done, lo, a second insult,-to vaunt of this, and exult in her deed. Now verily I am no man, she is the man, if this victory shall rest with her, and bring no penalty. No! be she sister's child, or nearer to me in blood than any that worships Zeus Herkeios at the altar of our house,-she and her kinsfolk shall not avoid a doom most dire; for indeed I charge that other with a like share in the plotting of this burial. And summon her-for I saw her e'en now within,-raving, and not mistress of her wits. So oft, before the deed, the mind stands self-convicted in its treason, when folks are plotting mischief in the dark. But verily this, too, is hateful,-when one who hath been caught in wickedness then seeks to make the crime a glory.


nanYet remember that over-hard spirits most often collapse. It is the stiffest iron, baked to


nanYet remember that over-hard spirits most often collapse. It is the stiffest iron, baked to


nanutter hardness in the fire, that you most often see snapped and shivered. And I have witnessed horses with great spirit disciplined by a small bit. For there is no place for pride, when one is his neighbors’ slave.


nanutter hardness in the fire, that you most often see snapped and shivered. And I have witnessed horses with great spirit disciplined by a small bit. For there is no place for pride, when one is his neighbors’ slave.


nanutter hardness in the fire, that you most often see snapped and shivered. And I have witnessed horses with great spirit disciplined by a small bit. For there is no place for pride, when one is his neighbors’ slave.


nanutter hardness in the fire, that you most often see snapped and shivered. And I have witnessed horses with great spirit disciplined by a small bit. For there is no place for pride, when one is his neighbors’ slave.


nanutter hardness in the fire, that you most often see snapped and shivered. And I have witnessed horses with great spirit disciplined by a small bit. For there is no place for pride, when one is his neighbors’ slave.


nanThis girl was already practiced in outrage when she overstepped the published laws. And, that done, this now is a second outrage, that she glories in it and exults in her deed. In truth, then, I am no man, but she is


nanThis girl was already practiced in outrage when she overstepped the published laws. And, that done, this now is a second outrage, that she glories in it and exults in her deed. In truth, then, I am no man, but she is


nanThis girl was already practiced in outrage when she overstepped the published laws. And, that done, this now is a second outrage, that she glories in it and exults in her deed. In truth, then, I am no man, but she is


nanThis girl was already practiced in outrage when she overstepped the published laws. And, that done, this now is a second outrage, that she glories in it and exults in her deed. In truth, then, I am no man, but she is


nanThis girl was already practiced in outrage when she overstepped the published laws. And, that done, this now is a second outrage, that she glories in it and exults in her deed. In truth, then, I am no man, but she is


nanif this victory rests with her and brings no penalty. No! Whether she is my sister’s child, or nearer to me in blood than any of my kin that worship Zeus at the altar of our house, she and her sister will not escape a doom most harsh. For in truth


nanif this victory rests with her and brings no penalty. No! Whether she is my sister’s child, or nearer to me in blood than any of my kin that worship Zeus at the altar of our house, she and her sister will not escape a doom most harsh. For in truth


nanif this victory rests with her and brings no penalty. No! Whether she is my sister’s child, or nearer to me in blood than any of my kin that worship Zeus at the altar of our house, she and her sister will not escape a doom most harsh. For in truth


nanif this victory rests with her and brings no penalty. No! Whether she is my sister’s child, or nearer to me in blood than any of my kin that worship Zeus at the altar of our house, she and her sister will not escape a doom most harsh. For in truth


nanif this victory rests with her and brings no penalty. No! Whether she is my sister’s child, or nearer to me in blood than any of my kin that worship Zeus at the altar of our house, she and her sister will not escape a doom most harsh. For in truth


nanI charge that other with an equal share in the plotting of this burial. Call her out! I saw her inside just now, raving, and not in control of her wits. Before the deed, the mind frequently is convicted of stealthy crimes when conspirators are plotting depravity in the dark.


nanI charge that other with an equal share in the plotting of this burial. Call her out! I saw her inside just now, raving, and not in control of her wits. Before the deed, the mind frequently is convicted of stealthy crimes when conspirators are plotting depravity in the dark.


nanI charge that other with an equal share in the plotting of this burial. Call her out! I saw her inside just now, raving, and not in control of her wits. Before the deed, the mind frequently is convicted of stealthy crimes when conspirators are plotting depravity in the dark.


nanI charge that other with an equal share in the plotting of this burial. Call her out! I saw her inside just now, raving, and not in control of her wits. Before the deed, the mind frequently is convicted of stealthy crimes when conspirators are plotting depravity in the dark.


nanI charge that other with an equal share in the plotting of this burial. Call her out! I saw her inside just now, raving, and not in control of her wits. Before the deed, the mind frequently is convicted of stealthy crimes when conspirators are plotting depravity in the dark.


nanANTIGONE: Wouldst thou do more than take and slay me? CREON: No more, indeed; having that, I have all. ANTIGONE: Why then dost thou delay? In thy discourse there is nought that pleases me,-never may there be!-and so my words must needs be unpleasing to thee. And yet, for glory-whence could I have won a nobler, than by giving burial to mine own brother? All here would own that they thought it well, were not their lips sealed by fear. But royalty, blest in so much besides, hath the power to do and say what it will. CREON: Thou differest from all these Thebans in that view. ANTIGONE: These also share it; but they curb their tongues for thee. CREON: And art thou not ashamed to act apart from them? ANTIGONE: No; there is nothing shameful in piety to a brother. CREON: Was it not a brother, too, that died in the opposite cause? ANTIGONE: Brother by the same mother and the same sire. CREON: Why, then, dost thou render a grace that is impious in his sight?


