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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10409
Sophocles, Antigone, 1091-1156


nanThe man is gone, my king, leaving dire prophecies behind. And for all the time that I have had this hair on my head, now white, once dark, I know that he has never been a false prophet to our city.


nanThe man is gone, my king, leaving dire prophecies behind. And for all the time that I have had this hair on my head, now white, once dark, I know that he has never been a false prophet to our city.


nanThe man is gone, my king, leaving dire prophecies behind. And for all the time that I have had this hair on my head, now white, once dark, I know that he has never been a false prophet to our city.


nanThe man is gone, my king, leaving dire prophecies behind. And for all the time that I have had this hair on my head, now white, once dark, I know that he has never been a false prophet to our city.


nanI, too, know it well, and my mind is troubled. To yield is terrible, but, to resist, to strike my pride with ruin—this, too, inspires terror.


nanI, too, know it well, and my mind is troubled. To yield is terrible, but, to resist, to strike my pride with ruin—this, too, inspires terror.


nanI, too, know it well, and my mind is troubled. To yield is terrible, but, to resist, to strike my pride with ruin—this, too, inspires terror.


nanLEADER: Son of Menoeceus, it behoves thee to take wise counsel. CREON: What should I do then? Speak and I will obey. LEADER: Go thou, and free the maiden from her rocky chamber, and make a tomb for the unburied dead. CREON: And this is thy counsel? Thou wouldst have me yield? LEADER: Yea, King, and with all speed; for swift harms from the gods cut short the folly of men. CREON: Ah me, 'tis hard, but I resign my cherished resolve,-I obey. We must not wage a vain war with destiny. LEADER: Go, thou, and do these things; leave them not to others. CREON: Even as I am I'll go:-on, on, my servants, each and all of you,-take axes in your hands, and hasten to the ground that ye see yonder! Since our judgment hath taken this turn, I will be present to unloose her, as myself bound her. My heart misgives me, 'tis best to keep the established laws, even to life's end. (CREON and his servants hasten out on the spectators' left.) CHORUS (singing) O thou of many names, glory of the Cadmeian bride, offspring of loud-thundering Zeus! thou who watchest over famed Italia, and reignest, where all guests are welcomed, in the sheltered plain of Eleusinian Deo! O Bacchus, dweller in Thebes, mother-city of Bacchants, by the softly-gliding stream of Ismenus, on the soil where the fierce dragon's teeth were sown! antistrophe 1 Thou hast been seen where torch-flames glare through smoke, above the crests of the twin peaks, where move the Corycian nymphs, thy votaries, hard by Castalia's stream. Thou comest from the ivy-mantled slopes of Nysa's hills, and from the shore green with many-clustered vines, while thy name is lifted up on strains of more than mortal power, as thou visitest the ways of Thebes: Thebes, of all cities, thou holdest first in honour, thou and thy mother whom the lightning smote; and now, when all our people is captive to a violent plague, come thou with healing feet over the Parnassian height, or over the moaning strait! antistrophe 2 O thou with whom the stars rejoice as they move, the stars whose breath is fire; O master of the voices of the night; son begotten of Zeus; appear, O king, with thine attendant Thyiads, who in night-long frenzy dance before thee, the giver of good gifts, Iacchus!


nanThe moment, Creon, requires that you reason wisely.


nanWhat should I do, then? Speak, and I will obey.


nanGo and free the girl from her hollowed chamber. Then raise a tomb for the unburied dead.


nanGo and free the girl from her hollowed chamber. Then raise a tomb for the unburied dead.


nanAnd you recommend this? You think that I should yield?


nanYes, my king, and with all possible speed. For harms sent from the gods swiftly cut short the follies of men.


nanYes, my king, and with all possible speed. For harms sent from the gods swiftly cut short the follies of men.


nanAh, it is a struggle, but I depart from my heart’s resolve and obey. We must not wage vain wars with necessity.


nanAh, it is a struggle, but I depart from my heart’s resolve and obey. We must not wage vain wars with necessity.


nanGo, do these things and do not leave their performance to others.


