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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10409
Sophocles, Antigone, 162-169


nanCREON: Sirs, the vessel of our State, after being tossed on wild waves, hath once more been safely steadied by the gods: and ye, out of all the folk, have been called apart by my summons, because I knew, first of all, how true and constant was your reverence for the royal power of Laius; how, again, when Oidipus was ruler of our land, and when he had perished, your steadfast loyalty still upheld their children. Since, then, his sons have fallen in one day by a twofold doom,-each smitten by the other, each stained with a brother's blood,-I now possess the throne and all its powers, by nearness of kinship to the dead. No man can be fully known, in soul and spirit and mind, until he hath been seen versed in rule and law-giving. For if any, being supreme guide of the State, cleaves not to the best counsels, but, through some fear, keeps his lips locked, I hold, and have ever held, him most base; and if any makes a friend of more account than his fatherland, that man hath no place in my regard. For I-be Zeus my witness, who sees all things always-would not be silent if I saw ruin, instead of safety, coming to the citizens; nor would I ever deem the country's foe a friend to myself; remembering this, that our country is the ship that bears us safe, and that only while she prospers in our voyage can we make true friends. Such are the rules by which I guard this city's greatness. And in accord with them is the edict which I have now published to the folk touching the sons of Oidipus;-that Eteocles, who hath fallen fighting for our city, in all renown of arms, shall be entombed, and crowned with every rite that follows the noblest dead to their rest. But for his brother, Polyneices,-who came back from exile, and sought to consume utterly with fire the city of his fathers and the shrines of his fathers' gods,-sought to taste of kindred blood, and to lead the remnant into slavery;-touching this man, it hath been proclaimed to our people that none shall grace him with sepulture or lament, but leave him unburied, a corpse for birds and dogs to eat, a ghastly sight of shame. Such the spirit of my dealing; and never, by deed of mine, shall the wicked stand in honour before the just; but whoso hath good will to Thebes, he shall be honoured of me, in his life and in his death. LEADER OF THE CHORUS: Such is thy pleasure, Creon, son of Menoeceus, touching this city's foe, and its friend; and thou hast power, I ween, to take what order thou wilt, both for the dead, and for all us who live. CREON: See, then, that ye be guardians of the mandate. LEADER: Lay the burden of this task on some younger man. CREON: Nay, watchers of the corpse have been found. LEADER: What, then, is this further charge that thou wouldst give? CREON: That ye side not with the breakers of these commands. LEADER: No man is so foolish that he is enamoured of death. CREON: In sooth, that is the meed; yet lucre hath oft ruined men through their hopes. (A GUARD enters from the spectators' left.)


nanMy fellow citizens! First, the gods, after tossing the fate of our city on wild waves, have once more righted it. Second, I have ordered you through my messengers to come here


nanMy fellow citizens! First, the gods, after tossing the fate of our city on wild waves, have once more righted it. Second, I have ordered you through my messengers to come here


nanMy fellow citizens! First, the gods, after tossing the fate of our city on wild waves, have once more righted it. Second, I have ordered you through my messengers to come here


nanapart from all the rest, because I knew, first of all, how constant was your reverence for the power of the throne of Laius; how, again, you were reverent, when Oedipus was guiding our city; and lastly, how, when he was dead, you still maintained loyal thoughts towards his children.


nanapart from all the rest, because I knew, first of all, how constant was your reverence for the power of the throne of Laius; how, again, you were reverent, when Oedipus was guiding our city; and lastly, how, when he was dead, you still maintained loyal thoughts towards his children.


nanapart from all the rest, because I knew, first of all, how constant was your reverence for the power of the throne of Laius; how, again, you were reverent, when Oedipus was guiding our city; and lastly, how, when he was dead, you still maintained loyal thoughts towards his children.


nanapart from all the rest, because I knew, first of all, how constant was your reverence for the power of the throne of Laius; how, again, you were reverent, when Oedipus was guiding our city; and lastly, how, when he was dead, you still maintained loyal thoughts towards his children.


nanapart from all the rest, because I knew, first of all, how constant was your reverence for the power of the throne of Laius; how, again, you were reverent, when Oedipus was guiding our city; and lastly, how, when he was dead, you still maintained loyal thoughts towards his children.


