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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10409
Sophocles, Antigone, 104


nanShaft of the sun, fairest light of all that have dawned on Thebes of the seven gates, you have shone forth at last, eye of golden day, advancing over Dirce’s streams!


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

11 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 2.100-2.108, 2.494-2.510 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

2.100. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.101. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.102. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.103. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.104. /ceasing from their clamour. Then among them lord Agamemnon uprose, bearing in his hands the sceptre which Hephaestus had wrought with toil. Hephaestus gave it to king Zeus, son of Cronos, and Zeus gave it to the messenger Argeïphontes; and Hermes, the lord, gave it to Pelops, driver of horses 2.105. /and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. 2.106. /and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. 2.107. /and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. 2.108. /and Pelops in turn gave it to Atreus, shepherd of the host; and Atreus at his death left it to Thyestes, rich in flocks, and Thyestes again left it to Agamemnon to bear, that so he might be lord of many isles and of all Argos. 2.494. /and a voice unwearying, and though the heart within me were of bronze, did not the Muses of Olympus, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis, call to my mind all them that came beneath Ilios. Now will I tell the captains of the ships and the ships in their order.of the Boeotians Peneleos and Leïtus were captains 2.495. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.496. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.497. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.498. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.499. /and Arcesilaus and Prothoënor and Clonius; these were they that dwelt in Hyria and rocky Aulis and Schoenus and Scolus and Eteonus with its many ridges, Thespeia, Graea, and spacious Mycalessus; and that dwelt about Harma and Eilesium and Erythrae; 2.500. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.501. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.502. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.503. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.504. /and that held Eleon and Hyle and Peteon, Ocalea and Medeon, the well-built citadel, Copae, Eutresis, and Thisbe, the haunt of doves; that dwelt in Coroneia and grassy Haliartus, and that held Plataea and dwelt in Glisas; 2.505. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.506. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.507. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.508. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.509. /that held lower Thebe, the well-built citadel, and holy Onchestus, the bright grove of Poseidon; and that held Arne, rich in vines, and Mideia and sacred Nisa and Anthedon on the seaboard. of these there came fifty ships, and on board of each 2.510. /went young men of the Boeotians an hundred and twenty.
2. Tyrtaeus, Fragments, 2 (7th cent. BCE - 6th cent. BCE)

3. Aeschylus, Seven Against Thebes, 1006-1078, 165, 273-274, 1005 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

1005. ἰὼ ἰὼ δυστόνων κακῶν, ἄναξ. Ἀντιγόνη 1005. Ah I pity your grievous suffering, my king. Antigone
4. Pindar, Olympian Odes, 1.24, 1.36-1.38, 1.93, 9.9 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Pindar, Pythian Odes, 11.11 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Sophocles, Ajax, 693-705, 1292 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Sophocles, Antigone, 10, 100-103, 105-109, 11, 110-119, 12, 120-126, 1261-1269, 127, 1270-1279, 128, 1280-1289, 129, 1290-1299, 13, 130, 1300-1309, 131, 1310-1319, 132, 1320-1329, 133, 1330-1339, 134, 1340-1346, 135-139, 14, 140-149, 15, 150-159, 16, 160-161, 165-169, 17, 170-174, 18-19, 2, 20-26, 269, 27, 270, 28-29, 293-299, 3, 30, 300-301, 31-34, 342, 35-39, 4, 40-44, 441-443, 45-46, 469, 47, 470-472, 48-49, 5, 50-51, 511, 52-58, 582-589, 59, 590-599, 6, 60, 600-603, 61-69, 7, 70-79, 8, 80, 806-809, 81, 810-819, 82, 820-829, 83, 830-839, 84, 840-849, 85, 850-859, 86, 860-869, 87, 870-879, 88, 880-882, 89, 9, 90-99, 1 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