nanRight away I will go. Go, go, my servants, each and all of you! Take axes in your hands


nanRight away I will go. Go, go, my servants, each and all of you! Take axes in your hands


nanand hurry to that place there in view! But since my judgment has taken this turn, I will be there to set her free, as I myself confined her. I am held by the fear that it is best to keep the established laws to life’s very end.


nanand hurry to that place there in view! But since my judgment has taken this turn, I will be there to set her free, as I myself confined her. I am held by the fear that it is best to keep the established laws to life’s very end.


nanand hurry to that place there in view! But since my judgment has taken this turn, I will be there to set her free, as I myself confined her. I am held by the fear that it is best to keep the established laws to life’s very end.


nanand hurry to that place there in view! But since my judgment has taken this turn, I will be there to set her free, as I myself confined her. I am held by the fear that it is best to keep the established laws to life’s very end.


nanand hurry to that place there in view! But since my judgment has taken this turn, I will be there to set her free, as I myself confined her. I am held by the fear that it is best to keep the established laws to life’s very end.


nanGod of many names, glory of the Cadmeian bride and offspring of loud-thundering Zeus, you who watch over far-famed Italy and reign


nanGod of many names, glory of the Cadmeian bride and offspring of loud-thundering Zeus, you who watch over far-famed Italy and reign


nanGod of many names, glory of the Cadmeian bride and offspring of loud-thundering Zeus, you who watch over far-famed Italy and reign


nanGod of many names, glory of the Cadmeian bride and offspring of loud-thundering Zeus, you who watch over far-famed Italy and reign


nanGod of many names, glory of the Cadmeian bride and offspring of loud-thundering Zeus, you who watch over far-famed Italy and reign


nanin the valleys of Eleusinian Deo where all find welcome! O Bacchus, denizen of Thebes , the mother-city of your Bacchants, dweller by the wet stream of Ismenus on the soil


nanin the valleys of Eleusinian Deo where all find welcome! O Bacchus, denizen of Thebes , the mother-city of your Bacchants, dweller by the wet stream of Ismenus on the soil


nanin the valleys of Eleusinian Deo where all find welcome! O Bacchus, denizen of Thebes , the mother-city of your Bacchants, dweller by the wet stream of Ismenus on the soil


nanin the valleys of Eleusinian Deo where all find welcome! O Bacchus, denizen of Thebes , the mother-city of your Bacchants, dweller by the wet stream of Ismenus on the soil


nanin the valleys of Eleusinian Deo where all find welcome! O Bacchus, denizen of Thebes , the mother-city of your Bacchants, dweller by the wet stream of Ismenus on the soil


nanof the sowing of the savage dragon’s teeth!


nanThe smoky glare of torches sees you above the cliffs of the twin peaks, where the Corycian nymphs move inspired by your godhead


nanThe smoky glare of torches sees you above the cliffs of the twin peaks, where the Corycian nymphs move inspired by your godhead


nanThe smoky glare of torches sees you above the cliffs of the twin peaks, where the Corycian nymphs move inspired by your godhead


nanThe smoky glare of torches sees you above the cliffs of the twin peaks, where the Corycian nymphs move inspired by your godhead


nanand Castalia’s stream sees you, too. The ivy-mantled slopes of Nysa ’s hills and the shore green with many-clustered vines send you, when accompanied by the cries of your divine words


nanand Castalia’s stream sees you, too. The ivy-mantled slopes of Nysa ’s hills and the shore green with many-clustered vines send you, when accompanied by the cries of your divine words


nanand Castalia’s stream sees you, too. The ivy-mantled slopes of Nysa ’s hills and the shore green with many-clustered vines send you, when accompanied by the cries of your divine words


nanand Castalia’s stream sees you, too. The ivy-mantled slopes of Nysa ’s hills and the shore green with many-clustered vines send you, when accompanied by the cries of your divine words


nanand Castalia’s stream sees you, too. The ivy-mantled slopes of Nysa ’s hills and the shore green with many-clustered vines send you, when accompanied by the cries of your divine words


nanyou visit the avenues of Thebes .


nanyou visit the avenues of Thebes .


nanThebes of all cities you hold foremost in honor, together with your lightning-struck mother.


nanThebes of all cities you hold foremost in honor, together with your lightning-struck mother.


