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Tiresias: The Ancient Mediterranean Religions Source Database



10408
Sophocles, Ajax, 589-595


nanYou annoy me too much. Do you not know


nanthat I no longer owe any service to the gods? Tecmessa


nanHush, no impiety! Ajax


nanYou will not listen? Ajax


nanYes, because I am afraid, my king! Ajax To the Attendants.


nanIn the name of the gods, be softened! Ajax


nanif you plan so late to begin schooling my temper. Ajax is shut into the tent. Exit Tecmessa with Eurysaces. Choru


Intertexts (texts cited often on the same page as the searched text):

7 results
1. Homer, Iliad, 6.407-6.493, 6.496 (8th cent. BCE - 7th cent. BCE)

6.407. /but Andromache came close to his side weeping, and clasped his hand and spake to him, saying:Ah, my husband, this prowess of thine will be thy doom, neither hast thou any pity for thine infant child nor for hapless me that soon shall be thy widow; for soon will the Achaeans 6.408. /but Andromache came close to his side weeping, and clasped his hand and spake to him, saying:Ah, my husband, this prowess of thine will be thy doom, neither hast thou any pity for thine infant child nor for hapless me that soon shall be thy widow; for soon will the Achaeans 6.409. /but Andromache came close to his side weeping, and clasped his hand and spake to him, saying:Ah, my husband, this prowess of thine will be thy doom, neither hast thou any pity for thine infant child nor for hapless me that soon shall be thy widow; for soon will the Achaeans 6.410. /all set upon thee and slay thee. But for me it were better to go down to the grave if I lose thee, for nevermore shall any comfort be mine, when thou hast met thy fate, but only woes. Neither father have I nor queenly mother. 6.411. /all set upon thee and slay thee. But for me it were better to go down to the grave if I lose thee, for nevermore shall any comfort be mine, when thou hast met thy fate, but only woes. Neither father have I nor queenly mother. 6.412. /all set upon thee and slay thee. But for me it were better to go down to the grave if I lose thee, for nevermore shall any comfort be mine, when thou hast met thy fate, but only woes. Neither father have I nor queenly mother. 6.413. /all set upon thee and slay thee. But for me it were better to go down to the grave if I lose thee, for nevermore shall any comfort be mine, when thou hast met thy fate, but only woes. Neither father have I nor queenly mother. 6.414. /all set upon thee and slay thee. But for me it were better to go down to the grave if I lose thee, for nevermore shall any comfort be mine, when thou hast met thy fate, but only woes. Neither father have I nor queenly mother. My father verily goodly Achilles slew 6.415. /for utterly laid he waste the well-peopled city of the Cilicians, even Thebe of lofty gates. He slew Eëtion, yet he despoiled him not, for his soul had awe of that; but he burnt him in his armour, richly dight, and heaped over him a barrow; and all about were elm-trees planted by nymphs of the mountain, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis. 6.416. /for utterly laid he waste the well-peopled city of the Cilicians, even Thebe of lofty gates. He slew Eëtion, yet he despoiled him not, for his soul had awe of that; but he burnt him in his armour, richly dight, and heaped over him a barrow; and all about were elm-trees planted by nymphs of the mountain, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis. 6.417. /for utterly laid he waste the well-peopled city of the Cilicians, even Thebe of lofty gates. He slew Eëtion, yet he despoiled him not, for his soul had awe of that; but he burnt him in his armour, richly dight, and heaped over him a barrow; and all about were elm-trees planted by nymphs of the mountain, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis. 6.418. /for utterly laid he waste the well-peopled city of the Cilicians, even Thebe of lofty gates. He slew Eëtion, yet he despoiled him not, for his soul had awe of that; but he burnt him in his armour, richly dight, and heaped over him a barrow; and all about were elm-trees planted by nymphs of the mountain, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis. 6.419. /for utterly laid he waste the well-peopled city of the Cilicians, even Thebe of lofty gates. He slew Eëtion, yet he despoiled him not, for his soul had awe of that; but he burnt him in his armour, richly dight, and heaped over him a barrow; and all about were elm-trees planted by nymphs of the mountain, daughters of Zeus that beareth the aegis. 6.420. /And the seven brothers that were mine in our halls, all these on the selfsame day entered into the house of Hades, for all were slain of swift-footed, goodly Achilles, amid their kine of shambling gait and their white-fleeced sheep. 6.421. /And the seven brothers that were mine in our halls, all these on the selfsame day entered into the house of Hades, for all were slain of swift-footed, goodly Achilles, amid their kine of shambling gait and their white-fleeced sheep. 