8. Strabo, Geography, 9.1.20, 9.2.25, 9.5.6 (1st cent. BCE - 1st cent. BCE)

9.1.20. It suffices, then, to add thus much: According to Philochorus, when the country was being devastated, both from the sea by the Carians, and from the land by the Boeotians, who were called Aonians, Cecrops first settled the multitude in twelve cities, the names of which were Cecropia, Tetrapolis, Epacria, Deceleia, Eleusis, Aphidna (also called Aphidnae, in the plural), Thoricus, Brauron, Cytherus, Sphettus, Cephisia. And at a later time Theseus is said to have united the twelve into one city, that of today. Now in earlier times the Athenians were ruled by kings; and then they changed to a democracy; but tyrants assailed them, Peisistratus and his sons; and later an oligarchy arose, not only that of the four hundred, but also that of the thirty tyrants, who were set over them by the Lacedemonians; of these they easily rid themselves, and preserved the democracy until the Roman conquest. For even though they were molested for a short time by the Macedonian kings, and were even forced to obey them, they at least kept the general type of their government the same. And some say that they were actually best governed at that time, during the ten years when Cassander reigned over the Macedonians. For although this man is reputed to have been rather tyrannical in his dealings with all others, yet he was kindly disposed towards the Athenians, once he had reduced the city to subjection; for he placed over the citizens Demetrius of Phalerum, one of the disciples of Theophrastus the philosopher, who not only did not destroy the democracy but even improved it, as is made clear in the Memoirs which Demetrius wrote concerning this government. But the envy and hatred felt for oligarchy was so strong that, after the death of Cassander, Demetrius was forced to flee to Egypt; and the statues of him, more than three hundred, were pulled down by the insurgents and melted, and some writers go on to say that they were made into chamber pots. Be that as it may, the Romans, seeing that the Athenians had a democratic government when they took them over, preserved their autonomy and liberty. But when the Mithridatic War came on, tyrants were placed over them, whomever the king wished. The most powerful of these, Aristion, who violently oppressed the city, was punished by Sulla the Roman commander when he took this city by siege, though he pardoned the city itself; and to this day it is free and held in honor among the Romans. 9.2.25. The Thespiae of today is by Antimachus spelled Thespeia; for there are many names of places which are used in both ways, both in the singular and in the plural, just as there are many which are used both in the masculine and in the feminine, whereas there are others which are used in either one or the other number only. Thespiae is a city near Mt. Helicon, lying somewhat to the south of it; and both it and Helicon are situated on the Crisaean Gulf. It has a seaport Creusa, also called Creusis. In the Thespian territory, in the part lying towards Helicon, is Ascre, the native city of Hesiod; it is situated on the right of Helicon, on a high and rugged place, and is about forty stadia distant from Thespiae. This city Hesiod himself has satirized in verses which allude to his father, because at an earlier time his father changed his abode to this place from the Aeolian Cyme, saying: And he settled near Helicon in a wretched village, Ascre, which is bad in winter, oppressive in summer, and pleasant at no time. Helicon is contiguous to Phocis in its northerly parts, and to a slight extent also in its westerly parts, in the region of the last harbor belonging to Phocis, the harbor which, from the fact in the case, is called Mychus (inmost depth); for, speaking generally, it is above this harbor of the Crisaean Gulf that Helicon and Ascre, and also Thespiae and its seaport Creusa, are situated. This is also considered the deepest recess of the Crisaean Gulf, and in general of the Corinthian Gulf. The length of the coastline from the harbor Mychus to Creusa is ninety stadia; and the length from Creusa as far as the promontory called Holmiae is one hundred and twenty; and hence Pagae and Oinoe, of which I have already spoken, are situated in the deepest recess of the gulf. Now Helicon, not far distant from Parnassus, rivals it both in height and in circuit; for both are rocky and covered with snow, and their circuit comprises no large extent of territory. Here are the sanctuary of the Muses and Hippu-crene and the cave of the nymphs called the Leibethrides; and from this fact one might infer that those who consecrated Helicon to the Muses were Thracians, the same who dedicated Pieris and Leibethrum and Pimpleia to the same goddesses. The Thracians used to be called Pieres, but, now that they have disappeared, the Macedonians hold these places. It has been said that Thracians once settled in this part of Boeotia, having overpowered the Boeotians, as did also Pelasgians and other barbarians. Now in earlier times Thespiae was well known because of the Eros of Praxiteles, which was sculptured by him and dedicated by Glycera the courtesan (she had received it as a gift from the artist) to the Thespians, since she was a native of the place. Now in earlier times travellers would go up to Thespeia, a city otherwise not worth seeing, to see the Eros; and at present it and Tanagra are the only Boeotian cities that still endure; but of all the rest only ruins and names are left.
9. Appian, The Mithridatic Wars, 30 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