nanThebes of all cities you hold foremost in honor, together with your lightning-struck mother.


nanAnd now when the whole city is held subject to a violent plague, come, we ask, with purifying feet over steep Parnassus


nanAnd now when the whole city is held subject to a violent plague, come, we ask, with purifying feet over steep Parnassus


nanAnd now when the whole city is held subject to a violent plague, come, we ask, with purifying feet over steep Parnassus


nanAnd now when the whole city is held subject to a violent plague, come, we ask, with purifying feet over steep Parnassus


nanAnd now when the whole city is held subject to a violent plague, come, we ask, with purifying feet over steep Parnassus


nanor over the groaning straits!


nanO Leader of the chorus of the stars whose breath is fire, overseer of the chants in the night, son begotten of Zeus


nanO Leader of the chorus of the stars whose breath is fire, overseer of the chants in the night, son begotten of Zeus


nanO Leader of the chorus of the stars whose breath is fire, overseer of the chants in the night, son begotten of Zeus


nanO Leader of the chorus of the stars whose breath is fire, overseer of the chants in the night, son begotten of Zeus


nanappear, my king, with your attendant Thyiads, who in night-long frenzy dance and sing you as Iacchus the Giver!


nanappear, my king, with your attendant Thyiads, who in night-long frenzy dance and sing you as Iacchus the Giver!


nanappear, my king, with your attendant Thyiads, who in night-long frenzy dance and sing you as Iacchus the Giver!


nan(Enter MESSENGER, on the spectators' left.) MESSENGER: Dwellers by the house of Cadmus and of Amphion, there is no estate of mortal life that I would ever praise or blame as settled. Fortune raises and Fortune humbles the lucky or unlucky from day today, and no one can prophesy to men concerning those things which are established. For Creon was blest once, as I count bliss; he had saved this land of Cadmus from its foes; he was clothed with sole dominion in the land; he reigned, the glorious sire of princely children. And now all hath been lost. For when a man hath forfeited his pleasures, I count him not as living,-I hold him but a breathing corpse. Heap up riches in thy house, if thou wilt; live in kingly state; yet, if there be no gladness therewith, I would not give the shadow of a vapour for all the rest, compared with joy. LEADER OF THE CHORUS: And what is this new grief that thou hast to tell for our princes? MESSENGER: Death; and the living are guilty for the dead. LEADER: And who is the slayer? Who the stricken? Speak. MESSENGER: Haemon hath perished; his blood hath been shed by no stranger. LEADER: By his father's hand, or by his own? MESSENGER: By his own, in wrath with his sire for the murder. LEADER: O prophet, how true, then, hast thou proved thy word! MESSENGER: These things stand thus; ye must consider of the rest. LEADER: Lo, I see the hapless Eurydice, Creon's wife, approaching; she comes from the house by chance, haply,-or because she knows the tidings of her son. (Enter EURYDICE from the palace.)


nanappear, my king, with your attendant Thyiads, who in night-long frenzy dance and sing you as Iacchus the Giver!


nanappear, my king, with your attendant Thyiads, who in night-long frenzy dance and sing you as Iacchus the Giver!


nanNeighbors of the house of Cadmus and of Amphion, there is no station of human life that I would ever praise or blame as being settled. Fortune sets upright and Fortune sinks the lucky and unlucky from day to day


nanNeighbors of the house of Cadmus and of Amphion, there is no station of human life that I would ever praise or blame as being settled. Fortune sets upright and Fortune sinks the lucky and unlucky from day to day


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

3 results
1. Sophocles, Antigone, 1001-1090, 1092-1156, 1167-1171, 1183-1190, 1192-1243, 1260-1353, 155, 159-160, 162-214, 216, 220, 249-278, 282-301, 304-312, 322, 327-329, 509, 61-64, 780, 872-875, 883, 944-966, 980-990, 997-1000 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