6.422. /And the seven brothers that were mine in our halls, all these on the selfsame day entered into the house of Hades, for all were slain of swift-footed, goodly Achilles, amid their kine of shambling gait and their white-fleeced sheep. 6.423. /And the seven brothers that were mine in our halls, all these on the selfsame day entered into the house of Hades, for all were slain of swift-footed, goodly Achilles, amid their kine of shambling gait and their white-fleeced sheep. 6.424. /And the seven brothers that were mine in our halls, all these on the selfsame day entered into the house of Hades, for all were slain of swift-footed, goodly Achilles, amid their kine of shambling gait and their white-fleeced sheep. 6.425. /And my mother, that was queen beneath wooded Placus, her brought he hither with the rest of the spoil, but thereafter set her free, when he had taken ransom past counting; and in her father's halls Artemis the archer slew her. Nay, Hector, thou art to me father and queenly mother 6.426. /And my mother, that was queen beneath wooded Placus, her brought he hither with the rest of the spoil, but thereafter set her free, when he had taken ransom past counting; and in her father's halls Artemis the archer slew her. Nay, Hector, thou art to me father and queenly mother 6.427. /And my mother, that was queen beneath wooded Placus, her brought he hither with the rest of the spoil, but thereafter set her free, when he had taken ransom past counting; and in her father's halls Artemis the archer slew her. Nay, Hector, thou art to me father and queenly mother 6.428. /And my mother, that was queen beneath wooded Placus, her brought he hither with the rest of the spoil, but thereafter set her free, when he had taken ransom past counting; and in her father's halls Artemis the archer slew her. Nay, Hector, thou art to me father and queenly mother 6.429. /And my mother, that was queen beneath wooded Placus, her brought he hither with the rest of the spoil, but thereafter set her free, when he had taken ransom past counting; and in her father's halls Artemis the archer slew her. Nay, Hector, thou art to me father and queenly mother 6.430. /thou art brother, and thou art my stalwart husband. Come now, have pity, and remain here on the wall, lest thou make thy child an orphan and thy wife a widow. And for thy host, stay it by the wild fig-tree, where the city may best be scaled, and the wall is open to assault. 6.431. /thou art brother, and thou art my stalwart husband. Come now, have pity, and remain here on the wall, lest thou make thy child an orphan and thy wife a widow. And for thy host, stay it by the wild fig-tree, where the city may best be scaled, and the wall is open to assault. 6.432. /thou art brother, and thou art my stalwart husband. Come now, have pity, and remain here on the wall, lest thou make thy child an orphan and thy wife a widow. And for thy host, stay it by the wild fig-tree, where the city may best be scaled, and the wall is open to assault. 6.433. /thou art brother, and thou art my stalwart husband. Come now, have pity, and remain here on the wall, lest thou make thy child an orphan and thy wife a widow. And for thy host, stay it by the wild fig-tree, where the city may best be scaled, and the wall is open to assault. 6.434. /thou art brother, and thou art my stalwart husband. Come now, have pity, and remain here on the wall, lest thou make thy child an orphan and thy wife a widow. And for thy host, stay it by the wild fig-tree, where the city may best be scaled, and the wall is open to assault. 6.435. /For thrice at this point came the most valiant in company with the twain Aiantes and glorious Idomeneus and the sons of Atreus and the valiant son of Tydeus, and made essay to enter: whether it be that one well-skilled in soothsaying told them, or haply their own spirit urgeth and biddeth them thereto. 6.436. /For thrice at this point came the most valiant in company with the twain Aiantes and glorious Idomeneus and the sons of Atreus and the valiant son of Tydeus, and made essay to enter: whether it be that one well-skilled in soothsaying told them, or haply their own spirit urgeth and biddeth them thereto. 6.437. /For thrice at this point came the most valiant in company with the twain Aiantes and glorious Idomeneus and the sons of Atreus and the valiant son of Tydeus, and made essay to enter: whether it be that one well-skilled in soothsaying told them, or haply their own spirit urgeth and biddeth them thereto. 6.438. /For thrice at this point came the most valiant in company with the twain Aiantes and glorious Idomeneus and the sons of Atreus and the valiant son of Tydeus, and made essay to enter: whether it be that one well-skilled in soothsaying told them, or haply their own spirit urgeth and biddeth them thereto. 6.439. /For thrice at this point came the most valiant in company with the twain Aiantes and glorious Idomeneus and the sons of Atreus and the valiant son of Tydeus, and made essay to enter: whether it be that one well-skilled in soothsaying told them, or haply their own spirit urgeth and biddeth them thereto. 