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

5 results
1. Sophocles, Ajax, 278-279, 489-490, 507-509, 542-543, 185 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Sophocles, Antigone, 10, 1000-1092, 11, 1183-1190, 1192-1199, 12, 1200-1243, 1260-1299, 13, 1300-1353, 14-15, 155, 159, 16, 160, 163-169, 17, 170-179, 18, 180-189, 19, 190-199, 2, 20, 200-209, 21, 210-214, 216, 22, 220, 223-229, 23, 230-232, 24, 249, 25, 250-259, 26, 260-269, 27, 270-278, 28, 282-289, 29, 290-299, 3, 30, 300-301, 304-309, 31, 310-312, 32, 322, 327-329, 33-36, 368-369, 37, 370, 38-39, 4, 40, 407-409, 41, 410-419, 42, 420-429, 43, 430-439, 44, 440, 446-449, 45, 450-459, 46, 460-469, 47, 470-479, 48, 480-489, 49, 490-499, 5, 50, 500-509, 51, 510-519, 52, 520-525, 53, 531-539, 54, 540-549, 55, 550-559, 56, 560-569, 57, 570-579, 58, 580-581, 583-585, 59, 594-599, 6, 60, 600-603, 61-63, 631-639, 64, 640-649, 65, 650-659, 66, 660-669, 67, 670-679, 68, 680-689, 69, 690-699, 7, 70, 700-709, 71, 710-719, 72, 720-729, 73, 730-739, 74, 740-749, 75, 750-759, 76, 760-765, 77-79, 8, 80, 806-809, 81, 810-819, 82, 820-829, 83, 830-839, 84, 840-849, 85, 850-859, 86, 860-869, 87, 870-879, 88, 880-882, 89, 9, 90-98, 988-989, 99, 990, 998-999, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

3. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 1249 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Xenophon, Hellenica, 1.7.22 (5th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)

1.7.22. Or if you do not wish to do this, try them under the following law, which applies to temple-robbers and traitors: namely, if anyone shall be a traitor to the state or shall steal sacred property, he shall be tried before a court, and if he be convicted, he shall not be buried in Attica, and his property shall be confiscated.
5. Demosthenes, Orations, 43.57 (4th cent. BCE - 4th cent. BCE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
agamemnon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
ajax Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 431, 509
antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483
apolōla Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 758
asia, as origin of pelops Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
audience, theatre Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 122
boundaries, and civic space Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 90, 91
burial, athens vs. s. ant. Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 91
characters, tragic/mythical, antigone Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
characters, tragic/mythical, creon, king of thebes Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
characters, tragic/mythical, haemon Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
characters, tragic/mythical, ismene Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
characters, tragic/mythical, polyneices Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
community, civic Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 51
creon, and boundaries Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 90, 91
creon, and steadfast minds Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 99, 100
creon, and straightness Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 90, 91, 98
creon, on gender differentiation Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 90, 100
creon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
dialogue, sung Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 758
ehrenberg, v. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 122
electra, and orestes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 758
episodes, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483
euripides, and political as opposed to rhetorical tragedy Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
eurydice Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
eurysaces Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
fictive founder Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
fictive founders Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
foundation legends, peloponnesus' Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
foundation legends Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
fratricide and category-confusion Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 98, 99
gender, differentiation Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 90, 100
general parodos, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483
haemon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 431
ismene, juxtaposing oneness and twoness Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 99
ismene Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
laius Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 122
margins, marginal, marginality Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 98
miasma terminology, in s. ant. Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 98, 99, 100
neoptolemus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 431
orestes, and electra Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 758
orthos Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 90, 91, 98
peloponnesus, foundation legend Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
pelops, as founder Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
persians Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
pindar Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
politics, counterprosecution Martin, Divine Talk: Religious Argumentation in Demosthenes (2009) 51
pollution, and categorisation Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 98, 99, 100
polyneices Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 122
poseidon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 431
pylades Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 509
recognition scene Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 758
sophocles, and rhetoric/tragedy as a rhetorical form Liapis and Petrides, Greek Tragedy After the Fifth Century: A Survey from ca (2019) 278
space, in s. ant, civic Meinel, Pollution and Crisis in Greek Tragedy (2015) 90, 91
structure, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483
tecmessa Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 431