10. Plutarch, Theseus, 3.1 (1st cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

11. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 2.22.3, 2.26.2, 9.8.4, 9.30 (2nd cent. CE - 2nd cent. CE)

2.22.3. Now that the Tantalus is buried here who was the son of Thyestes or Broteas (both accounts are given) and married Clytaemnestra before Agamemnon did, I will not gainsay; but the grave of him who legend says was son of Zeus and Pluto—it is worth seeing—is on Mount Sipylus. I know because I saw it. Moreover, no constraint came upon him to flee from Sipylus, such as afterwards forced Pelops to run away when Ilus the Phrygian launched an army against him. But I must pursue the inquiry no further. The ritual performed at the pit hard by they say was instituted by Nicostratus, a native. Even at the present day they throw into the pit burning torches in honor of the Maid who is daughter of Demeter. 2.26.2. He went to Athens with his people and dwelt there, while Deiphontes and the Argives took possession of Epidauria. These on the death of Temenus seceded from the other Argives; Deiphontes and Hyrnetho through hatred of the sons of Temenus, and the army with them, because it respected Deiphontes and Hyrnetho more than Ceisus and his brothers. Epidaurus, who gave the land its name, was, the Eleans say, a son of Pelops but, according to Argive opinion and the poem the Great Eoeae, A poem attributed to Hesiod. the father of Epidaurus was Argus, son of Zeus, while the Epidaurians maintain that Epidaurus was the child of Apollo. 9.8.4. In the circuit of the ancient wall of Thebes were gates seven in number, and these remain to-day. One got its name, I learned, from Electra, the sister of Cadmus, and another, the Proetidian, from a native of Thebes . He was Proetus, but I found it difficult to discover his date and lineage. The Neistan gate, they say, got its name for the following reason. The last of the harp's strings they call nete, and Amphion invented it, they say, at this gate. I have also heard that the son of Zethus, the brother of Amphion, was named Neis, and that after him was this gate called.


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
action, continuity of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 254
actors Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 482
antigone Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151, 482
antigone (euripides) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 482
antigone (sophocles), and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
antigone (sophocles), chorus in Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 254, 255
antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 482
aristophanes, and antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 482
asia, as origin of pelops Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
athens, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
athens, athenians Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
athens Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 296
attica Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
aulos Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 296
bacchylides, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
battle of delium Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
boeotia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
burial, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 254, 255
catalogue of ships Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
characters, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 482
chorus, the, and the plot Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 254
cithaeron, mt. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
copae Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
creon, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 254, 255
democracy, in athens, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
dionysos Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
epinician Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 296
euripides, and antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 482
euripides, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
fictive founder Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
fictive founders Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
foundation legends, peloponnesus' Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
foundation legends Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
general parodos, and the plot Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 254, 255
general parodos, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 482
helicon, mt. Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
heracles Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 296
hercules, hero Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
humans, hymn concerning Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 255
hymn, on humans Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 255
ismenus river Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
isthmos/isthmus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
liber, father Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
mithridates vi Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
musculus aquaticum, muses, sanctuary of Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
myths, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
oedipus, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
oedipus at colonus (sophocles), and geography Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
oedipus the king (sophocles), and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
oropus Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
paian/paean Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 296
peloponnesian war, and the image of thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
peloponnesus, foundation legend Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
pelops, as founder Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
periplous, periploi Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
phthiotis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
pindar, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
pindar Gruen, Rethinking the Other in Antiquity (2011) 227
plataea, and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
plot, and speaking and singing Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 254, 255
polynices (oedipuss son), body of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 254, 255
polynices (oedipuss son) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
prologue, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 482
sequence, mythic, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 482
seven against thebes (aeschylus), and antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 482
seven against thebes (aeschylus), and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
space, and the chorus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 254
stasima, and the plot Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 254, 255
structure, of antigone (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 482
sunium, cape Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
suppliants, the (euripides), and thebes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
thebes, mythic image of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 151
thebes in boeotia Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
thebes in egypt Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203
thebes in phthiotis Roller, A Guide to the Geography of Pliny the Elder (2022) 203