6.440. /Then spake to her great Hector of the flashing helm:Woman, I too take thought of all this, but wondrously have I shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives, with trailing robes, if like a coward I skulk apart from the battle. Nor doth mine own heart suffer it, seeing I have learnt to be valiant 6.441. /Then spake to her great Hector of the flashing helm:Woman, I too take thought of all this, but wondrously have I shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives, with trailing robes, if like a coward I skulk apart from the battle. Nor doth mine own heart suffer it, seeing I have learnt to be valiant 6.442. /Then spake to her great Hector of the flashing helm:Woman, I too take thought of all this, but wondrously have I shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives, with trailing robes, if like a coward I skulk apart from the battle. Nor doth mine own heart suffer it, seeing I have learnt to be valiant 6.443. /Then spake to her great Hector of the flashing helm:Woman, I too take thought of all this, but wondrously have I shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives, with trailing robes, if like a coward I skulk apart from the battle. Nor doth mine own heart suffer it, seeing I have learnt to be valiant 6.444. /Then spake to her great Hector of the flashing helm:Woman, I too take thought of all this, but wondrously have I shame of the Trojans, and the Trojans' wives, with trailing robes, if like a coward I skulk apart from the battle. Nor doth mine own heart suffer it, seeing I have learnt to be valiant 6.445. /always and to fight amid the foremost Trojans, striving to win my father's great glory and mine own. For of a surety know I this in heart and soul: the day shall come when sacred Ilios shall be laid low, and Priam, and the people of Priam with goodly spear of ash. 6.446. /always and to fight amid the foremost Trojans, striving to win my father's great glory and mine own. For of a surety know I this in heart and soul: the day shall come when sacred Ilios shall be laid low, and Priam, and the people of Priam with goodly spear of ash. 6.447. /always and to fight amid the foremost Trojans, striving to win my father's great glory and mine own. For of a surety know I this in heart and soul: the day shall come when sacred Ilios shall be laid low, and Priam, and the people of Priam with goodly spear of ash. 6.448. /always and to fight amid the foremost Trojans, striving to win my father's great glory and mine own. For of a surety know I this in heart and soul: the day shall come when sacred Ilios shall be laid low, and Priam, and the people of Priam with goodly spear of ash. 6.449. /always and to fight amid the foremost Trojans, striving to win my father's great glory and mine own. For of a surety know I this in heart and soul: the day shall come when sacred Ilios shall be laid low, and Priam, and the people of Priam with goodly spear of ash. 6.450. /Yet not so much doth the grief of the Trojans that shall be in the aftertime move me, neither Hecabe's own, nor king Priam's, nor my brethren's, many and brave, who then shall fall in the dust beneath the hands of their foemen, as doth thy grief, when some brazen-coated Achaean 6.451. /Yet not so much doth the grief of the Trojans that shall be in the aftertime move me, neither Hecabe's own, nor king Priam's, nor my brethren's, many and brave, who then shall fall in the dust beneath the hands of their foemen, as doth thy grief, when some brazen-coated Achaean 6.452. /Yet not so much doth the grief of the Trojans that shall be in the aftertime move me, neither Hecabe's own, nor king Priam's, nor my brethren's, many and brave, who then shall fall in the dust beneath the hands of their foemen, as doth thy grief, when some brazen-coated Achaean 6.453. /Yet not so much doth the grief of the Trojans that shall be in the aftertime move me, neither Hecabe's own, nor king Priam's, nor my brethren's, many and brave, who then shall fall in the dust beneath the hands of their foemen, as doth thy grief, when some brazen-coated Achaean 6.454. /Yet not so much doth the grief of the Trojans that shall be in the aftertime move me, neither Hecabe's own, nor king Priam's, nor my brethren's, many and brave, who then shall fall in the dust beneath the hands of their foemen, as doth thy grief, when some brazen-coated Achaean 6.455. /shall lead thee away weeping and rob thee of thy day of freedom. Then haply in Argos shalt thou ply the loom at another s bidding, or bear water from Messeis or Hypereia, sorely against thy will, and strong necessity shall be laid upon thee. And some man shall say as he beholdeth thee weeping: 6.456. /shall lead thee away weeping and rob thee of thy day of freedom. Then haply in Argos shalt thou ply the loom at another s bidding, or bear water from Messeis or Hypereia, sorely against thy will, and strong necessity shall be laid upon thee. And some man shall say as he beholdeth thee weeping: 6.457. /shall lead thee away weeping and rob thee of thy day of freedom. Then haply in Argos shalt thou ply the loom at another s