nanBut, truly, I detest it, too, when one who has been caught in treachery then seeks to make the crime a glory.


nanBut, truly, I detest it, too, when one who has been caught in treachery then seeks to make the crime a glory.


nanWhat more do you want than to capture and kill me?


nanI want nothing else. Having that, I have everything.


nanWhy then do you wait? In none of your maxim


nanis there anything that pleases me—and may there never be! Similarly to you as well my views must be displeasing. And yet, how could I have won a nobler glory than by giving burial to my own brother? All here would admit that they approve


nanis there anything that pleases me—and may there never be! Similarly to you as well my views must be displeasing. And yet, how could I have won a nobler glory than by giving burial to my own brother? All here would admit that they approve


nanis there anything that pleases me—and may there never be! Similarly to you as well my views must be displeasing. And yet, how could I have won a nobler glory than by giving burial to my own brother? All here would admit that they approve


nanis there anything that pleases me—and may there never be! Similarly to you as well my views must be displeasing. And yet, how could I have won a nobler glory than by giving burial to my own brother? All here would admit that they approve


nanis there anything that pleases me—and may there never be! Similarly to you as well my views must be displeasing. And yet, how could I have won a nobler glory than by giving burial to my own brother? All here would admit that they approve


nanif fear did not grip their tongues. But tyranny, blest with so much else, has the power to do and say whatever it pleases.


nanif fear did not grip their tongues. But tyranny, blest with so much else, has the power to do and say whatever it pleases.


nanif fear did not grip their tongues. But tyranny, blest with so much else, has the power to do and say whatever it pleases.


nanYou alone out of all these Thebans see it that way.


nanThey do, too, but for you they hold their tongues.


nanAre you not ashamed that your beliefs differ from theirs?


nanNo, there is nothing shameful in respecting your own flesh and blood.


nanANTIGONE: The dead man will not say that he so deems it. CREON: Yea, if thou makest him but equal in honour with the wicked. ANTIGONE: It was his brother, not his slave, that perished. CREON: Wasting this land; while he fell as its champion. ANTIGONE: Nevertheless, Hades desires these rites. CREON: But the good desires not a like portion with the evil. ANTIGONE: Who knows but this seems blameless in the world below? CREON: A foe is never a friend-not even in death. ANTIGONE: Tis not my nature to join in hating, but in loving. CREON: Pass, then, to the world of the dead, and, it thou must needs love, love them. While I live, no woman shall rule me.


nanWas not he your brother too, who died in the opposite cause?


nanA brother by the same mother and the same father.


nanWhy, then, do you pay a service that is disrespectful to him?


nanThe dead man will not support you in that.


nanYes, he will, if you honor him equally with the wicked one.


nanIt was his brother, not his slave, who died.


nanBut he died ravaging this land, while he fell in its defense.


nanHades craves these rites, nevertheless.


nanBut the good man craves a portion not equal to the evil’s.


nanWho knows but that these actions are pure to those below?


nanYou do not love someone you have hated, not even after death.


nanIt is not my nature to join in hate, but in love.


nanThen, go down to hell and love them


nanif you must. While I live, no woman will rule me.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Aeschylus, Prometheus Bound, 443, 442 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

442. ὑμῖν λέγοιμι· τἀν βροτοῖς δὲ πήματα
2. Euripides, Suppliant Women, 302, 311, 526-527, 561-563, 671-672, 301 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Sophocles, Antigone, 10, 1000-1090, 11, 1192-1199, 12, 1200-1243, 1260-1299, 13, 1300-1353, 14-16, 162-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-189, 19, 190-199, 2, 20, 200-209, 21, 210, 22-24, 249, 25, 250-259, 26, 260-269, 27, 270-277, 28-29, 3, 30, 305, 31-33, 332-339, 34, 340-349, 35, 350-359, 36, 360-369, 37, 370-376, 38, 388-389, 39, 390-394, 4, 40, 407-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-443, 447-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 5, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-525, 53, 531-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-559, 56, 560-569, 57, 570-579, 58, 580-581, 59, 6, 60-63, 631-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-659, 66, 660-669, 67, 670-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 7, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-765, 77-79, 8, 80, 806-809, 81, 810-819, 82, 820-829, 83, 830-839, 84, 840-849, 85, 850-859, 86, 860-869, 87, 870-879, 88, 880-882, 89, 9, 90-99, 998-999, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 484, 485; Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 21; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 21
antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 484, 485
asia, as origin of pelops Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
characters, tragic/mythical, antigone Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278, 288
characters, tragic/mythical, creon, king of thebes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
characters, tragic/mythical, haemon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
characters, tragic/mythical, ismene Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
characters, tragic/mythical, polyneices Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
creon Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 21; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 21
episodes, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 484, 485
eulogy, of human beings Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 484, 485
euripides, and political as opposed to rhetorical tragedy Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
euripides, burial Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 288
fictive founder Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
fictive founders Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
foundation legends, peloponnesus' Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
foundation legends Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
funeral oration Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 124
gods Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 21; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 21
justice, divine Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 485
kērygma Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 21; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 21
law, in antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 485
law Papaioannou et al., Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 21; Papaioannou, Serafim and Demetriou, Rhetoric and Religion in Ancient Greece and Rome (2021) 21
motifs, in postclassical tragedy, burial of the dead Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 288
paean, to human beings Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 484, 485
peloponnesus, foundation legend Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
pelops, as founder Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
pindar Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
sophocles, and rhetoric/tragedy as a rhetorical form Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
stasima, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 484, 485
structure, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 484, 485
thucydides Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 124
underworld, and antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 485