2. Apollonius of Rhodes, Argonautica, 1.268-1.292 (3rd cent. BCE - 3rd cent. BCE)

1.268. μήτηρ δʼ ὡς τὰ πρῶτʼ ἐπεχεύατο πήχεε παιδί 1.269. ὧς ἔχετο κλαίουσʼ ἀδινώτερον, ἠύτε κούρη 1.270. οἰόθεν ἀσπασίως πολιὴν τροφὸν ἀμφιπεσοῦσα 1.271. μύρεται, ᾗ οὐκ εἰσὶν ἔτʼ ἄλλοι κηδεμονῆες 1.272. ἀλλʼ ὑπὸ μητρυιῇ βίοτον βαρὺν ἡγηλάζει· 1.273. καί ἑ νέον πολέεσσιν ὀνείδεσιν ἐστυφέλιξεν 1.274. τῇ δέ τʼ ὀδυρομένῃ δέδεται κέαρ ἔνδοθεν ἄτῃ 1.275. οὐδʼ ἔχει ἐκφλύξαι τόσσον γόον, ὅσσον ὀρεχθεῖ· 1.276. ὧς ἀδινὸν κλαίεσκεν ἑὸν παῖδʼ ἀγκὰς ἔχουσα 1.277. Ἀλκιμέδη, καὶ τοῖον ἔπος φάτο κηδοσύνῃσιν· 1.278. ‘αἴθʼ ὄφελον κεῖνʼ ἦμαρ, ὅτʼ ἐξειπόντος ἄκουσα 1.279. δειλὴ ἐγὼ Πελίαο κακὴν βασιλῆος ἐφετμήν 1.280. αὐτίκʼ ἀπὸ ψυχὴν μεθέμεν, κηδέων τε λαθέσθαι 1.281. ὄφρʼ αὐτός με τεῇσι φίλαις ταρχύσαο χερσίν 1.282. τέκνον ἐμόν· τὸ γὰρ οἶον ἔην ἔτι λοιπὸν ἐέλδωρ 1.283. ἐκ σέθεν, ἄλλα δὲ πάντα πάλαι θρεπτήρια πέσσω. 1.284. νῦν γε μὲν ἡ τὸ πάροιθεν Ἀχαιιάδεσσιν ἀγητὴ 1.285. δμωὶς ὅπως κενεοῖσι λελείψομαι ἐν μεγάροισιν 1.286. σεῖο πόθῳ μινύθουσα δυσάμμορος, ᾧ ἔπι πολλὴν 1.287. ἀγλαΐην καὶ κῦδος ἔχον πάρος, ᾧ ἔπι μούνῳ 1.288. μίτρην πρῶτον ἔλυσα καὶ ὕστατον. ἔξοχα γάρ μοι 1.289. Εἰλείθυια θεὰ πολέος ἐμέγηρε τόκοιο. 1.290. ᾤ μοι ἐμῆς ἄτης· τὸ μὲν οὐδʼ ὅσον, οὐδʼ ἐν ὀνείρῳ 1.291. ὠισάμην, εἰ Φρίξος ἐμοὶ κακὸν ἔσσετʼ ἀλύξας.’ 1.292. ὧς ἥγε στενάχουσα κινύρετο· ταὶ δὲ γυναῖκες
3. Statius, Thebais, 1.324-1.335, 10.699-10.711 (1st cent. CE - 1st cent. CE)



Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aeson Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
ajax Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111
alcimede Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
antigone Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74; Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483, 489, 490; Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111, 112
antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483, 489, 490
apollonius rhodius Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
argos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111
belief/s, as traits of character Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
chrysothemis Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111
creon, feminized Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
creon, theb. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
creon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111, 112
cries, of characters Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 756
electra Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111
emotions, stoic views Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
episodes, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483, 489, 490
eteocles, theb. Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
eulogy, of human beings Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489, 490
exodos, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 490
fear, associated with women/the feminine Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
fear, emasculating emotion Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
general parodos, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483
haemon Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111
hamartanō Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 756
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111
hero, sophoclean Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111, 112
ismene Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111, 112
jocasta Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111
knox, b.m.w. Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 112
menoeceus Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
paean, to human beings Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489, 490
philoctetes Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111
polyneices Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111
rome, and civil war Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
stasima, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 489, 490
structure, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 483, 489, 490
tecmessa Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111
thebes, and civil war Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74
tiresias/teiresias' Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 112
tiresias/teiresias Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 111
tiresias Agri, Reading Fear in Flavian Epic: Emotion, Power, and Stoicism (2022) 74