bidding, or bear water from Messeis or Hypereia, sorely against thy will, and strong necessity shall be laid upon thee. And some man shall say as he beholdeth thee weeping: 6.458. /shall lead thee away weeping and rob thee of thy day of freedom. Then haply in Argos shalt thou ply the loom at another s bidding, or bear water from Messeis or Hypereia, sorely against thy will, and strong necessity shall be laid upon thee. And some man shall say as he beholdeth thee weeping: 6.459. /shall lead thee away weeping and rob thee of thy day of freedom. Then haply in Argos shalt thou ply the loom at another s bidding, or bear water from Messeis or Hypereia, sorely against thy will, and strong necessity shall be laid upon thee. And some man shall say as he beholdeth thee weeping: 6.460. / Lo, the wife of Hector, that was pre-eminent in war above all the horse-taming Trojans, in the day when men fought about Ilios. So shall one say; and to thee shall come fresh grief in thy lack of a man like me to ward off the day of bondage. But let me be dead, and let the heaped-up earth cover me 6.461. / Lo, the wife of Hector, that was pre-eminent in war above all the horse-taming Trojans, in the day when men fought about Ilios. So shall one say; and to thee shall come fresh grief in thy lack of a man like me to ward off the day of bondage. But let me be dead, and let the heaped-up earth cover me 6.462. / Lo, the wife of Hector, that was pre-eminent in war above all the horse-taming Trojans, in the day when men fought about Ilios. So shall one say; and to thee shall come fresh grief in thy lack of a man like me to ward off the day of bondage. But let me be dead, and let the heaped-up earth cover me 6.463. / Lo, the wife of Hector, that was pre-eminent in war above all the horse-taming Trojans, in the day when men fought about Ilios. So shall one say; and to thee shall come fresh grief in thy lack of a man like me to ward off the day of bondage. But let me be dead, and let the heaped-up earth cover me 6.464. / Lo, the wife of Hector, that was pre-eminent in war above all the horse-taming Trojans, in the day when men fought about Ilios. So shall one say; and to thee shall come fresh grief in thy lack of a man like me to ward off the day of bondage. But let me be dead, and let the heaped-up earth cover me 6.465. /ere I hear thy cries as they hale thee into captivity. 6.466. /ere I hear thy cries as they hale thee into captivity. 6.467. /ere I hear thy cries as they hale thee into captivity. 6.468. /ere I hear thy cries as they hale thee into captivity. 6.469. /ere I hear thy cries as they hale thee into captivity. So saying, glorious Hector stretched out his arms to his boy, but back into the bosom of his fair-girdled nurse shrank the child crying, affrighted at the aspect of his dear father, and seized with dread of the bronze and the crest of horse-hair 6.470. /as he marked it waving dreadfully from the topmost helm. Aloud then laughed his dear father and queenly mother; and forthwith glorious Hector took the helm from his head and laid it all-gleaming upon the ground. But he kissed his dear son, and fondled him in his arms 6.471. /as he marked it waving dreadfully from the topmost helm. Aloud then laughed his dear father and queenly mother; and forthwith glorious Hector took the helm from his head and laid it all-gleaming upon the ground. But he kissed his dear son, and fondled him in his arms 6.472. /as he marked it waving dreadfully from the topmost helm. Aloud then laughed his dear father and queenly mother; and forthwith glorious Hector took the helm from his head and laid it all-gleaming upon the ground. But he kissed his dear son, and fondled him in his arms 6.473. /as he marked it waving dreadfully from the topmost helm. Aloud then laughed his dear father and queenly mother; and forthwith glorious Hector took the helm from his head and laid it all-gleaming upon the ground. But he kissed his dear son, and fondled him in his arms 6.474. /as he marked it waving dreadfully from the topmost helm. Aloud then laughed his dear father and queenly mother; and forthwith glorious Hector took the helm from his head and laid it all-gleaming upon the ground. But he kissed his dear son, and fondled him in his arms 6.475. /and spake in prayer to Zeus and the other gods:Zeus and ye other gods, grant that this my child may likewise prove, even as I, pre-eminent amid the Trojans, and as valiant in might, and that he rule mightily over Ilios. And some day may some man say of him as he cometh back from war,‘He is better far than his father’; 6.476. /and spake in prayer to Zeus and the other gods:Zeus and ye other gods, grant that this my child may likewise prove, even as I, pre-eminent amid the Trojans, and as valiant in might, and that he rule mightily over Ilios. And some day may some man say of him as he cometh back from war,‘He is better far than his father’; 6.477. /and spake in prayer to Zeus and the other gods:Zeus and ye other gods, grant that this my child may likewise prove, even as I, pre-eminent amid the Trojans, and as valiant in might, and that