Home About Network of subjects Linked subjects heatmap Book indices included Search by subject Search by reference Browse subjects Browse texts

Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10409
Sophocles, Antigone, 270-278


nanin fear towards the earth. For we did not know how we could argue with him, nor yet prosper, if we did what he said. His argument was that the deed must be reported to you and not hidden. This view prevailed, and so it was that


nanin fear towards the earth. For we did not know how we could argue with him, nor yet prosper, if we did what he said. His argument was that the deed must be reported to you and not hidden. This view prevailed, and so it was that


nanin fear towards the earth. For we did not know how we could argue with him, nor yet prosper, if we did what he said. His argument was that the deed must be reported to you and not hidden. This view prevailed, and so it was that


nanin fear towards the earth. For we did not know how we could argue with him, nor yet prosper, if we did what he said. His argument was that the deed must be reported to you and not hidden. This view prevailed, and so it was that


nanin fear towards the earth. For we did not know how we could argue with him, nor yet prosper, if we did what he said. His argument was that the deed must be reported to you and not hidden. This view prevailed, and so it was that


nanthe lot doomed miserable me to win this prize. So here I stand, as unwelcome to you as I am unwilling, I well know. For no man delights in the bearer of bad news.


nanthe lot doomed miserable me to win this prize. So here I stand, as unwelcome to you as I am unwilling, I well know. For no man delights in the bearer of bad news.


nanthe lot doomed miserable me to win this prize. So here I stand, as unwelcome to you as I am unwilling, I well know. For no man delights in the bearer of bad news.


nanLEADER: O king, my thoughts have long been whispering, can this deed, perchance, be e'en the work of gods? CREON: Cease, ere thy words fill me utterly with wrath, lest thou be found at once an old man and foolish. For thou sayest what is not to be borne, in saying that the gods have care for this corpse. Was it for high reward of trusty service that they sought to hide his nakedness, who came to burn their pillared shrines and sacred treasures, to burn their land, and scatter its laws to the winds? Or dost thou behold the gods honouring the wicked? It cannot be. No! From the first there were certain in the town that muttered against me, chafing at this edict, wagging their heads in secret; and kept not their necks duly under the yoke, like men contented with my sway. 'Tis by them, well I know, that these have been beguiled and bribed to do this deed. Nothing so evil as money ever grew to be current among men. This lays cities low, this drives men from their homes, this trains and warps honest souls till they set themselves to works of shame; this still teaches folk to practise villainies, and to know every godless deed. But all the men who wrought this thing for hire have made it sure that, soon or late, they shall pay the price. Now, as Zeus still hath my reverence, know this-I tell it thee on my oath:-If ye find not the very author of this burial, and produce him before mine eyes, death alone shall not be enough for you, till first, hung up alive, ye have revealed this outrage,-that henceforth ye may thieve with better knowledge whence lucre should be won, and learn that it is not well to love gain from every source. For thou wilt find that ill-gotten pelf brings more men to ruin than to weal. GUARD: May I speak? Or shall I just turn and go? CREON: Knowest thou not that even now thy voice offends? GUARD: Is thy smart in the ears, or in the soul? CREON: And why wouldst thou define the seat of my pain? GUARD: The doer vexes thy mind, but I, thine ears. CREON: Ah, thou art a born babbler, 'tis well seen. GUARD: May be, but never the doer of this deed.


nanMy king, my thoughts have long been deliberating whether this deed is somehow the work of gods?


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

9 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.100-2.108 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.100. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.101. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.102. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.103. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.104. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.105. /and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. 2.106. /and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. 2.107. /and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. 2.108. /and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos.
2. Tyrtaeus, Fragments, 2 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

3. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 1.24, 1.36-1.38, 1.93, 9.9 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Aristophanes, Acharnians, 115 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