he rule mightily over Ilios. And some day may some man say of him as he cometh back from war,‘He is better far than his father’; 6.478. /and spake in prayer to Zeus and the other gods:Zeus and ye other gods, grant that this my child may likewise prove, even as I, pre-eminent amid the Trojans, and as valiant in might, and that he rule mightily over Ilios. And some day may some man say of him as he cometh back from war,‘He is better far than his father’; 6.479. /and spake in prayer to Zeus and the other gods:Zeus and ye other gods, grant that this my child may likewise prove, even as I, pre-eminent amid the Trojans, and as valiant in might, and that he rule mightily over Ilios. And some day may some man say of him as he cometh back from war,‘He is better far than his father’; 6.480. /and may he bear the blood-stained spoils of the foeman he hath slain, and may his mother's heart wax glad. So saying, he laid his child in his dear wife's arms, and she took him to her fragrant bosom, smiling through her tears; and her husband was touched with pity at sight of her 6.481. /and may he bear the blood-stained spoils of the foeman he hath slain, and may his mother's heart wax glad. So saying, he laid his child in his dear wife's arms, and she took him to her fragrant bosom, smiling through her tears; and her husband was touched with pity at sight of her 6.482. /and may he bear the blood-stained spoils of the foeman he hath slain, and may his mother's heart wax glad. So saying, he laid his child in his dear wife's arms, and she took him to her fragrant bosom, smiling through her tears; and her husband was touched with pity at sight of her 6.483. /and may he bear the blood-stained spoils of the foeman he hath slain, and may his mother's heart wax glad. So saying, he laid his child in his dear wife's arms, and she took him to her fragrant bosom, smiling through her tears; and her husband was touched with pity at sight of her 6.484. /and may he bear the blood-stained spoils of the foeman he hath slain, and may his mother's heart wax glad. So saying, he laid his child in his dear wife's arms, and she took him to her fragrant bosom, smiling through her tears; and her husband was touched with pity at sight of her 6.485. /and he stroked her with his hand, and spake to her, saying:Dear wife, in no wise, I pray thee, grieve overmuch at heart; no man beyond my fate shall send me forth to Hades; only his doom, methinks, no man hath ever escaped, be he coward or valiant, when once he hath been born. 6.486. /and he stroked her with his hand, and spake to her, saying:Dear wife, in no wise, I pray thee, grieve overmuch at heart; no man beyond my fate shall send me forth to Hades; only his doom, methinks, no man hath ever escaped, be he coward or valiant, when once he hath been born. 6.487. /and he stroked her with his hand, and spake to her, saying:Dear wife, in no wise, I pray thee, grieve overmuch at heart; no man beyond my fate shall send me forth to Hades; only his doom, methinks, no man hath ever escaped, be he coward or valiant, when once he hath been born. 6.488. /and he stroked her with his hand, and spake to her, saying:Dear wife, in no wise, I pray thee, grieve overmuch at heart; no man beyond my fate shall send me forth to Hades; only his doom, methinks, no man hath ever escaped, be he coward or valiant, when once he hath been born. 6.489. /and he stroked her with his hand, and spake to her, saying:Dear wife, in no wise, I pray thee, grieve overmuch at heart; no man beyond my fate shall send me forth to Hades; only his doom, methinks, no man hath ever escaped, be he coward or valiant, when once he hath been born. 6.490. /Nay, go thou to the house and busy thyself with thine own tasks, the loom and the distaff, and bid thy handmaids ply their work: but war shall be for men, for all, but most of all for me, of them that dwell in Ilios. So spake glorious Hector and took up his helm 6.491. /Nay, go thou to the house and busy thyself with thine own tasks, the loom and the distaff, and bid thy handmaids ply their work: but war shall be for men, for all, but most of all for me, of them that dwell in Ilios. So spake glorious Hector and took up his helm 6.492. /Nay, go thou to the house and busy thyself with thine own tasks, the loom and the distaff, and bid thy handmaids ply their work: but war shall be for men, for all, but most of all for me, of them that dwell in Ilios. So spake glorious Hector and took up his helm 6.493. /Nay, go thou to the house and busy thyself with thine own tasks, the loom and the distaff, and bid thy handmaids ply their work: but war shall be for men, for all, but most of all for me, of them that dwell in Ilios. So spake glorious Hector and took up his helm 6.496. /with horse-hair crest; and his dear wife went forthwith to her house, oft turning back, and shedding big tears. Presently she came to the well-built palace of man-slaying Hector and found therein her many handmaidens; and among them all she roused lamentation.
2. Aeschylus, Libation-Bearers, 973 (6th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

973. ἴδεσθε χώρας τὴν διπλῆν τυραννίδα 973. Behold this pair, oppressors of the land, who murdered my father and ransacked my house! They were majestic then, when they sat on their thrones
3. Sophocles, Ajax, 118-133, 137-139, 14, 140, 148, 151-152, 158-186, 188, 196, 198-199, 201-202, 220, 243-256, 278-280, 298-299, 301, 311-327, 34, 349, 35, 350, 36, 364-367, 37, 372-376, 379-383, 387-391, 394-395, 401-402, 412-413, 443, 450-466, 473, 479-480, 485-524, 534, 542-543, 545-582, 586, 590-595, 611, 666-667, 67, 758-777, 110 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

4. Sophocles, Antigone, 1041, 1040 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

5. Sophocles, Oedipus At Colonus, 679-680, 678 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

6. Sophocles, Oedipus The King, 210-215, 209 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

7. Sophocles, Women of Trachis, 219-220, 218 (5th cent. BCE - 5th cent. BCE)

218. and to the nymphs her neighbors! I am uplifted, I will not spurn the flute—O you master of my heart! Behold, his ivy stirs me! Euoe!


Subjects of this text:

subject book bibliographic info
aegisthus, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 233
ajax, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 233
ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 280, 474, 475; Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 177
ajax (sophocles), and scene divisions Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 280
ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 474, 475
andromache Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 280
antigone Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 177
aristotle, on tragedy Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 280, 715
arrival, of creon Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
arrival, of the chorus Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
athena Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 177
bacchae Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 443
calchas Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 443
chorus, the, arrival of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
clytemnestra (sophocles), corpse of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 233
complication, and denouement Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
corpse as source of pollution Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 177
corpses, and the eccyclema Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 233
creon, arrival of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
dance Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 443
denouement, and complication Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
dionysus Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 443
eccyclema Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 233, 475
epic, vs. tragedy Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 280
episodes, length of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
episodes, of ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 474, 475
episodes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
festivals, dramatic Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 443
general parodos, and the choruss arrival Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
general parodos, of ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 474
hector, farewell of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 280
homer, and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 280
iliad (homer), and sophocles Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 280
machines, use of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 233
madness Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 177
mechane/mechanè Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 474
messengers, scenes of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 280
misfortunes, of ajax Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 233
orestes, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 233
phren/phrenes, seat of purity/impurity, in the ajax Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 177
phren/phrenes, seat of purity/impurity, in the antigone Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 177
platforms, use of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 233
polyneices Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 177
prologue, of ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 474
pylades, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 233
scenes Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 280
sophocles Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 177
sophronein/sophrosyne, in sophocles' Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 177
structure, of ajax (sophocles) Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 474, 475
tecmessa, and scene divisions Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 280
tecmessa, role of Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 233
tecmessa Markantonatos, Brill's Companion to Sophocles (2012) 443
tragedy Jouanna, Sophocles: A Study of His Theater in Its Political and Social Context (2018) 715
zeus Petrovic and Petrovic, Inner Purity and Pollution in Greek Religion (2016) 177