115. ̔Ελληνικόν γ' ἐπένευσαν ἅνδρες οὑτοιί
5. Aristophanes, Wasps, 1110 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1110. ξυμβεβυσμένοι πυκνόν, νεύοντες ἐς τὴν γῆν, μόλις
6. Sophocles, Ajax, 1292 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Sophocles, Antigone, 10, 100, 1000-1009, 101, 1010-1019, 102, 1020-1029, 103, 1030-1039, 104, 1040-1049, 105, 1050-1059, 106, 1060-1069, 107, 1070-1079, 108, 1080-1089, 109, 1090-1092, 11, 110-119, 1192-1199, 12, 120, 1200-1209, 121, 1210-1219, 122, 1220-1229, 123, 1230-1239, 124, 1240-1243, 125-126, 1260-1269, 127, 1270-1279, 128, 1280-1289, 129, 1290-1299, 13, 130, 1300-1309, 131, 1310-1319, 132, 1320-1329, 133, 1330-1339, 134, 1340-1349, 135, 1350-1353, 136-139, 14, 140, 15, 155, 159, 16, 160, 162-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-189, 19, 190-199, 2, 20, 200-209, 21, 210-214, 216, 22, 220, 23-24, 249, 25, 250-259, 26, 260-269, 27, 271-278, 28, 282-289, 29, 290-299, 3, 30, 300-301, 304-309, 31, 310-312, 32, 322, 327-329, 33-34, 342, 35-39, 4, 40, 407-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440-443, 446-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 5, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-525, 53, 531-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-559, 56, 560-569, 57, 570-579, 58, 580-589, 59, 590-599, 6, 60, 600-603, 61-63, 631-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-659, 66, 660-669, 67, 670-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 7, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-765, 77-79, 8, 80, 806-809, 81, 810-819, 82, 820-829, 83, 830-839, 84, 840-849, 85, 850-859, 86, 860-869, 87, 870-879, 88, 880-882, 89, 9, 90-99, 998-999, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Plutarch, Theseus, 3.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

9. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.22.3, 2.26.2 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.22.3. Now that the Tantalus is buried here who was the son of Thyestes or Broteas (both accounts are given) and married Clytaemnestra before Agamemnon did, I will not gainsay; but the grave of him who legend says was son of Zeus and Pluto—it is worth seeing—is on Mount Sipylus. I know because I saw it. Moreover, no constraint came upon him to flee from Sipylus, such as afterwards forced Pelops to run away when Ilus the Phrygian launched an army against him. But I must pursue the inquiry no further. The ritual performed at the pit hard by they say was instituted by Nicostratus, a native. Even at the present day they throw into the pit burning torches in honor of the Maid who is daughter of Demeter. 2.26.2. He went to Athens with his people and dwelt there, while Deiphontes and the Argives took possession of Epidauria. These on the death of Temenus seceded from the other Argives; Deiphontes and Hyrnetho through hatred of the sons of Temenus, and the army with them, because it respected Deiphontes and Hyrnetho more than Ceisus and his brothers. Epidaurus, who gave the land its name, was, the Eleans say, a son of Pelops but, according to Argive opinion and the poem the Great Eoeae, A poem attributed to Hesiod. the father of Epidaurus was Argus, son of Zeus, while the Epidaurians maintain that Epidaurus was the child of Apollo.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483
antigone (antigone) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 103
antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483
asia, as origin of pelops Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
characters, tragic/mythical, antigone Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
characters, tragic/mythical, creon, king of thebes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
characters, tragic/mythical, haemon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
characters, tragic/mythical, ismene Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
characters, tragic/mythical, polyneices Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
continuities, mainly greek Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 61
dikaiopolis Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 61
episodes, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483
euripides, and political as opposed to rhetorical tragedy Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
fictive founder Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
fictive founders Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
foundation legends, peloponnesus' Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
foundation legends Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
general parodos, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483
ground (antigone), modern greek Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 61
ground (antigone) Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 61
horkos (oath) Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 103
kreon, and antigone Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 61
no, gestures for Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 61
nodding Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 61
peloponnesus, foundation legend Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
pelops, as founder Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
pindar Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
sophocles, and rhetoric/tragedy as a rhetorical form Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
structure, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483
theseus, oaths sworn by Sommerstein and Torrance, Oaths and Swearing in Ancient Greece (2014) 103
yes, gestures for Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 61
νευ\x1b ω, and compound variants Boeghold, When a Gesture Was Expected: A Selection of Examples from Archaic and Classical Greek Literature (2022) 61